Grafted Fruit Trees?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by eco4560, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    In an effort to keep costs down I had the apparently brilliant idea that I could raid friends gardens and take cuttings from their fruit trees to strike and plant into my garden. Until my family told me that I should stick to buying trees that are grafted to more hardy root stock.

    What is the collective knowledge on this? Are grafted fruit trees just part of the false commercialization of gardening - along with those expensive hybrid seedlings? Do they actually perform better?

    Looking forward to learning from the Wise Ones out there...
     
  2. Burra Maluca

    Burra Maluca Junior Member

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    Re: Grafted Fruit Trees?

    Most fruit trees are grafted onto dwarfing rootstock to keep the tree small enough to fit in your average garden. If this isn't a problem for you, there's not usually any need to bother. The problem with cuttings from fruit trees is that they are difficult to get to 'take', though some fruit trees are easier than others. Figs are pretty easy from cuttings, almonds are harder. It's difficult to get much accurate information as everyone tells you to graft instead. We are experimenting this year with digging up suckers from around our plum trees, potting them up and then we are hoping to graft from established peach and apricot trees onto the surplus plum rootstock. We also have a few peach seedlings coming up from seeds we'd saved last year.

    Here's a few links you might find useful...

    https://cooltemperate.co.uk/own_root.shtml

    https://www.orangepippin.com/articles/own-roots.aspx

    https://permaculture.wikia.com/wiki/Own-root_fruit_trees
     
  3. trimnut2

    trimnut2 Junior Member

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    Re: Grafted Fruit Trees?

    Not an owl here. I have taken cuttings for grafting for a long time. I have rarely tried to strike fruit tree cuttings, although as observed by Burra Maluca it is possible. Rootstocks have been selected for different reasons for different species. This knowledge is usually in the public domain. Rootstocks are usually not too hard to source depending on what it is. But as Burra Maluca also observes that depends on what suits you.

    If you are seeking different or unusual specimens in limited numbers I would suggest air layering. Currently I have about sixty air layers around this district on plants I want to have here. The process is relatively simple and for me usually successful.
    Ring bark a small limb approx 15mm in diameter, pliers can help here. Wrap that ring barked area in a mixture of moist peat moss and potting mix. Secure it on the branch by plastic (glad wrap can be handy here). Use a tie to hold it there. In effect a small pot on a branch that is water tight. Check after a month for rooting into the mix. Usually easily seen through the plastic. If the leaves on your chosen branch are still alive that can also point to success. If the moisture looks depleted use a syringe to inject water. After three months or so remove air layer from branch and pot up. Remove some of the leaves on the cutting to reduce water stress. Many of the rarer species I have here came via this technique.
    The only difficulty can be the ringbarking. "Slipping" bark is best. Make sure it is neat, complete, and yet does not damage the underlying wood. You want moisture traveling up that surface for a little while as the roots develop.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Re: Grafted Fruit Trees?

    Burra Maluca - I'm in a subtropical climate zone and most of the fruit you refer to would probably do poorly here. But I guess the principles remain unchanged.

    And thanks Trimnut2 - I'm might try this out at my Mum's place on her persimmon tree.
     
  5. paul wheaton

    paul wheaton Junior Member

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    Re: Grafted Fruit Trees?

    Wow! Such a cool topic!

    Somewhere, I just know there was an article about a year or two back. I keep trying to find it, but am striking out. Permaculture Magazine? Acres USA?

    I read another thread where it this was hashed through a bunch of different ways. Apparently, if you grow an apple tree from seed and do not transplant it, it will have a tap root! Now one possible problem with that is that the fruit it produces might be a "spitter." But the tree could later be grafted!
     
  6. trimnut2

    trimnut2 Junior Member

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    Re: Grafted Fruit Trees?

    Should work a treat.
     

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