Fodder Trees

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by Tegs, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    We are trying to build our 6 acres into an almost sustainable property. As we are meat eaters the plan includes livestock for meat. Does anyone have any suggestions for fodder trees that could also double as wind break/ shelter. Our property is on the central Queensland coast so the climate is sup-tropical. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Chamaecytisus proliferus...

    I've heard it does well in Queensland tropics
     
  3. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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  4. Dalzieldrin

    Dalzieldrin Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    tagaste not a contender?
     
  5. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Chamecytisus proliferous
     
  6. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    I think milifestyle was showing off a bit! :mrgreen:
     
  7. Dalzieldrin

    Dalzieldrin Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    *headslap*...perhaps, but a good 'own' all the same :-D
     
  8. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Thanks for the suggestions, I want to give everything and anything a go to see what will work. I am hoping that the fodder trees can fill the gap during the dry season when the pasture becomes a bit thin on the ground. We have a long road ahead of us with soil improvement before our "grass" will sustain anything for more than a few months.
    Thanks again!
     
  9. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    No. Only stating that it was already mentioned as a possible contender.
     
  10. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Has anyone ever heard of lemongarss being used as stock feed?
     
  11. janahn

    janahn Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    two crucial questions 1) soil type 2) rainfall and, lets add 3) temperature range.

    good chance it is best to forget tagasatse.

    www.janahn.com.au
     
  12. kerrip

    kerrip Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Have you thought about the Tree Lucerne?
     
  13. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Re: Fodder Trees

    Ok, the soil is heavy grey clay that becomes quite waterlogged in some areas during the summer months. Parts are sandy but mostly it's clay. Rainfall is about 1100mm per year with the bulk of it falling during the summer months and with winter being prodominently dry. And temp range is usually no cooler than 17degreesC during our winter days and rarely above 40degreesC during summer.

    I have planted a carob tree along a new swale and it seems to be thriving even without much TLC over the past dryer than normal months. I think I will try and get my hands on some more.

    I was thinking clumping bamboo could be a good multi purpose plant that would also be good for some erosion control.

    Why no tagasate?
     
  14. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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  15. kimbo.parker

    kimbo.parker Junior Member

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    tags is cool,,,but we can do better than that

    go the tagasaste,,,the el primo stock food.....but also the prime bee tree,,,,good for wood....lovely perfume....native birds use it........it is a legume........
    it is soft when so many fodder trees are hard (acacia spp.)
    carob is a stock food at year 50? and comes into it's best at maybe year 100?........and that is 'if' the sucker does not have a taproot issue,,,how many carobs do you meet with a tap root issue - most.

    There is a trap for the unaware here; if you research 'fodder trees' you miss all the human food trees that are ALSO dam fine fodder trees............screech of brakes>>>>>>>
    sod fodder trees,
    grow mulberries..........stock love em.........ALL Stock........sheep, cattle, chooks, yabbies.

    definitely mulberries in amongst a tags nursery crop..........layers and levels.
    you eat meat,,,do you kill it?
    i do,,,i don't like it,,,,,,,,it really effects my meat eating. I love my cattle,,,i hate my chooks and find killing them hard,,,,the good thing is i don't have to gut em.
    i tell the wife and daughter......i killed it, you cut it.
    dam 6 yo has her own knife!.......frigin carnivores!.......
    regards,
    Kimbo
     
  16. Bird

    Bird Junior Member

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    if you have space Rain tree may be the go
    heres a link with info to see
    www.agroforestry.net/tti/Samanea-raintree.pdf

    people/animal food
    nitrogen fixer
    shade tree - a bloody big one
    supplier of nitrogen rich mulch
    easy to grow from seed and quickish growing
     
  17. kimbo.parker

    kimbo.parker Junior Member

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    i rekon plant seeds, not seedlings, a tiny carob has a big taproot,,it that sucker starts chucking laps arround the base of the pot, that carob has a small future.
    regards,
    Kimbo
     
  18. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Mulberries of course, Isn't it always the things that are right in front of you that are hardest to see! Easy to propagate and grow as well as tasty! I had a magnificent mulberry tree until our cows pushed it over to get the last of the leaves at the very top of the tree. They loved it! I might have to plant them in a safer position where they can be nibbled but not decimated!
    To answer your question yes we keep our stock for meat. We have a local butcher come out and do the deed for us. I don't think we have the skill level or the equipment to do the animal justice by butchering it ourselves, maybe in the future.
    This might be slightly off topic but does anyone have any thoughts on feeding palm seeds to pigs? Could this be bad for them? We had too pigs that stopped eating the grower pellets when we put them out into a paddock full of native palms. The palm seeds were the only thing that I could think of that they could be eating in sufficient numbers to satisfy their appetites.
     
  19. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    Not showing off THAT much. Its TAGASASTE, not "tagaste".
     
  20. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    I guess I made an AS of myself then
     

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