Dog food and recycling the cans. Two questions.

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by sun burn, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    Ok the first is, do you feed your cats and dogs canned food? If not what do you feed them. What are your recipes. I do know a good one for dogs but i am interested in your ideas if you do something else.

    What do you feed your cat if not canned cat food. This is more interesting since feeding the cat is my responsibility.

    Secondly if you do use canned food, what do you do with your cans? Normally we send ours out in the recycling bin but further to my idea about garden sculpture I wondered if they'd be better put to use as landfill in my garden. I just wasn't sure if it would be more sound to send them back to recycling and if it was too much of a waste to bury them in my garden. Certainly using the cans as fill and landscaping would be quite a bit easier to manage than other bits of metal we've got lying around here. And there is so far a better supply.

    If its ok to put them in the ground, do you have any tips about it. I mean, i wasn't htinking of bothering to crush them or fill them up with dirt. Just let there be air pockets and i know eventually they will rust down that way. I don't see that as a terrible problem unless its imperative that the new landscaping is totally permanent. I guess it would all take a long time to rust as there is isn't going to be much oxygen down there.
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    I wouldn't put them in the ground, or probably even keep them onsite unless I had a specific good use for them. Most canned food (human too) is lined with a toxic plastic - you don't want that in your environment (I don't know what happens to it in the recycling process, that would interesting to find out). Also, metal is one of the recyclables that generates good amounts of money for waste disposal companies, so it seems ok to me that they get to deal with metals.

    I don't have animals at the moment, but in the past I didn't feed my cat canned food. I bought raw rabbit and other pet food grade whole meat and added in other stuff as appropriate (meat alone isn't enough). It's easier with dogs because they'll eat a wide range of food. I have supplemented with a quality dry food when it's been too labour intensive to access fresh meat, which isn't ideal, but is still way better than canned food. Canned pet food is full of a whole bunch of things that animals really shouldn't have to eat - you can look that up on the internet. For raw petfood recipes google "BARF" (it's a dog food diet).
     
  3. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Let me qualify that post. If you do have the plastic lining of cans on your property, it's best to keep the stable and away from soil and water or other factors that will break them down and release them into the soil and water and air (not sure what sunlight does).
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I use dried cat food only and meat scraps for my cat, who supplements it with the odd mouse. You can use the cans on top of your pawpaw when you cut it back to stop it rotting. I keep thinking that one day I'll get a bunch of cans and punch holes in them in pretty patterns and hang them up with tea lights in them. Probably good for a one off for a dinner party, I don't think I'd use them daily! Make a scare crow out of them by drilling holes in the base and running a wire through?
     
  5. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    That's a nice idea eco about using them as lanterns. I might try that. Normally though i like putting them in bowls of water to float in the table. But tea candles are expensive aren't they. Which makes me think i can make my own by cutting down big cheap candles instead, particularly for use in those lantern cans. I'll have to remember about the paws paws later on. I still haven't got any growing. I love paw paw...

    The cat and dog food can's don't have that plastic inside of them as far as i can see.

    My cat can't eat dried food. He gets a uterine disorder and can't pee, even from the top quality stuff you buy at the vets. However, yesterday i did notice he was enjoying some chicken pellets that i had left out on the table. But that's fair too because the chickens are always trying to get to the cat's food.

    My cat's been eating whiskers all his life and is very healthy so I am not worried about the contents of it. I also give him fresh heart or liver about once a week or some other fresh meat treat.
     
  6. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    Some time ago I purchased, studied and added this publication to my collection:

    Vale, R. & B. (2009) Time to Eat the Dog? The real guide to sustainable living. London: Thames & Hudson.

    Putting the provocative title aside, there is a lengthy section on the pros and cons of keeping pets in terms of embodied energy.

    From the publishers:

    From what we eat and what we wear to how we travel and enjoy ourselves, this book explores the environmental impact of the decisions we take every day of our lives.

    • Between 1950 and 1997, the world’s fish harvest grew from 21 to 120 million tons
    • Golf is considerably better for the environment than owning an Alsatian, but keeping a hamster is better than both
    • Your wedding could consume ten times the energy of your house for one year

    The world and its resources are finite, yet we are seemingly locked into a system based on growth: growth of population, growth of income and growth of consumption. From this irrefutable starting point, Time to Eat the Dog? attempts to uncover what 'sustainability' really means. Robert and Brenda Vale have gathered a wealth of data from sources around the world; from these nuts and bolts, facts and figures, they encourage the reader to 'do the maths' and work it out for themselves.

    The authors do not advocate a mass cull of the world's pets, but some of their proposed solutions are still likely to shock some pet owners. See the article on 'Time to Eat the Dog?' in the Guardian

    This book will make you see your life and your place in the world in a completely new light. Challenging the orthodoxies that underpin our entire economic system, this is one subversive read...

    Robert and Brenda Vale are research fellows at the School of Architecture at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. They are the authors of The Autonomous House, Green Architecture and The New Autonomous House, all published by Thames & Hudson. In 1994 they won the United Nations Global 500 Award for Environmental Achievement.
     
  7. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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    Wash them out and use to store screws, nails, bolts, washers, etc in the shed or if large enough, place over the tops of wooden fence posts - will help stop the tops from splitting.
     
  8. paradisi

    paradisi Junior Member

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    for the food part of your question - we use the chilled tubes of food - cut them into about a one day food parcel for the dogs and freeze them

    pretty good food

    they get suppliments int he way of dried kibble always being available and occassional eggs and fresh vegies
     

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