Grafting - Anybody tried it?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by 9anda1f, Apr 17, 2015.

  1. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,046
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    E Washington, USA
    Climate:
    Semi-Arid Shrub Steppe (BsK)
    I've been mulling over attempting some grafting experiments and ran across this article today: https://www.resilience.org/stories/2015-04-17/a-diy-tree-grafting-handout

    Has anyone here tried grafting? How did it work out for you?
     
  2. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,984
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I can do some grafts well, and others not so well. I am going to try again next year after buying the graft cutter. I'll read that article in a little while.
     
  3. Brian Knight

    Brian Knight Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2015
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Great link and article! When I was a much younger lad, I attempted branch layering one of my parents japenese maples. It was a resounding failure. Ive got renewed interest now as there seems to be a lot of good dwarfing rootstocks for the peach and cherry trees Ive been getting into. Thanks for the article.
     
  4. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,046
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    E Washington, USA
    Climate:
    Semi-Arid Shrub Steppe (BsK)
    By this you mean grafting cuts (i.e., diagonal, slotted, notched, etc) or tree types? I take it that making accurate cuts with a knife or scalpel is difficult, hence the graft cutter?
     
  5. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,046
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    E Washington, USA
    Climate:
    Semi-Arid Shrub Steppe (BsK)
    I've done some air layering for bonsai with maples ... my success depended on how consistently I was able to keep the layering medium moist over an extended period till the roots took hold.
    Did you try air layering or layer into the earth??
     
  6. void_genesis

    void_genesis Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I grew up grafting cacti and eventually found techniques that worked for me. The succulent tissues make it much easier than normal plants as wilting isn't as much of an issue.

    Recently I started grafting some seedling persimmons and had a good success rate. Buying a good quality grafting knife and keeping it clean and sharp is the most important part. Scalpels are too weak for most hardwood trees. Always wash and dry the knife (don't oil it or it can contaminate the cuts), and learn how to sharpen it well. Grafting tape made it easy as well. I practiced on some isolated pieces first before doing the rootstocks to get a feel for the process. For deciduous trees timing is important, usually a little before bud break as the surge in sap helps healing and growth. For evergreens you need good humidity to get away with it, either wait for the weather to be suitable or use a greenhouse (or even a portable structure if the rootstock is in the ground- a plastic bag with supports can help). Trial and error though- there are many ways to make it work, and every failure gets you closer to success as long as you are observant and responsive.
     

Share This Page

-->