eggshell surplus

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by pebble, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    I have more eggshells than the worms can cope with. Any ideas on what use I can make of them? I don't have chooks or other animals so can't use the shells for them.
     
  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    We have the wwoofers grind ours in a mortar and pestle on rainy days then we use it in the compost or just straight on the beds as a source of calcium for the soil and so the plants- long term.
     
  3. butchasteve

    butchasteve Junior Member

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    i don't have worms or chooks.. i just put them in the compost, not even ground.. it'll be available eventually to go back into the system..
     
  4. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    I took some soil from the worm farm today and it was full or avocado skins, pumpkins seeds, and egg shells. I can just toss them in the garden, or put them through the worm farm again, but I thought there might something else I could do. I've heard about soaking egg shells in a bucket of water and using that to water plants.

    No woofers ;-)
     
  5. grassroots

    grassroots Junior Member

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    Grinding egg shells in a hand mincer works really well. At the moment I am microwaving them(to get rid of any bacteria), then putting them in my aquaponics system to keep the ph at the optimal level
     
  6. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    I always noticed a ton of dust when Ii tried to grind up egg shells electrically, and since the pieces are in shards, the dust would be, too, not to great to inhale :)

    But I let them dry out, crumble them and put them on my paths in the garden. As I walk they get incorporated into the soil. They disappear in a couple of weeks in my heavy clay. I think egg shells have to be under the dirt, not on top, for any hope of them contributing in my lifetime. I had an old compost pile that I abandoned, went back to it a couple years later, there was a pile of the most beautiful perfect compost, and egg shells....untouched! You'd think that the best microbiology for breaking them down would be in a compost pile, but they just sat there. So I suspect it will take them being really buried to break down to the microscopic size that will do plant roots any good.
     
  7. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Last time I emptied the worm farm, there was a whole egg in there, completely intact.

    Maybe I need to soak them in vinegar water and see what happens. If the vinegar extracts much of the calcium and other minerals, will the rest of the shell be more easily broken down? What else is there apart from the minerals?
     

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