Do you make cheese?

Discussion in 'Recipes & Remedies' started by pippimac, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I get great raw milk, I've done a cheesemaking course and made a couple of batches, but the requirement for what I consider obsession-level hygiene is offputting.
    Does anyone make cheese regularly with less than entirely-scrupulous hygiene? I get the impression that it's pure luck if you don't end up with some really nasty batches.
    Are any varieties less 'sensitive'? I have visions of cooked-curd cheese like haloumi being less...prone...but maybe that's wishful thinking.
     
  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    I mainly do a Colby Pip - and would say that the hygiene is not extrodinary. The results vary from time to time but all have been good cheese. These are done with raw milk and without pasturizing or even raising to 80/90 degrees just to 30 for the culture. I also make panir and ricotta from the colby whey and have only once had a failure. It was a panir that didnot stay toghther when fried but that may have been due to overheating of the milk.
     
  3. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    I know nothing about making cheese but i wonder if the hygiene obsession is in order to get predictable results each time.
     
  4. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    From what regular cheese-makers have told me, the worry's more about getting bugs in the batch which make it revolting and inedible.
    I certainly don't mind if the cheese is always different, in fact I'd be worried if it wasn't!
    Right, I'm going to make feta, then ricotta, then cook some feta in the whey and make haloumi.
    Then I'll have a crack at a cheddar -style cheese
    Dodgy-cheese-beasts come if you may. Practice is what I need, and being intimidated by the hygeine malarky isn't getting me anywhere.
     
  5. JoH

    JoH Junior Member

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    I am really careful as the incubation temp is perfect for all types of bugs. I just keep the cheesemaking stuff pretty clean, sterilise by soaking before use and wash my hands regularly - I dont spring clean my kitchen or wear a hair net!. (I did draw the line the day my dog managed to stick his nose (bearded dog) in my curd! - that one got the biff)
     
  6. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    Anyway I envy you all that you can do this. Neither my cat, nor dog, nor chickens, nor ducks, are producing milk so they only way i can have a chance of doing this is if i convince my neighbours to put a cow or a goat on their lovely patch of grass. I think the wife might be keen but the husband baulks at every good idea.
     
  7. DonHansford

    DonHansford Junior Member

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    All this modern requirement for stainless steel and absolute hygiene begs the question ... Haven't humans been making this stuff for millenia? If there was a propensity for it to go putrid without strict cleanliness, would it have become such a widespread practice? Most food preservation processes require certain steps to be taken, but remember that disinfectants, anitibacterial solutions and bleaches, etc are modern innovations. I remember watching Grandma hand-churning butter, then knocking it into shape using two wooden paddles, on a wooden carving board that was used for all the other tasks a carving board was used for (meat, bread, veggies, etc). Come to think of it, the butter was stored in a cupboard at room temperature most of the year, only in summer did it go into the meat safe.

    Showing my vintage again :D
     

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