Flower suggestions for next to my veggies

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by kaviare, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. kaviare

    kaviare Junior Member

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    I'm planning on planting some flowers in a raised bed near my planned mandala garden. It will be a dedicated flower bed (at least to start!) and I am planting native shrubs and flowers in teh front garden. I want some pretties, ideally some that would be good as cut flowers occasionally. I am on the Adelaide plains, it doesn't get too cold or frotsy usually, but summer can be a bit of a stinker.

    I've especially got an eye out for things that attract insects or other good garden buddies. I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions that they would like to share? Or good resources for planning a year-round flowering garden?

    Along the fences I am going to plant a couple of passionfruits as well as a climbing rose of some sort, and jasmine (it really isn't summer without that smell). I totally adore poppies, tulips and ranaculas, but I'll choose double-function over single, if anyone has any better suggestions.

    What are your floral favourites?
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Nasturtiums and marigolds. Both are edible, are used as companion plants for insect control and are easy to grow.
     
  3. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Occupation:
    Farm manager/ educator
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    Hunter Valley New South Wales
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    Climate:
    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    Pot maraglods (calendula) and cosmos , and hearth ease(johny jumpups) red clover (fixes nitrogen)
     
  4. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Madiera Daisies and Marguerite daisies make nice low informal or clipped windbreak hedge around gardens.
    grow easy from cuts, quick growing, easy to prune by swinging a sharp knife through it or break with hands.
    fantastic food source for adult predator incects- hoverfly,lacewing etc.
    Arctotis- groundcover, daisy fls, very tough.

    Echium fastuosum - low windbreak, bee food

    Kniphofias- nectar for birds and bees, fibre for baskets and stuff.

    Salvia spp. bees, some for 'tea'- I have about 30 species and cultivars ...there are some brilliant colours amongst them

    atm I have Cleome, Cosmos, Tagetes, sunflowers and Zinnias amongst my veg patch.

    look at local gardens to see what grows really well in the climate and then find multiple uses for them.
    be creative with it
     
  5. ezylala

    ezylala Junior Member

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    I strongly agree with you eco4560.. i love marigolds though i hate it's stingy smell ..:D
     
  6. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Marigolds - .
    Tagetes spp. have the stinky smell

    Tagetes minuta- 'Stinking Roger' is a bit of a weed in wetter areas along the east coast Aust.
    said to be good at controlling namatodes.

    Tagetes lemmonii has a nice aroma, kind of like melon, and passion fruit , a hint of citrus and jelly baby lollies...
    ... thats the best i can do to describe it right now.

    grows to about 1metre high , from seed or cuttings
    single flowers about 2-3 cm across.

    It may have simmilar root exudates to the other species, that may help control root feeding nematodes.
     
  7. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    biodiversity, biodiversity! Get as good an array as you can. I have good luck with interspersing herbs. Purple sage is a pretty one. Agastache has fabulous-smelling leaves, is drought tolerant. Catnip, when it blooms brings in the most amazing array of insects! It reseeds, but is easily thinned out. Alyssum is tough and tolerant, the insects love it. And if you like blues and purples, there a blue salvia, blue asters, purple penstemon. And if it gets crazy hot, I put out little kids' umbrellas for shade, to stop the stress. Then I don't overwater and things start to get rangy. They're cute and not expensive. You can wire them to bamboo poles, or just lay them on their sides if it isn't windy. It's always fun to put a few giant sunflowers in the back. :)
     
  8. hardworkinghippy

    hardworkinghippy Junior Member

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    Kaviare,

    Just take Sweetpea's advice and plant as much as you can wherever you have space. Use the flowers to disguise plastic or iron, cover trellises to give shade, attract pollinating insects, feed your chickens the seeds, wonderful perfumes to give you pleasure....

    It's so good to hear people talking about flowers for a change !

    Here's some of ours - mostly double or triple function so I don't feel too guilty ! ;-)

    https://lafermedesourrou.blogspot.com/2009/04/romantic-spring-gardens.html

    https://lafermedesourrou.blogspot.com/search?q=star

    Irene
     
  9. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    I love flowers for so many reasons - not least of all because they keep the girls of the house happy, and involved in the garden
     
  10. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Yep and Food for the soul...
     
  11. pumpkin

    pumpkin Junior Member

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    Favourites and mostly good pest attracting are: cosmos, lavender, salvias, penstemon, easter daisy, alyssum, snapdragons and pansies.

    I let a few carrots go to flower as well. They are really pretty and attract the good bugs as well.
     
  12. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    HardWorkingHippy, your blog is so nice, and inspirational. How do you keep the deer away from your flowers? Especially the banksia rose? My roses are eaten to the ground by them. And when you are doing your hugelkultur, are you heaping dirt on your wood trenches by hand?

    and I absolutely agree about the importance of having beauty to look at. I have felt so overwhelmed by the practicality and workload at my farm, I just gave up any kind of landscape for pleasure. I love my native landscape, but I do love flowers. they felt so frivolous, but everywhere I looked it was practicality and seriousness of getting plants up and productive. Then I started planting gladiolus and daffodils around the fruit trees to stop the gophers, and suddenly those cheerful, gorgeous flowers felt so good to look at! Even when things went terribly wrong, with deer eating everything, raccoons breaking through fences, gophers eating roses until they fell over, mice eating pea seeds...those bobbing, luscious flowers and their amazing colors always made me feel better! And now that I'm working on biodiversity, I'm tossing out seeds of dozens of flowers and herbs, so the whole area ought to change for the better! they are going to have to make it on their own, I can't fuss over them, but it will be a fun experiment to find out which ones do well, and not too much extra work. :)
     
  13. kt6382

    kt6382 Junior Member

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    Hiya, I'm also after pretty flowers, preferably blues, purples or whites to fill my flowerbeds and attract bees to my garden. Trouble is I also need them to be safe / non toxic to rabbits as I have two pet bunnies that I often let roam the garden.
    I know things like roses, lavendar, marguerite, campanula, strawberry are safe but I need some things that are low maintainence that I can put in and will spread a little and bulk up my currentl very grassy flowerbeds. Someone has bought us a penstemon(?) and I want to plant that out but I don't know if its safe for bunnies???
    I've heard that sage and rosemary and several other herbs are safe.. which of these would look good and survive in flowerbeds? Thanks for any advice :)
     
  14. kt6382

    kt6382 Junior Member

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    Oops, just seen this is a REALLY old thread... was just hunting for info on penstemon!
     
  15. jaden62

    jaden62 New Member

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    kt6382 - So far I haven't been able to kill rosemary or sage, & both of them are THRIVING on neglect. If you visit around any Defence establishments in Australia, you will see Rosemary growing everywhere. It is generally not fussed over, it's often just "shorn back" once or twice a year. It attracts bees like mad. Sage is a member of the salvia family & will attract all of the insects that love that. My sage also attracts bees like mad. So do my Stevia & Basil, but they like a little more pampering than Sage & Rosemary, though Basil does self-seed in my garden.
     
  16. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    This may sound glib, but my favorite, after much thought is the next plant I find. Biodiversity is the key, never limit yourself.
     
  17. kt6382

    kt6382 Junior Member

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    Thanks for your reply, I def need to investigate Sage and Rosemary... It seems most people on here are from Australia so the plants success may be different... I'm on south coast of England.
     

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