fruit fly control

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by naturally inspired, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. naturally inspired

    naturally inspired Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    so, we are going to put in a coupe, of fruit trees, probably navel oranges and maybe a lime tree at the moment. we were thinking about peaches or nectarines as well BUT the fruit fly has been absolutely hammering these fruits down here in the past 3 years. i am wondering what kind of organic, safe measures there is to help reduce the damage caused by fruit fly. the nursery said there isnt really, you have to spray them BUT i really dont think that is the ONLY way.
     
  2. Cornonthecob

    Cornonthecob Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Exclusion bags will stop fruit fly. Look up the Green Harvest web site. I've brought the three types they have. If you like I can send you one of each and you can 'try before you buy'.... PM an address and I'll mail them off.

    They are also good for stopping birds eating your fruit!

    :)
     
  3. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,536
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    You can provide the fruit flies with bait, like, for example, ripe bananas. When they lay their eggs into the banana you will notice them, and then you cycle the egg laden banana through a pig, chook or duck (or into biogas plant), breaking the breeding cycle. This is not %100 effective, but if managed well, will reduce their numbers significantly.
     
  4. mad rabbit woman

    mad rabbit woman Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hmmm. I think
    I recall reading somewhere about traps you can make using port wine + something in a plastic bottle with the top cut off and inverted (like a funnel) into the bottle.
    will try to find out more details
     
  5. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,335
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Those traps work well MRW, but it's better to put the 'funnels' in through the sides because otherwise you have trouble from rain and/or debris filling your traps. IMO it's also worth narrowing the entrance so fruit flies can get in but bees can't easily. A little bit of beer is a good bait if you have access to it cheaply, otherwise anything they'd normally be attracted to which is a bit smelly mixed in water will do.

    NI, as Chris says, breaking the breeding cycle is the important part of the long term maintenance, so make sure you give them as little chance to breed as possible by picking up all fallen fruit ASAP or better still allowing poultry to do the work for you.

    Green Harvest also sell an organic bait which attracts and kills off the female fruit flies, so this is another means to breaking the breeding cycle, but beware that it also can affect bees and other insects. However, it can seriously help...I've used it and it didn't affect my bee numbers or pollination detrimentally, but I was careful about placement.

    Exclusion is ok I guess if you only have a few trees to cover which are within easy reach and don't bear too much fruit, but is a mammoth, expensive job if you have a lot of fruit to cover and also grow annual fruits which are affected.

    You're right, stone fruit will get hammered...unless you REALLY want to grow that type of fruit I'd give them a miss if you are in a very fruit fly prone area.
     
  6. Douglas J.E. Barnes

    Douglas J.E. Barnes Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2005
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  7. naturally inspired

    naturally inspired Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks for all the info guys! i think we are going to put in citrus trees now instead of stonefruit cos they seem to grow better in this area. and as we only have very limited space its pretty much one or the other. citrus just seems easier lol. yum fresh squeezed orange juice here we come!!
     
  8. grease

    grease Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2005
    Messages:
    105
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Fruit fly have been known to lay eggs in citrus when no other host is available.( the grubs don't survive because of the citric acid, but it does put you off eating the fruit unless you don't care where you get your protein from ) I live in an area that is thick with fruit fly. Traps work fairly well but the only way to ensure a fruit fly free crop in the short term is chemicals. The only way to get on top of the problem in the long term is to get every one in your area to actively address the problem. This doesn't happen in my neck of the woods as there are too many neglected fruit trees acting as hosts.
    Connecting to another thread about loquat trees, fruit fly love loquat trees as they fruit just at the right time for fruit fly to lay eggs. I have a loquat tree in my back yard that I have been cojutating about for a while now. I refuse to use the chemicals required (recommended) and have been losing the battle against fruit fly. I think I will have to remove it to gain an edge over the relentless fly. :(
     
  9. Peter Warne

    Peter Warne Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2002
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A friend of mine who runs a rainforest seedling nursery (and grows a few fruit trees) swears by this: he puts a layer of cardboard from cartons underneath each fruit tree. He says since the fruitfly can't drop from the fruit onto earth or grass when they hatch in the fruit, the parent fly won't lay in those fruit. He says he has done it for three seasons running and had success each year.

    It may present a slight problem with watering, but I have underground drip lines, so that shouldn't be a problem, except for the fact that the cardboard will block rain from landing within the dripline area. Perhaps this could be offset by cutting a rain collecting trench into the ground in a V pattern, uphill from the tree.

    I intend to try this method this spring. I still have to work out exactly when to lay the cardboard down. My nectarine and peach trees are already showing their first blossoms.

    Peter
     
  10. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,335
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nice one Peter...that's a train of thought on cutting out the breeding cycle I hadn't come across before...very interesting.
     
  11. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,405
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
  12. Cornonthecob

    Cornonthecob Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Having chooks amongst your trees will also deter, to some degree, fruit fly. The chooks should also eat any larve that fall from bitten fruit...thus breaking the cycle??

    :)
     
  13. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,335
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've been musing about Peter's cardboard suggestion today and was wondering whether a layer of a scoria type material or another type of large particle gravel (much the same as Joel suggests in an aquaponics system) would have the same effect of deterring fruit flies from laying in fruit which fell upon it...and yet still allow full rainfall, drainage and breathing unlike cardboard?

    Any thoughts as to whether this would be similarly effective?

    May be a workable concept for small applications or for those with access to a lot of a suitable material for free or at an expense which wasn't prohibitive...
     
  14. Cornonthecob

    Cornonthecob Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Messages:
    927
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    But if you use gravel Jez how would you feed your soil?
     
  15. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,335
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just fertigate using irrigation under the gravel would be the best way I reckon Corn, but those aqua spikes they have at Green Harvest or something similar would work quite well too I guess.

    I would also guess that any liquid nutrient or feeder mulch that you just applied to the top of the gravel would be flushed through the gravel layer too if it was the larger particle types of gravel. If you let comfrey dry in the sun for a few days you can just rub it between your hands and it comes out virtually like a powder...would make its way through the gravel layer quite quickly I'd say and be still flushing a small amount of nutrient through with watering in the meantime as its breaking down.

    We inherited a mulberry tree planted virtually straight in a little used pathway which is topped with gravel that surrounds the base of the tree...it's not worth running a line to it where it is situated and I didn't want to disturb its relatively mature roots, so I just scrape off the top little bit of gravel and bury shredded comfrey there...give it a liquid comfrey feed now and again...seems to work fine as it was in pretty poor condition when we arrived but has noticeably picked up a lot since it's had a little attention.
     
  16. DragonFly

    DragonFly New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: fruit fly control

    This will put a :lol: :D on your face. Hi, I am what is called an Intuitive. Do you want to have a go at a this. Try getting the fruit flies pupae and any fruit with them still in it and sorry for the gorry details, but crush them up. Then put warm water over the crushed fruit fly mush. Leave for a day or two. It will become really smelly for a bit. Then spray the plant with this concoction. Alla vista, reduced fruit flies. But you must remember to do it after rain again. Of course, it is just common sense. No animal or insect will go where it smells the death of its own kind.By the way this is copywrite, but for all for the general public use with compliments, a fellow human being that enjoys eating the fruit she grows. P.S I also use chooks and make sure I have a thick mulch. ANd I remove any interferred with fruit immediately.
    Please try it. INsects work on smell, just give one that is offensive and they won't stay around.
     
  17. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re:

    Some many years ago a group of organic small farmers ringed a valley near Kurrajong NSW with Dak Pot traps. that year they had virtually no fruit fly in the whole valley.
    So they went to everyone and said "We can't afford to do this ourselves we need everyone and/or the Local Council to 'chip in'. You can see how effective it was in protecting our fruit crops"
    Of course that's where the plan failed :(

    It is very disheartening in suburbia trying to grow fruit. There is little point in traps if your neighbours don't trap and collect fallen fruit etc.Although some areas are so devoid of fruit tress now that you might be lucky for a while.
    I am amazed that fruit fly will attack chillies and yes I have seen them strike Oranges. i didn't know they died (Then, fruit flies do adapt. The ones in wineries no longer are killed by alcohol! :drinkers: also see pic below )

    You could move to Paradise-- Tasmania -no fruit fly.

    Every backyard has a plum,fig or other fruit tree!

    Here are some other ideas
    Interesting post & picture by gardenlen here
    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=9162&start=15
    [​IMG]
    https://www.ecoorganicgarden.com.au/product.php?id=4
    [​IMG]
    https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/Wild-May- ... System.htm
    Gardening Australia discussion at
    https://www2b.abc.net.au/gardening/newpo ... 03938.shtm
    Managing Fruit Fly in Citrus
    https://72.14.235.132/search?q=cache:6zi ... clnk&gl=au
    [​IMG]
    https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/blog/2006 ... ol_30.html
    https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/blog/2006 ... ol_30.html
    [​IMG]
    https://www.pir.sa.gov.au/pirsa/more/fac ... /fruit_fly
    [​IMG]
    https://www.pir.sa.gov.au/pirsa/more/fac ... /fruit_fly
    [​IMG]
    Wild May Fruit Fly Trap -Daley's

    Does anyone know how organic &/or useful this is?
    https://www.yates.com.au/products/pest-c ... y-control/
     
  18. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,464
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: fruit fly control

    g'day michaelangelica,

    was looking at anotehr product with spinosad, only down side spinosad no good for the bees, that we have so few of. the attractans and baits mostly as i know it for the male fly they are the easy one to get, but removing males does not guarantee no fertile females, we just went through a disasterous summer lost every tomato and we run male wick traps all year long in the same period we must have trapped around 900++ males but the females where still in droves and fertile.

    what's needed is a female bait for traps, those liquid ones we have on our remedies page failed dismaly, and one of those is peddled by the abc garden show.

    so next season it will be mossy net covers for the tom's sadly but that does nothing to control the populations of female fly only ensures we et frut to eat. going to be difficult protecting the pawpaws but hey? they do say if we slip nylon stocking sections over the fruit that will help? guess we will know sometime next season hey?

    len
     
  19. paradisi

    paradisi Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2005
    Messages:
    665
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: fruit fly control

    cleanliness is next to ....

    the neighbour with the 15m tall guava - and usually 500kg of rotting fruit - rented out the place and teh people their are fastidious about the fruit on the grund - not because it stops fruit fly, but because it looks messy.... anyway, their cleaning up the fruit has cut down the fruit fly drastically.
     
  20. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,464
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: fruit fly control

    g'day paradisi,

    i reckon someone around here has got a quava, we are inundated. we lived next door to a prson with 4 quava's in their back yard i made a deal with him that i'd collect all the fruit each season off the tree he was happy he had interest in the fuit then he didn't get to mow over rotten fruit, and it helped control the f/f.

    len
     

Share This Page

-->