Garlic Barrier: Anyone Ever Used It?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Jez, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Garlic Barrier (click to view)

    Interesting...even controls fruit fly apparently. But like most 'natural organic' controls, the question is: what is the effect on pollinators and predators?
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    I'd want to see a full ingredients list, and know how the garlic is extracted.
     
  3. Muddy

    Muddy Junior Member

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    I would be interested to know if it would control the bugs that are eating my garlic!
     
  4. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    In their FAQ, they don't even know how it affects bees, so they don't advise using it during pollination. I doubt that there is a dividing line between between good and bad insects.

    Muddy, garlic doesn't normally have pests when grown in healthy soil. You might want to get a soil test done. If its missing some vital components, you might want to fix that.

    Sue
     
  5. Jackie K

    Jackie K Junior Member

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    Now, I don't know about this product, but I was having a great deal of trouble with termites attacking and killing trees and shrubs planted during this past year; coming in for the moisture I guess, with the drought (now ended to everyone's relief) because they are on reticulation. So I crushed up a whole heap of garlic, mixed to a nice sloppy paste with olive oil, and applied liberally into the soil round the root area. Trees / shrubs that I replanted I mixed a handful into the bottom of the hole, put a layer of compost mixed with soil over it and planted. Must have fixed it for now anyway because everything has grown like crazy since. Might have to reapply when the ground starts to dry out again in summer and the termites are looking for a source of moisture. Take that you little buggers (termites) HA :lol: :lol: :twisted: :twisted:
    Jackie K
     
  6. Jackie K

    Jackie K Junior Member

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    Hi Muddy, you don't say what part of your garlic is being attacked, but I thought you might look at this :-
    From Dept of Agriculture West Australia
    ONION MAGGOT
    Beans, onions, cauliflower curds.
    Seedlings die; seed fail to germinate;
    maggots at roots, maggots on curds.
    Most active, Spring - Autumn.
    Lays eggs in organic matter; dig in well before planting.
    All the best,
    Jackie K
     
  7. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Thanks for posting this. I didn't know it would keep away ticks and birds, which would be really wonderful for grapes and berries.

    Because garlic can be a strong anti-bacterial, it's important not to spray the ground where there's compost and biological activity that's necessary. I'm not sure if composting a lot of leaves sprayed with garlic (like the whole grape leaf crop) would discourage microbial activity. I image after some time has passed it will break down and not play much of a role.

    Garlic is primarily made of sulfur compounds. allicin, one of the sulfur-compounds responsible for garlic's characteristic odor, is a powerful anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral agent that joins forces with vitamin C to help kill harmful microbes.

    Diallyl disulfide is another sulfur compound in garlic. I haven't found anything negative about either of these, just lots of studies regarding human health, which seems to be good news.

    I know bees love garlic chive flowers and garlic flowers, so the odor doesn't bother them.

    According to this article, the bees will have improvement in their colorectal problems :)

    https://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/co ... /22/8/1155


    Pebble, the ingredients are on another link on that site, it's almost all garlic juice, some citric acid and .2% potassium sorbate for freshness.
     
  8. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Yep, point taken Sue - I guess my question is whether it's actually harmful (very doubtful IMO) or just acts as a barrier/repellant. If it's the latter, it could be very useful for certain applications.

    Glad you found it useful Sweetpea - please keep us updated as to the results if you do use it.

    I'm just contemplating netting for the orchard I'm putting in (only about a 1/4 acre to begin with) due to the massive flocks of hungry parrots etc, plus fruit fly is always of some concern here...this product seemed like a potential silver bullet...providing pollination and beneficial insects weren't affected.

    I've been using Naturalure for fruit fly and it works very well, except you do need to be careful of bees - which is possible, but you never really know if you're not killing ANY bees.

    Seeing Garlic Barrier is just mostly highly concentrated garlic, I suspect you could brew it at home with a pot-still used for essential oils. :wink:
     
  9. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Here's an interesting study on different solutions of garlic and their effects on humans:


    https://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/131/3/1080S

    And here's the method for obtaining:

    Raw garlic juice, skinned raw garlic cloves that were crushed in a Waring blender for 1 min, together with an equal weight of water. The mixture was then allowed to stand for 30 min at 25°C. After filtration through cheesecloth, the raw garlic sample was obtained.

    ======

    And if one gallon of the Garlic Barrier makes 300 gallons of spray, we can dilute that solution quite a bit and still have it be effective. They probably have found a way to distill those sulfur compounds and make it much more concentrated than just crushing garlic the way we'd do it, so our mixture wouldn't be as strong as theirs. I imagine we'd have to respray after a rain or heavy wet fog.
     
  10. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Update:

    I made a garlic juice spray from a heaping tablespoon of chopped garlic, whirled in a blender with some warm water, it steeped for a few hours. I used a single-cup coffee filter and poured water through the garlic mash, collecting the diluted juice in a coffee cup. I diluted it to the contents of a household-sized spray bottle.

    Squirrels are running off with my green peaches, so I sprayed the peaches, and they haven't touched them. It's been three days. I'm going to dilute the mixture a bit more and give them a reminder spray. I'll be interested to see if the peaches taste like garlic.

    I also sprayed my olive tree because the birds are eating all the olives, and they've left them alone. I wouldn't mind if the olives tasted like garlic :)

    Also, refrigerate this juice. Within two days it got mold which, of course, instantly clogged the spray bottle. I should have known! But I think it's doing well so far :)
     
  11. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Thanks Sweetpea, well done and keep the updates coming. :thumbright:

    I have some white mulberries just coming into fruit and I haven't got around to netting them yet, so I might give it a test on the weekend.

    Birds and fruit flies are my main concerns...I knew garlic was good for lots of things, but if it can deter birds and fruit flies I'm going to be pretty chuffed. :D

    I also have quite a bit of neem about the place, so I'm considering making a mix brew down the track.
     
  12. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    'Nother update: IT DIDN'T WORK

    3 days later the squirrels took the peaches, so it didn't work for long.

    I had better luck with bedsheets hanging from the branches.

    I am going to try my egg yolk spray, which kept off the bigger animals and see how that does.
     
  13. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Why not just grow heaps of garlic in and around your garden...

    Why do people keep pushing manufactured products from overseas??????

    Whts wrong with planting lotsa diferent herbs all over/around the garden..

    You get enough different smells in a garden ittll be enough to confuse most bugs and other pesky animals from entering the garden...

    I have to laugh/ or cry sometimes with people in here complaining about this nd tht animal/bug/insect invading the precious fruit,vegies..

    HOW ON EARTH DID THE PIONEERS/Older generations survive,...

    Im sure they didnt race of to get netting,barriers etc to grow food.....

    Permaculture is about solving problems not advertising stuff made in other countries and being delivered round the world....etc etc..

    Lets pull our fingers outta our bums and do it properly, not rely on someone elses ideas......

    After all this is the worlds largest FREE Permaculture ADVICE Board...


    A healthy mix of various different herbs DOES HAVE an EFFECT on the eradication of pests in a garden,AND ALSO has a great track record of healthy pest control of our domesticated animals.....


    Has anyone here taken the time to smell a garden ........

    A good Permies garden will find lots of different smells wafting around the area,tickling the nostrils,,,,Walking past a plant and smelling the resulting odours....

    They say ,that some people need to stop and smell the roses.....

    Well its time to start smelling the herbs also...

    Lotsa diferent smells will confuse even the old cunning fox,and no doubt a lot of other predators,

    Foxes cant smell chooks if they surrounded by strong garlic or other herbs.

    If they cant smell em theyll never find em I say

    Tezza
     
  14. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Thanks Sweetpea...I'm going to give a several times distilled version a crack...the sulphur compounds may perhaps come to the fore more and they may well be the major factor in deterrent. The fact it worked for a few days is a good sign IMO.


    Tezza,

    The only reason this thread was started was in an effort to:

    a) Determine how effective the product was
    b) Attempt to mimic its effectiveness USING A HOME MADE RECIPE.


    If you have suggestions for keeping hundreds of parrots out of a small yard beyond netting, using physical deterrents or possibly spraying something organic to deter them, then please feel free to let us know.

    When hundreds of birds descend like locusts and strip every piece of fruit from your mature trees in an afternoon, you don't just sit there and go 'oh bugger, there goes my entire harvest again' - you do something practical to prevent it.

    Someday, when and if you get around to doing your PDC, you'll learn that one of the most important lessons in Permaculture is TO GET A YIELD. Bill, David, and every other Permie author says the same thing.

    In our area, on the amount of land we have, 'getting a yield' means netting fruit trees or finding another way to prevent hundreds of birds from devastating the harvest. There are hundreds if not thousands of examples of Permaculture designs on small properties incorporating bird netting, fencing, barriers and the vast majority of Permaculturalists use the occasional organic solution in the home or garden. If the solution above (garlic) helps out with fruit fly bred on other properties which then come to my place, then even better.

    Would you give a condescending lecture on 'what Permaculture is about' to David Holmgren for running hotwires through his orchard at Melliodora to keep the goats eating the fodder trees and not the fruit trees? Are you going to lecture Bill for saying that chooks should be fenced out of vegie gardens and rampant birds deterred when it's a small property and you need to get a yield?

    I don't disagree that planting a diverse range of herbs and diverse plantings themselves help to prevent insects from attacking your vegetables (although IMO great soil and healthy plants does more), but it doesn't do a damn thing to prevent birds eating your fruit or to prevent fruit fly bred off your land from invading.
     
  15. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Tezza, you can stop a squirrel from stealing fruit out of a 10 foot fruit tree by planting herbs nearby? What herbs are these?
     
  16. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Ill say it again Jez......

    You dont read my posts properly..You only think you read what you read..

    Not sure about the squirells yet Sweetpea but theres been a few answers that would help allready posted on this subject...

    I dont have squirals but i do have cat problem,actually i dont have a real problem,just an imaginary problem.....

    Cats visit my garden.......i have no rodents.....the cats want my chook food not my chooks or my chicks......

    can anyone tell me what my, if any problem is?..

    Sometimes after removing certain elements from our grand schemes,can upset the natural balance of things.....


    whats missing, could be just the answer......

    No great secret ingredient.......Nothing more Nothing less..


    Glad both our tempers have eased Jez...

    Tezza
     
  17. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    Ok Tezza, I was specifically addressing comments like these:


    Who were the above comments aimed at if they weren't directed at me? You misinterpreted the whole thread which I started as some sort of advertising campaign for a US company, because you didn't read what was written properly. Then you tell me I've misinterpreted you, despite the fact your words above are pretty clear...and bizarrely, say I have a history of misinterpreting what you say...yet I can remember no such incidents... :lol:

    Am I to assume you don't have a suggestion for keeping hundreds of parrots and galah's out of fruit trees?



    I'm not angry with you at all now or before Tezza (and I've got no idea why you were angry with me?), but I do feel obliged to respond when you start lecturing me on 'what Permaculture is about' and that what I'm doing is 'not Permaculture'...without reading what was actually written, without realising that different situations require different solutions, and without realising that what I'm doing is common, widely taught and recommended when necessary.

    Anyway, I haven't taken offense, merely defended the thread and the reasons behind it. :wink:
     
  18. TCLynx

    TCLynx Junior Member

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    Last year I was doing my best to garden while living in a little apartment, the squerls kept digging up my containers for whatever reason they do such things. Then one day we had some garlic that sprouted and planted a few cloves in a couple of the containers. I later noticed that the containers with the garlic we not getting dug up by the squerls anymore though other containers still were. From then on I decided to plant garlic with my other plants as much as I can. Since I have not had as much luck getting quantitys of garlic that grows well in my area at all times of year, I've been trying to substitute onion. Doesn't seem to work as well but I can start onion seeds all the time to keep me in onion sets, though they don't seem to survive outside here during the hot part of summer.
     
  19. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    One thing to keep in mind about how any kind of gardening works is what the environment is in which one is gardening.

    Anyone in the suburbs, where there are close neighbors who have been using pesticides for years, and have stopped influxes of bugs and rodents with nonpermaculture ways have "co-workers" they benefit from. There are a lot of critters they don't have to deal with because they've already been eradicated.

    I am gardening in a rural zone, with no neighbors, and only bugs and wild animals, no help from previous generations of others eradicating things. It's a very different environment, one which I won't be able to change, only to try to co-exist with and keep the invaders to a minimum. A few plants that might work in a suburban situation wouldn't stand a chance where I am because it would take acres of it to compete with the weed population that is home to my bugs, so it's always a try-and-see kind of proposition :)

    Tezza, about the cats, they hate orange oil, and you can make an orange oil tea from the rinds of oranges to spray onto rags that hang on your chook runs. You can also hang fresh peels . Hang them closely, about a foot apart, or adjust the distance as necessary. Replace when they dry out. Respray the rags when you can't smell the orange on them.
     
  20. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    TCLynx, that's interesting. Thanks for that info.

    Here's something I found about garlic oil concentrate, which must be much stronger than what I tried. This is about gophers, but I imagine it is what is working with the other critters that that product claims it will repel:

    https://clearwaterlandscapes.com/article_gophers.htm

    "After experimenting for two years with the garlic repellent units, we are convinced that these are the best and easiest form of gopher control. Surprisingly, even though the gophers love fresh garlic, the sulfer compounds in the concentrated oil drives them away. The only maintenance after initial application has been re- inserting the few that the gophers pop up out of their runs."

    =======

    If you search on "garlic oil concentrate" it comes up as a pretty inexpensive nutritional supplement. Be sure not to get the odorless kind!
     

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