Eco's Lodge

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by eco4560, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ta sunburn. How big does the kang kong get? Is it like silver beet, or more like Vietnamese mint when it grows?
     
  2. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  3. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2003
    Messages:
    1,585
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey that might be a good aquaponic vege to try one day
     
  4. abdullah

    abdullah Junior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    eco did you find out what your 'wild tobacco' was?

    6 years ago i was at a tobacco farm, before they stopped growing it down here, funnily enough i remember chestnuts, deer and blackberries more than tobacco... anyway.
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Still haven't had a definite answer on that one!
     
  6. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
  7. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Apple of Sodom! Where do they come up with these names!!! Yes that looks like it - though I didn't wait long enough to see if it would set fruit before I chopped the last plant back to the base. It's a solanum so I was at least half right as it is in the same family as the tobaccos.
     
  8. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The weather is starting to affect my gardening time... I have to come in for a few hours through the middle of the day as it it getting too hot. My arms are pink, and I have very noticeable lines marking where my shorts end, and where my shoes start.

    Compost has been the theme for the past few weeks. Lots and lots of compost. Love the stuff, can't have too much of it! I had one BIG pile at the bottom end of the hill that was made with 4 star pickets and palings - with inspiration from the Purple Pear tomato stake 5 sided one. It was about 2 months old. After the first one of these was a bit of a failure I thought that it would be best to turn it over to keep it alive. So I stuck in another 4 star pickets just under the banana (I think it will enjoy the leaching nutrients) and turned the old pile into this. It's much better rotted than the first pile was, but around the edges there were still big balls of dried grasses and twigs. I've tried to get them into the middle and the better rotted stuff to the outside.

    A trio of kookaburras was watching with much interest and now I often seem them sitting on or close by to this heap. There were a lot of worms, but I suspect they are reducing the population a bit!

    With the empty space I started a new compost pile. This one has - some of the not so good dry compost from my first attempt, green weeds (I now realise that if I run out of weeds it'll be a sad day for compost making!), scrunched up newspaper, horse stable poo with wood shavings in it, kitty litter when I clean the tray, straw (from bales that were used to start a new raised garden bed - they are starting to break down and have worms in them), mushy compost (keeps the moisture in nicely) and worm castings (the end product of my Singapore Daisy eradication program). It's about 1 m high now - it is rotting down almost as fast as I am filling it.

    I bought a new Aerobin. My previous one was about 4 years old and had been damaged by the removalists when I moved - which was a pity because the cost a packet! I used it as my "end product" bin, because it has the handy hatches at the bottom so I can get a bucket of compost out without having to dig over a whole pile. I emptied the contents out of one of my plastic compost bins into it - this lot was several months old and had been turned and turned and looks great. The other plastic bin I'm now using to follow the chooks on their rotation. The chooks got moved today - and the bin gets plonked down between the newly vacated bed and the newly occupied one. I use a rake to scratch up all the bits off the top of the empty bed, complete with a smattering of chook poo, and put that into the bin, and then dug over the previous pile and topped the bin up to the brim. The chooks got a LARGE tub of the middle well rotted bit of the pile, sending them into raptures of delight as they fought over the worms and wee creepy crawlies. It's sort of like Linda Woodrows compost beds in the mandala, but neater and a smaller footprint. I can plant into the small amount of compost that is left on the ground.

    I've had a planting spree over the past 2 weeks - about 20 pigeon pea. I'll need them once I run out of weeds to compost! A much sought after Tamarillo tree (my son loves them), and 2 red bisexual paw paws. Along the fence I've made mounds of mushy compost and into each pile I've put a pigeon pea, a bean (snake, Madagascar, yam so far), and either a Spaghetti melon or a Turkish Turban pumpkin. I figure one will head up the fence, the other down the hill and the pigeon pea will sit in the middle. It's a LONG fence and I'm still germinating more things to grow on it. I already snuck in 2 chokos which are starting to take off, a hardenbergia, and 2 gourds. I'm planning on cucumber to grow up it as well, and watermelon, rockmelon, zucchini and squash.

    In the mandala I've planted a circle of spuds right in the middle (I'll leave them all there until the chooks are ready to go on again and harvest them in the one go - hence they can hide in the centre), surrounded by sunflowers (hoping the beetles that eat the potato will get distracted and not notice the potatoes are under them), eggplant, chilli and capsicum, tomato, lettuce (directly seeded into the bed) and beetroot. Todays bed got a centre circle of a green manure crop which I'll leave for the chooks enjoyment. It's actually a collection of seed that I haven't had luck with, or didn't know what to do with, that wasn't so fresh any more - so I figure this is a nice way to give it one last chance to be useful. I've also spread seed for carrots - a mixture of red and orange ones.

    So what's good in the garden this week? The nectarine is covered in fruit and the netting is keeping the birds off most of them. It is ALMOST ripe - still a bit crunchy, but we have started eating them and they are packed with flavour. My big adolescent boy that rarely leaves his computer can be seen sneaking out to the tree several times a day! There must be over 100 fruit so he can have as many as he likes and there'll still be some for me. I'm harvesting the last of the kohl rabi and fennel that was planted in autumn. I only ended up with 2 silver beet plants (I planted more than that!) and none of the kale survived. But the Warrrigul greens have filled in the gap nicely - they are very prolific. The bed they are in is shady and I think they prefer it that way. A generous handful of it got tucked into shepherd's pie last night along with fresh herbs, and cherry tomatoes. The potato was store bought, but I "hid" a turnip in the mash (the kids won't eat it on it's own) and some of my own sweet sweet potato. The banana is fruiting and I have managed to bag it to keep the bats away. I haven't yet worked out when I should start cutting hands off. When they colour up? The strawberries are still producing good amounts of fruit. It never makes it into the house. Gardener's privilege! The kids baulk at the ones with slug holes in them, but I've mastered the knack of biting that off spitting it at the chooks or the nearest compost pile and eating the rest. Mr Woolworths wouldn't approve.

    Tomorrow I'm off to visit Tulipwood's hubby who is giving me a woodworking lesson. We are making her a chook house. I'm hoping that I still have all my fingers working by Monday morning. I belong to the generation of women who learnt cooking and sewing while the blokes learnt that blokey stuff. Never to late to learn (I hope!).
     
  9. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Fantastic report Eco. That fence will be such an excellent spot once all the plants are going mad over it. My strawberry plant died. I think its too hot now.
     
  10. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Farm manager/ educator
    Location:
    Hunter Valley New South Wales
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    It was great to get the update Eco - how did the wood working go? He is a handy bloke as evidenced by the chook run we built earlier this year.
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I still have all my fingers and only a little bruise on my pinky from missing the chisel with the hammer when knocking out a rebate. I even got to use power tools! The "summer palace" will be magnificent when it is done. We got about half the floor finished before we ran out of supplies and most of the frame before we ran out of sun. I still couldn't contemplate making one myself, but at least I could now cut it as an unskilled labourer on a building site.
     
  12. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    s/e
    Location:
    South Waikato New ZeLeand
    Climate:
    Cool mountain
    Yeah!!!
    You go girl!!!
     
  13. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2003
    Messages:
    1,585
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I had A hammer,Id hammer in the morning de de dum
     
  14. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I spent the morning wandering the garden with my camera in hand. I'm trying to do this once each season. My summer shots start here - Eco's photoblog - if you navigate to the next page there's about 6 more entries with garden photos.
    Everything is green and lush. I planted a water chestnut in the bath tub yesterday - after adding a pile of compost for it to take root in. I'm told you get a LOT of one plant. I bought it from the Permaculture Noosa meeting on Thursday, along with Yacon, Pepino, and Red Bell Pepper. I also picked up seeds for New Guinea Bean, Evening Primrose, Cassia, Bitter Melon, Telegraph Pea and Okra.
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think I have frogs in residence in my new frog pond. There are new noises in the night garden which are decidedly frog like. I haven't seen any frogs yet though.
    Today I spotted a small snake swimming in the pond, poking his / her head into all the cracks. I think IT knows that there are frogs too. Pretty snake - about 75 cm long, as thick as a finger, grey brown with yellow markings. It had disappeared the next time I went to look.

    My cat it turning out to be an excellent mouser. I have NO idea where all the nice hide by day, but he yowls to be let out in the evenings and sometimes returns with a gruesome gift for me. (Look how much I love you! I left you the hindquarters. Would you like me to watch you eat it?)
     
  16. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I forgot to comment last time you posted that bitter melon is not very yummy. Its very attractive but i didn't enjoy eating it. I think i've had it several times in India. Just grow it for its looks i reckon.
     
  17. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2003
    Messages:
    1,585
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    what a great site eco,i even signed up and made a comment on your pics..

    My frog is going great now,and i imported some spawn from some friends in a nearby town,they are now tadpoles albiet very small still..

    Tezza
     
  18. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the heads up sunburn. I got it because it fits in the stuff that grows well around here but I don't have it in my garden yet category. Gotta try everything at least once!

    Thanks Tez - I've shown you mine now you have to show me yours... :blush: Post some pics!

    And the cat caught another mouse tonight - and then released it alive in the kitchen. THAT isn't how it is supposed to work. I managed to catch the mouse but it bit me on the finger and I let it go! It ended up hiding in the garage and the cat went out to hunt for more prey... I hope it finds the mouse in the house before the mouse sets up house!
     
  19. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Come to think of it, down the track i wouldn't mind growing it becuase its such a good looking vegie. I've also got these lovely spikey cucumbers which i am going to try to grow. They taste pretty much like any other cucumber but they are so pretty. These are the sorts of things i would particularly like growing in my food forest. In the vegie patch as i go along, i will confine it to things i like to eat a lot i think.

    Try the New Guinea Bean if you haven't got it yet eco, that is if you have trouble growing zucchinis. It seems to be a very good alternative.
     
  20. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Eco, i was just rereading your first post. You mentioned having a see through roof in your bathroom. Can you tell me all about it please? What material is it? How much did it cost to erect per square metre, if you know? Is this much more expensive than the rest of your roof? I suppose you had it professionally installed. What sort of materials does it have for support? is it wood or steel? or something else?

    The reason i ask is that i am onto my second design for my house and its occurred to me that a transparent roof is almost essential because of the shade of all the trees. I don't like dark houses and obviously it wouldn't be a good thing to have the lights on all the time. So far I've discovered laserlite 2000 which is a type of polycarbonate roofing. Its corrugated rather than flat though and i wouldn't be able to see through it though it would let all the light in. My sister has some flat polycarbonate in their house though its not a roof but a wall panel. Perhaps its the same thing.

    But maybe i could have section that is completely flat and see through.

    Also i noticed you have 40 fruit trees? Is there a list somewhere?
     

Share This Page

-->