Flowers

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by annette, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    I was just wondering if and what sort of flowers people plant and for what purpose. I know lots of us plant flowers for pollination and beneficial insects, but does anyone just plant them for their beauty, boost the spirit or to bring inside?

    Does anyone have a separate area just for the pretties?

    I'm building a purple garden in memory of a friend of mine who passed away recently. Her favourite colour was purple and so would like some suggestions of good purple flowers or plants.

    Spring has sprung here in south east Queensland.:clap:
     
  2. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    Borage bees
    Sunflowers birds
    Cosmos Daisies,good bugs
    Marigolds,nematodes and bugs
    Alyssum bugs
    Grevillia & Bottle brush ,birds
    Camelia ,my wife likes them
     
  3. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Violets,they smell wonderful this time of year.Nice leaves for a ground cover under other things.
    I plant these under trees and have let them grow across the front path-its a 4' wide path which I felt looked like a lot of concrete.Now it sort of disappeared and the violets dont trip me up when I walk over them so I figure they should be safe enough for anybody else.

    There is an Australian type with white and purple flowers but I cant remember if they have a scent or not, I think they do.
     
  4. BlueSkyBee

    BlueSkyBee Junior Member

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    Heliotrope Cherry Pie is a lovely smelling purple flower/small shrub. Hardenbergia is a nice purple climber, Alyogyne are purple hibiscus like flowers, Scaevola is a nice purple groundcover. Wisteria is a purple climber. Purple penstemons, roses.

    I try to look around me at all times and see what the bees are working on, and then plant some if I have none, (unless noxious weed) and will also plant anyhing I think is beautiful and grows easily in my area - not terribly interested in coddling things!! Also, I must be able to pick a beautiful bunch of flowers toput inside at any time of year, the aesthetics are very important to me, and above all, variety! Variety helps the ecology of your place be it shelter, shade, nutrition, food for bees, other insects animals.... just plant plant plant. I love Jackie Frenchs writings. :)
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Marigolds for the nematodes. Borage for the edible flowers and bees. Poppies because they make me smile. Nasturtiums because you can eat them. Native violets as ground cover. Geraniums for the wonderful fragranced leaves. Jasmine and several different ginger species for the fragrance.

    Purple cosmos mass planted look great in a gentle breeze. Hardenbergia would be good as a hardy perennial if you wanted something less ephemeral.
     
  6. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    I love purple.

    Do you have room for a Tipochina? They come in dwarf. Ageratum is a great weed. Society garlic chives. I will try for some "real " names later if I remember.
    :party:
     
  7. chook-in-eire

    chook-in-eire Junior Member

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    Crocus, daffodils and tulips for that spring feeling (and the bees); roses for their beauty and scent, Nasturtiums, borage and Calendulas for beneficials and a splash of colour in the veg garden, Malva zebrina (purple!) for their beauty (and for bees, bumblebees etc.), old-fashioned Dahlias for their long-lasting colourful blooms (early summer to first frost) and the pollinators like the single varieties too.
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I was super serious about using www.sown.com.au for our area, Annette.

    Melastoma affine - the native replacement for Tibouchina. Grows on wet sclerophyll, which is like your moist area (even though most of your block is dry sclerophyll). Called Blue Tongue because the edible fruit will stain your tongue. All in the link with a good picture. A hardy pioneer plant, I have one at my house. I assume I can take cuttings.

    Dianella caerulea - spreading native grass with blue-ish flowers. Good for native bees. Flower in link. Purple berries.

    Alpinia caerulea - Native Ginger has purple berries.

    Native Violet Pics - I have some here too, probably cuttings again.

    And the absolute winner for purple flowers from the top of my head (and it's also a nitrogen fixer!):

    Hovea acutifolia - Covered in purple for a period, short-lived.


    I could ask the work nursery, the manager there will know many more than I.


    Edit: Eco already pulled Hardenbergia, another nitrogen-fixer.
     
  9. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I flicked through and this one caught my eye...

    Callerya megasperma (FABACEAE) Native wistaria

    I've never seen it, or I've walked past it and not seen it. Mauve flowers and another nitrogen-fixer.

    Callicarpa pedunculata (VERBENACEAE) Velvet Leaf - this one looks good.

    The Eleocarpus species have purple berries, big trees. You could probably get a E. grandis towards your dam, reticulatus (not the cultivar) or obovatus, higher up. E.grandis gets some nice big buttress roots when they are older.

    Syzygium oleosum (MYRTACEAE) Blue Lilly Pilly - more purple-ish berries in a bigger tree.
     
  10. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    Wow thanks everyone for those suggestions. I do have some native voilets I can propagate. Strangely when I cleaned out the garden of crappy stuff, I found a sort of lily (I think) tucked away in the corner that has a little purple flower. So nature has started me off for my new garden.:) I'm going to get a native wisteria to climb up the emerald tree that is in the garden.
     
  11. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  12. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Native Lilac Hibiscus
    Alyogyne huegelii

    I scatter a few marigolds
     
  13. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I've always loved the simple, old-fashioned bearded irises. They smell amazing and talk about purple;)
    The butterflies go nuts for zinnia and tithonia, and they are wildly colourful.
    Cosmos. Everything loves every part of it; the sparrows and silvereyes have been eating the seeds all winter.
    The bees love phacelia. It has cool caterpillar purple flowers.
    Bluebells and oldschool scented daffs.
    After smelling daphne wafting over the fence, I can't bear not having it inside and I'll be finding some cuttings!
     
  14. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    ooo stop it you lot! You make me want to garden!
     
  15. hardworkinghippy

    hardworkinghippy Junior Member

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    Annette,

    I'm so sorry about your friend.

    Our flowers are splashed all over the place - wherever I can fit them in the garden. We have tons of food everywhere but the flowers feed our eyes with colour, our hearts with joy and our ears with the buzzing of insects feeding on the nectar or taking the pollen to make honey.

    Nature does the same thing - I just copy that.

    There are some examples here : https://www.flickr.com/photos/hardworkinghippy/sets/72057594064753694/
     
  16. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    Thanks HHH. Your place is so beautiful and inspiring!
     
  17. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day annette

    Likewise, sorry about the passing of your friend.

    Don't forget Lavender Lavandula spp. ssp & vars.

    and

    Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis

    Both are planted extensively throughout our site.

    Benefits/uses include:

    Medicinal

    Culinary

    Perfumery

    Pollinatory

    and, of course

    Beauty

    Cheerio, Mark
     
  18. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    Thanks Mark

    She was my best friend and breast cancer sadly ended her life far too soon. She was an artist and the most wonderful person ever and so i will try and make this garden in that vane. It has to appeal to all the senses and so lavender and rosemary will be good. It is like a microcosm of planning in detail so that it is just right for her and it is only a small area. Rosemary for remembrance is lovely. All the suggestions are in there in my planning. Just hope I can do her justice.

    cheers
    Annette
     
  19. adiantum

    adiantum Junior Member

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    Tibouchina is a wonderful purple, which I doubt I can grow here. My current favorite is Salvia guaranitica, which comes in both blue and purple. Both are over the top intense, and wonderful for the hummingbirds (don't think they have those in AU and NZ)....
     
  20. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Heartsease for obvious reasons.
    Also violas are also being investigated for their anti-cancer properties [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Lots of purple foliage plants (perilla) interested in those?
     

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