drought and climate change

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by hedwig, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    I asked this question some month ago or longer.
    We're in Brisbane - when is this drought expected to be over??

    I read two different things: one says that SE QLD will be rainier (can't believe it) or 40 % drier?

    Doing the right forecast is prestty impostant for example farmers which want to make decisions what trees they're putting in.
     
  2. teela

    teela Junior Member

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    Hey Hedwig,
    I wish I knew the answer to that question. Personally I don't think there is any drought....it's to climate change.
    From now on the human race is in the dark where climate prediction is concerned.
    From now on I reckon we gotta expect the un-expected.
     
  3. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    I cannot tell too much about Australia, but it's dry.
    In Germany this winter didn't take place and we have /had so much severe weathers I never remebered when I was a kid.
    BUring forests in Europe.

    You think simply the weather is now dry due to climate change and itwill stay dry.

    In Australia I think VERY much could be done by planting trees and vegetation. But in QLD they still clear land.
    When they make ner housing in Brisbane they clear all land first and level it (for that reason it looks always so sad) instead of taking only the trees out which must be taken out and protecting the rest.
     
  4. Tamara

    Tamara Junior Member

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    Hi hedwig,

    I don't think this drought is going to end - therefore, we have climate change.

    I would plant trees for dry conditions and use swales, then try some really productive trees that like a drink after they others are established and the dam ar filled enough to ave them if necessary...

    I think a mistake that some farmers make is they farm for the average rainfall and then struggle in the drought. Permaculture says plan for disaster - like a drought that never ends - I farm using the minimum rainfall as my guide and the extra 200-600 is a bonus. But then I grew up in Whyalla which is really dry.

    The bureau of meteorology has good rainfall map - the one below is anomolies in QLD.

    https://www.bom.gov.au/cgi-bin/silo/rain_maps.cgi

    Good luck,
    T
     
  5. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day hedwig,

    you got bette chance of picking the lotterey than you do of picking when a good wet season may come, and when it does come it will take many months of follow up rain and some years of good wet season rain before you could say this drought we had to have is broken.

    seems qld is only second behind tasmania in slash and burn clearing all in the cause of progress and agriculture. yes we should be protecting bio-diversitry habitat and replanting it, no good just planting trees for a system to work it will need to be what was there before, then our bad droughts may no be quiet so severe.

    i've been watching the north lakes vandalism just north of brissy, huge area must be a couple of thousand acres at least involved, they are creating lakes to fit in with the name of the development so lets not get all feel good and soppy about water holdings, it is purely for ascetics and so they can sell some blocks more expesnively as they will have lake views etc.,.

    well right in the middle of their latest haste to develop this wonderously thought out city, there was this little cops of malelucaes oh about 100 meters long and say no mor than 20 meters wide it was a remnent of old growth, well you can guess what i'm going to say? yep they cleared it hey sad that a development so large could not be flexable enough to accomodate a few trees and the bio-diversity that goes with it.

    len
     
  6. arawajo

    arawajo Junior Member

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    If we knew who the developer was and we all sent heartfelt letters - from all over the world - to show we care for even one little group of precious trees - I wonder if it would make them think twice next time?
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    arawajo,

    nah wouldn't help these developers are of a single mind and trees that are growing wild/natural are littel more than weeds or of nuisance value, the rethink needs to come from the regulator down, or i should say from the broader community (most are caught up in their yuppy lifestyle living standard) who for the majority could care less the poor in the community are out of touch as they struggle to exist in the high lifestyle set for them.

    this is but one example, within 1 hour drive along the main highway over the past 8 years a farmer quickly felled 100 or so acres of melalucae bio-diversity to plant pineapples becasue he knew the developers where advancing and bush land doesn't get the same amount of money as does working farm land, yeas houses there now.

    and the gov' cleared hundreds and hundreds of acres of the same sort of bio-diversity and for what you my ask? to plant pine trees of course because the lifestyle people demand wood for building and furniture.

    yes i'd love some sort of responsibilty to emerge before we have absolutley nothing left but housing developments, shopping precicts and industrial estates. if i can see it surely others can also?

    sorry about hijacking your thread 'hedwig' but when/where is it all going to stop???

    len
     
  8. Luisa

    Luisa Junior Member

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    Unfortunately the broad scale tree clearing legislation doesn't apply in urban areas. Don't know how they define "urban" though. But if it's within urban areas, forget it, the only chance is an enlightened developer or a media campaign by a "Friends of" group.
     
  9. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    So we plant date palms.
    Swales are a bit difficult on flat land and we're city dwellers.
    Ipersonally believe in planting lots of trees will change the climate to a wetter one.
    And my believe as well is that it must not always be native tree but fast growing ones.
     
  10. Luisa

    Luisa Junior Member

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    Agree with you re: trees and climate.
    Agree with you re: swales and flat ground.
    Agree with you re: trees in cities.

    But be very careful re: species. Try to stick to local native trees, this means not just native but locally native. There are still plenty which get up quick. White cedars are a good one. I think we need to get canopy back ASAP. With canopy you can shade the ground even without a lot of mulch, they then create micro-climates for smaller plants, air conditioning effect for humans and animals and in cities this is doubly important.

    You are in Brisbane? There is Northey Street City Farm but also the Greening Australia nursery out at The Gap. Very good resource, I have often bought mail order from them for my place and I am just so glad places like it exist. Talk to GA about your situation.
     
  11. Shirley

    Shirley Junior Member

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    We are in Brisbane too. It is the driest I have ever known, went for a drive to Beechmont on the weekend, is usually green there even when it is dry in Brisbane but it is brown and dead there too.

    We are in the situation that we need to get some trees in for shade but the ground is so dry and hard it is impossible to keep anything alive. We are on tank water so it's precious. We have also had quite severe frosts for this area and because there are lots of plants already stressed from the drought I don't think they are going to come back either. When we do get rain we are going to have to try and get some reasonably fast growing trees in to give a canopy to cool things down a bit Lets all hope it comes soon!!!!!!!
     
  12. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    My very personal opinion is - as long as you are in the cities you can but must not stick on natives. Most natives doN't feed you to a bigger extend and you really have top think af the Carbon Dioxide involved to bring food on your table.
    I think we are in a situation were climate change is the real big thread to biodiversity and not some non antive trees in cities. But understand me right I am not against planting native trees!

    My neighbout said that we will have floods after christmas - he's often right with his weather forcasts.
     
  13. Luisa

    Luisa Junior Member

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    Well we're overdue for a flood and there have been signs the drought is easing. A return just to a normal wet season would resemble a flood after the last few years.

    Many native trees have edible fruits. Can't say I eat them! But I have bought a book so's I can learn which ones might be useful. Also they can be used to make compost and feed the soil - peanut trees. etc.
     
  14. Loris

    Loris Junior Member

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    My mango trees are flowering for the first time since 2004! This is supposed to indicate a good season coming. Now if I could only find some emus and count the chicks I could confirm this for you! They're a bit thin on the ground since the drought though.
     

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