Eco's Lodge

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by eco4560, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Lets see if I can remember them all -

    Wampi, mulberry (purple), blueberry, bay (not a fruit tree I guess...), Kaffir lime, tropical nectarine, coffee, tahitian lime, cherry guava, carambola, lemonade, grapefruit, orange (sorry can't remember which sort), mandarin, lemon, pomegranate, cumquat, macadamia (also not a fruit tree!), Davidson's plum, and another native plum that I forget the name of, lychee, finger lime, avocado, olive, custard apple, loquat, banana (ladyfinger about 8 with new suckers popping up!), jaboticaba, fig, tamarillo, feijoa, achacha, vanilla bean, star apple (caimito or something like that), blue quandong, lemon myrtle (also not a fruit tree!), about 8 paw paws, passionfruit (fruit but not a tree), pepino, curry tree (also not really a fruit tree!). There are 3 mangos hanging over the fence line but they don't officially belong to me. Most are too small to have started fruiting yet, but I should be well fed in a few years time.

    2 chokos and a partridge in a pear tree!

    I'll have a look on my house plans tonight and give you some more info on the roof.
     
  2. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    There's a few there i haven't heard of. wampi, achaacha. ...Oh well two. I'll check them out. Thanks for the other thing.
     
  3. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Yes it's polycarbonate sheeting. It is corrugated just the same as my zincalume roof and sits in a gap in the zincalume held on with roofing screws. There's something on the plan referring to span deck profile - I think that has something to do with the type of corrugation. It's about 1.7 m x 1.5 m directly over my bathtub so I can lie in it and look at the sky. Keeps the mould down too. It was part of the house build so I have no idea what individual component cost.
    It's on the southern side of the house with the roof sloping to the south so during the day it only gets indirect light. If you had direct light getting in where you are I think you could put buckets of water out and charge people top use your sauna....
    I can't imagine it is very strong so I would worry about having a WHOLE roof made out of it, but you might be able to use smaller segments like I have done to bring the light in rather than fancy sky lights. My architects specialize in "green" designs so if yours is threatened by your ideals let me know - you could always contact mine and see what they can do for you. They do straw bale and owner builder designs so they are used to demanding customers!

    Here's the achacha info - Garcinia Humilis
    There's a basic run down on the wampi here - wampi It is tropical so it should go nuts at your place. I have never tried the fruit so I don't know what it is like. But I figure when the system as we know it collapses anything edible will be worth having.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I found a daggy photo of that section of the roof from during the build. I've used up my photo allowance so I can't post it here, and it's too ugly to put on photoblog. Pm me your email addy and I can send it to you.
     
  5. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    Thanks for that. And i don't think its a daggy photo. It shows pretty well what it looks like. The stars might be a bit blurry but its good to see the trees. It helps me visualise what I would be able to see through my roof - which is a lot. I think this stuff is laserlite.
     
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I'm heading off on holidays for 2 weeks, leaving tomorrow. I'm going cold turkey from the internet for the WHOLE time - it's a bit of a challenge and I may need to substitute alcohol for the message board to get through it.
    Be well people while I'm away. See you after Christmas!
     
  7. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    You won't even think about us. You will have a great time.
     
  8. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Wampee are not really tropical ....

    Easy growing tree , that produces small bunches of brown fruits with a delightful sub-acid flesh .

    Native to Asia they tolerate light frosts , and should grow well down to Melbourne with some protection for the first year.
     
  9. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Holiday snaps are here!
    They are worth a look - I've got some good garden shots in there, and some building ones. Sunburn - I reckon you should build your house like this....
     
  10. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Last update for 2010....

    Mum came over and helped me in the garden. Lately I've been feeling that it is starting to escape from under my control and that if I don't pull ALL the weeds out right NOW, and made it look pretty then something bad will happen and I'll regret it forever. So I roped Mum in to help me try to make a dint on it.

    But when I sat down and crystallised my thoughts on paper about what REALLY needed to happen first the plan evolved somewhat. And I was given a copy of Annette McFarlane's Successful Gardening in a Warm Climate, which I started reading last night. Fancy starting a book with compost first! I LIKE that woman. Anyway it helped to refocus my brain on the fact that planting stuff is infinitely more useful in the big scheme of things than pulling stuff out, if you want to not have empty spots full of weeds. I was also getting a bee in my bonnet about some rice bean that popped up from seed dropped last season that wasn't where I really wanted it to be. I decided to call it a green manure, but seeing how rampantly it had grown in the past 2 weeks had me itching to pull it all out NOW! The book reminded me that I can wait until I see flowers start to appear without panicking that I'll have it there forever, and of course it's a ground cover helping to keep the weeds down, keep the soil cool and fix nitrogen....

    So what DID we get up to today? I decided to play to one of Mum's strengths AND stick to the plant stuff don't yank it out rule. Mum is a day lily nut and brought me about 100 day lilies that she propagated herself when I first moved in and helped me plant them in clusters of 6 - 8. I don't think a single one died and they are just starting to get past their best in terms of flower production for the season. Where each flower starts from then turns into a new baby plant - so we cut spent flower heads, and tidied up the little pups ready to replant. There were a LOT! My daughter came and joined us so we had the whole tribe of women gathered chatting over the pile with a pair of secatuers each.
    My frog pond needs more strappy leaf plants around it to stop toads getting in - which was the perfect use for the new planting material. My son and myself moved about 10 barrow loads of compost to make a raised ring around the pond and we planted them really densely around the pond. If half of them snuff it it'll still be a nice impenetrable barrier. I also lifted a strelitzia that I had planted by the house that didn't like the shade, divided it into 3 and added it to the bed - to add some height. Lemon grass was tucked in as well. I have a long row of lemon grass plants that I used to use to define my northern boundary - but since the FENCE went in seems pointless having them there and they are suffering a bit with the shade the fence makes.
    We managed to pull out some of the more annoying weeds on the way around the garden, and tucked a few day lilies in to replace them instead. A generous amount of green waste made it to the compost pile, which I've now covered with wet newspaper.
    The next job of the day was to tidy up around the chooks. I moved them onto a new bed yesterday that had a VERY successful green manure crop mostly of cow pea - which if course had spilled out all over the edge of the bed. Which is fine but as the chooks eat it it'll start to die off, but only in patches, making little chook sized gaps under the dome to escape from. So we pruned back about a foot from the edge of the dome and I've put some plastic bags full of Singapore Daisy (Yes I'm STILL pulling out SD....) around the edge to make it harder to escape. Now I have a reason to pull out more SD - I need more bags to go all the way around. I also makes it harder for stuff to get in to them. The 3 beds that they are on next were an after thought in the mandala and they aren't perfectly level so the dome doesn't sit quite flat on the ground. I've acquired the cat since the last time they were on this bit of the garden, and I reckon the cat would probably beat a silky given the opportunity. Don't want to find out though.
    To finish off the day we had a cup of chai tea while I collected the eggs and picked beans and corn to go with the roast potato, and a sweet potato bake I made using slices of orange in between the layers of sweet potato with some nutmeg on top. And I passed on a copy of the recent blog on the main page about how to make a compost shower to add to her collection of things that she is posting to the folks at Uepi Island. A hot shower would have been nice from time to time, but not if you have to burn diesel for it.

    Next year I want to make a raised garden bed at my Mum's place as a treat for her. She travels a lot though so it has to look after itself, and have plants that are more perennial than seasonal. She has a pretty good collection of culinary herbs and fruit trees already. I'd like it to have things that she could just go to at any time and dig up, or chop a bit off, and it'd always have something to eat and not need much work. I was thinking about things like arrowroot, cassava and jicama, Ginger, tumeric that whole family - where she can just dig up what she needs and leave the rest to continue. Does anyone have any suggestions for any thing OTHER than root crops that would work? It would have to survive on rain only. Are there any beans that produce all year round that wouldn't die just because she didn't harvest them for a few weeks? Or leafy greens that you could put in a salad or use as a cooked green? Nasturtiums maybe. Even if they died off they'd self seed.

    I did have a moment this year when I thought that it would be a really good idea to plan to enter my place in a garden comp this year, to help focus my attention to keep working on making it actually have a point. It seemed like a good idea for a while, but lately I've been thinking that the problem is that it encourages me to plan for PRETTY, TIDY, NEAT rather than practical, interwoven, and easy - which is a much better idea. I'm hoping that eventually my place will be as nice a hardworkinghippy's place, but it will be a thing of beauty because it had years of looking like an ugly duckling first and matured, not because I bought it a push up bra and hair straighteners for it's birthday. If that makes sense! I started making a garden plan in midwinter of my first year, and updated this winter and it was amazing to see how much had changed. I'll do it again each year. It is a really useful exercise and I'd encourage all the townies to do it. Spending a day or two thinking about what you have done and want to do in the garden is just as important as spending a day or two in your garden.

    Best wishes for whatever the new year holds for all of you out there. My prediction will be for expensive petrol, even more expensive food, expensive electricity and unpredictable weather.
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Chook economics...
    My chooks produced at least 1060 eggs last year. When I was away and someone else was looking after them I didn't make them count.... That's 88 doz eggs, or 2.9 eggs a day.
    I spent $200 on grain for them. That works out at $2.26 a doz. For free range organic LOVED chicken eggs.
    Not bad eh?!
     
  12. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    It never occurred to me to count my eggs. Perhaps I should. How many chickens do you have?

    Are you eating all your eggs? Are you feeding them back to the chickens? I have just decided to start doing this more systematically. We don't eat so many eggs. And as i don't have a lot of spare money it makes more sense to feed the ducks and chickens eggs rather than give them away. I want to try to keep my grain consumption down to 1 22kg bag a month - ie about $20.

    I've just noticed that the feet of my duckings are already bigger than the feet of their mother and aunts. I also noticed that size of the chickens i have raised is larger than the two mothers i bought fully grown from Joe. Joe keeps all his animals in a pen (large and good though) and gives them grain and scraps. Mine freerange and I think i am feeding them a lot more grain. Also when they were chickens he doesn't give them baby food like I have been doing.
     
  13. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Seven chickens (4 are silky bantams). I give my eggs away to friends in return for kitchen scraps to feed the chooks.
     
  14. Linda Thompson

    Linda Thompson Junior Member

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    what a joy.

    Hey Eco, that was a real joy to read....I was so taken by the family getting together and the simplicity of the flow of events that occured....I have known all along what I want to do on "my dream about to be realised" peice of dirt but you have just confirmed every thing I have been thinking...plan, plant, wait, look, share, taste, potter, rethink and remember... I guess thay are all the words that sum up the easy life that we all strive for in our gardens and your post reminded me of what it is that I am striving for on my peice of dirt... thankyou for sharing
    :clap::clap::clap::clap:
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Aww shucks Linda! I'm pleased that someone is excited by it. I'm certainly having fun doing it.
     
  16. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Things to be grateful for in the garden.

    New photos here! There are 5 days in a row.

    Will post something in the next few days...
    Time to hit the road and head to Cooroy for the Permaculture Noosa Meeting! See you later....
     
  17. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    the link doesn't work eco.
     
  18. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
  19. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Thanks guys!
     
  20. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    I enjoyed catching up on the bounty of your garden. I don't feel so bad about my sweet potato taking over my vegie patch now. i see its the same at your place. I haven't been looking for any to eat though perhaps there are some there somewhere. Perhaps i should look.

    What do you do to your bananas? Mine are slow and right now they are sitting in sodden ground. How old are yours?
     

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