fruit trees from seed

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by colours, May 17, 2008.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    It occurred to me that many seed grown fruit and ornamental plants have another use - grafting stock
    For example most roses are grafted to seed grown stock of wild roses. The assumption is the old varieties have a more vigotrous root system and your cultivar will therefore grow stronger. Also you can make a lot of roses from a little bud material.
    So you might be able to teach kids some grafting too?
    You could make a Frankenstein with 4-+ varieties on one tree that would be fun!
     
  2. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    You can plant anything and everything, as long as you have good soil, lots of water and lots of compost and mulch. Ten years from now you may have a large collection of big, healthy trees that produce absolute garbage fruit. Well, at least you could probably use them as fire wood, but that's an awful lot of wasted energy and resources for fire wood.

    It seems that you would be better off growing smallfruits and/or veggies and selling them to your neighbors, and earmarking the profit for some decent young fruit trees of known heritage.

    The Granny Smith apple was a sport. Plant the seeds and in several years you will probably get.... crabapples, which are where it came from.

    Sue
     
  3. colours

    colours Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    thanks I have a dam and therefore water isn't so much of a problem. The manure will be supplied by my chooks and compost and then there's my free labour. So the scientist in me says I'll give it a go. Who knows I might produce the world's prettiest crab apple flower? And I agree, what could be a better use than for cider, at least I'l have something to drink while I'm laughing at myself...


    Thanks for your help everyone, I'll be sure to remember you if I find a beauty and will send cuttings. :wink:
     
  4. thepoolroom

    thepoolroom Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    If you end up with a good healthy tree but poor fruit, you could use it as an established rootstock for grafting. And the timber from apple trees is apparently very good to shave for smoking meat etc.

    I reckon you have nothing to lose!
     
  5. Tamara

    Tamara Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    When I was at Bill's, I was astonished at how much he grew from seed: nectarines, oaks, chestnuts, he just plants anything!

    And there I was worrying about rootstock and grafting (which I still do).

    My gran was famous for growing something from seed. If something new was at the supermarket (in Whyalla) home is would come and in the ground it went. Sometimes they would grow, sometimes they wouldn't. Sometimes they would die in the 45 degree heat in summer. But I don't think that was the point, really. I get too worried that what I plant won't grow - and what happens? I never try. So I will do as my gran did. Stick it in the ground and see. And it is fantastic that you're doing just that.

    ps. The time I spent with family just doing stuff like planting or making porrige or playing backyard cricket was way better than the stuff money but no time buys.

    I did plant a nectarine seed the other day!

    love T
     
  6. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    Welcome Comrade
    (Did you know gardening is now a subversive activity?)

    OFF TOPIC but sort of? somehow? relevant? :idea:
    A friend has been revegetating her property with help from land care and local council
    She couldn't get seed of a native grass seed she needed and finally tracked in down in Qld. (She is in NSW). The grass grew really well, but flowered much too early for its local polinators.
    Fascinating that this Qld. grass is botanically exactly the same as local grass; but not?

    I have recently moved about 50K north and a little closer to the coast.
    I have parsley plants now in their forth year. They are supposed to be biennials at best.
    Is this Global Warming?

    I guess the point is plant everything and let nature take its course
    ( Although I would like to strangle the odd possum)

    What a great start to a school garden?


    A lots of rambling thoughts. I hope they connect with someone equally as scatterbrained.
     
  7. Comfrey

    Comfrey Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    Scatterbrained is something I do well.
    Since reading this thread the kids and I have set up a load of "experiments" outside the back door. So far we've got two leeks growing from one off-cut root, a mango seed sprouting and every single fruit or vegetable that has been through the kitchen planted or propped in a saucer of water. We also started looking under every tree we go past for sprouting seedlings, so far we've found two tiny carobs and a wonderful walnut already a foot high still attached to the nut. It's obvious that plants grow from seed, but something of a revelation when you try it in this ad hoc way. It's free, it's fun.
     
  8. paradisi

    paradisi Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    and that's what its all about
     
  9. backyardfarmer

    backyardfarmer Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    yep _ I agree - try it and see.

    One suggestion I have, though, is to try to source your seeds from locally grown fruits - friends, neighbours or local farmers' markets. That way, you will at least be attempting to grow something that has already grown in your climate/area. I would think you'd get a higher success rate than starting with a seed that was produced in north queensland or victoria.

    good luck
     
  10. JoanVL

    JoanVL Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    I don't think anyone has mentioned Plum Pine. I was at a herb show at the Botanic gardens and they were giving away Plum Pine seeds, an Australian native. I planted 5 in pots - apparently the fruit is small, blue and edible. Nothing has appeared yet, but it was only a month or so ago.

    I had a real mystery with passion fruit - I've always grown them from seed, from an original Panama Red vine I bought years ago. Last year a seedling sprang up somehwere, so I found a nice place for it - and 'banana' passion fruits came up - a yellow variety. I was really puzzled till I remembered we'd had our wedding anniversary BBQ in the back yard, and someone had brought a passionfruit dessert! So I think it is safe to say that passionfruit is easy to grow from seed.
     
  11. Paul Cereghino

    Paul Cereghino Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    One advantage of some cultivars is resistance to local diseases. Can be critical for some species.
    Consider also cuttings or learning how to graft. Scion wood can be easy to come by... rootstock seedlings are relatively cheap.
     
  12. colours

    colours Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    a friend at work told me (and I just checked), if you go to Daleys Fruit (daleysfruit.com.au) the website lists all of its products and often states if a plant is relatively true to type from seed (polyembryonic - whatever that means). Just thought I'd mention it as it might save us all a lot of hard work if we are actually trying for a particular variety from seed.
     
  13. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    Polyembryonic means more than one embryo per seed, so more than one plant per seed. There are a number of species that produce these multi-plant seeds: some citrus, mango etc. When it happens, it is often the case that one of the seeds is a clone so that one most certainly will grow true to type.
     
  14. colours

    colours Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    Is there a way of telling which seedling will be the clone before it sets fruit?
     
  15. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    I don't know how you'd tell. Perhaps with things like leaf vein patterns, leaf size and shape and so on. An experienced plant breeder uses things like this to tell whether a cross-pollination actually worked or not.
     
  16. colours

    colours Junior Member

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    Re: fruit trees from seed

    ok thanks. I guess it would help if you had the mother plant to compare.
     
  17. plainright

    plainright Guest

    Re: fruit trees from seed

    very slow...grape cuttins are very fast...and rich peak crop output in 3 yrs....
     

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