Edible boundry hedge

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Mishka, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. Mishka

    Mishka Junior Member

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    Looking for suggestions for an fast growing attractive edible hedge for our property boundry - It needs to be very dense to provide, pravacy, security and road noise reduction. But I'm also trying to avoid anything overly appealing that may invite havesting by passers-by

    The two best ideas I've come up with so far are: Coffee trees or Elberberry bushes.

    Any other suggestions would be very welcome
     
  2. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Mishka,

    If you can grow coffee, you can grow prickly pear, a cactus that has edible pads (we eat them stir fried with other things....) It is used as a semi barrier. It is not as prickly as its name suggests, and while edible, it is not going to attracvt most people....

    We have just tried establishing a row next to the fence with Surinam Cherry interplanted to make a hedge and as a boundary to keep the the grass out....

    C
     
  3. seussrules

    seussrules Junior Member

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    Um, Chris, Prickly Pear is categorised as a noxious weed in most Australian states. Not sure where Mishka's from, though...?
     
  4. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Hi Suess,

    Ooops! :oops: I learn new things every day..... prickly pear, a nxious weed.... who'dathunkit? Um, well, it works here, no signs of being invasive.... but perhaps that is because it is from the Americas?

    Mishka, it might not be appropriate for you, but, it works here (noxious weed? Man, i thought that was that really bad weed from Mexico... man...)

    C
     
  5. Rob6014

    Rob6014 Junior Member

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    I would go with the elderberry. They are tough as old boots, are dense, very attractive, the flowers can be used to make wine or cordial/syrup and the berries make a wonderful jam/jelly. Mine are just starting to fruit and I'm going to try elderberry wine from the berries this year. Cheers.
     
  6. bella

    bella Junior Member

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    Where are you located, approx, Mishka?

    Bel
     
  7. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    I would consider Bambusa blumeana to be the premier choice of hedge plant for this purpose into the new global millenium. It has thorns that will deter any intruder short of a D5 bulldozer that gor wlow down, and yet it has a tender edible young shoot. The mature canes have timber quality characteristics, and it is good cattle fodder. Hands down!
     
  8. Mishka

    Mishka Junior Member

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    Mount Tamborine, Queensland. 600m elevation, sub-tropical/temperate totally frost-free winters, 1700mm rainfall, good volcanic basalt loam earth
     
  9. dryland dweller

    dryland dweller Junior Member

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    Chris do a google on prickly pear in Oz it coverd thousands of acres in the 20's and 30's but they brought in the cactoblastis beetle and it is now under control. You have the beetle there and thats why it isnt a weed I guess
    Pete
     
  10. bella

    bella Junior Member

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    There are various types of lilypillies (lilly pilly?) which may do, like the Riberry? The fruits are generally only considered edible by birds, but have had nice jams etc from them... There are so many.

    I have a tree called "Australian Bush Cherry" here that has grown really fast (through a dry, dry winter too). It's very dense, brances quite close to the ground (unlike the images I found when I googled it)... I bought it thinking it'd grow to around 4m, but after researching I'm thinking it'll be aiming for 10-20m+ if we don't keep it trimmed. It's a great looking tree. Haven't tried the fruit yet. I wonder if the Magenta Cherry would be suitable for you?

    Bamboo?

    Neem? Not edible but useful and fast. Though a friend said it's on its way to being declared a pest in Qld, is that right? I don't have one myself.

    Native gingers? Not tall, but amongst other plants they sure grow fast and fill in the gaps.

    My sweet leaf bushes, self sown close together, are rather dense. Sweet leaf leaves are yummy.

    I have a wish-list from browsing https://www.daleysfruit.com.au but will talk with my local tropical fruit nurseryman first. ;) He gives free taste-testing samples :razz:

    Let us know what you choose, how close you plant and so on!
    Bel
     
  11. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    Neem, a pest? How long before the DPI (department of primary industries) is declared a pest in QLd, that's what I'd like know... (insert rolling eyes dude here.
     
  12. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Richard,

    We have heard Neem can be invasive, too, and have seen photos of aggressive seedlings under neem trees, but we don't have that problem...

    Pete,

    Yeah, I think that we have anough other things growing and high enough humidity and soil moisture that other things grow faster than prickly pear here. Also, I think it is native to Mexico and was introduced (Dawns theory, but not sure...)

    I imagine it would be a real bitch to get rid of... with lots of roots from every piece touching the ground, resistent to drought, prolly resistent to chemicals (wouldn't know... :lol: ), and, to top it off, prickly!

    We eat it, not everyday, or even every week, but it adds bulk and a slight tartness to a stir fry...

    Our major invsive is a grass that gets into disturbed areas, and has adventitious roots, propagates from cuttings and from the prolific seed heads.... and we call it "bad grass", and feed it to our guinea pigs... who doi not put a noticable dent in the problem... but goats should happen this year, which will help.

    Mishka, consider the lovely Surinam cherry! If it is invasive, you'll be in good shape! Lovely fruit, high in vtamin C, birds love it, makes nice juice, nicer jam, and good raw....

    C
     
  13. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    Edible hedge

    Mishka.
    Like Bella said, please do keep us informed as to what you choose and why. I am also considering putting in hedges in various places so am watching this post with strong interest....
     
  14. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Mishka,

    Ditto what heuristics said!

    C
     

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