Deep Planting

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Terra, May 11, 2010.

  1. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Has anyone had success with deep planting overgrown seedlings , ive had great results with Tomatoes which is a well known method with them . Wondering if other veggies will work too .
    Rob
     
  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    We deep plant brassicas by removing the dicots and planting up to that level - it allows for more rooting and a stable plant with greater capacity to uptake nutrients.
    hope that helps
     
  3. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    I have used this tek with trees.
    The general rule is that if the species in question is able to be grown by cuttings or layering,
    or will grow adventitious roots, then it's probably a safe bet that this method will be ok for it.
    one thing to keep in mind though is the soil type combined with watering regime.
    you might have to be very careful with some species until they got going.
    It can be used to advantage in dry climate for obvious reasons.

    Tomato, tomatillo, capsicum, potato, many herbs, Maize,
    sugarcane, bamboo and other grasses, cucurbits, legumes ...

    some things are better grown from seed, but probably anything of the vegetables
    that you'd normally transplant from a punnet that grows a stem should be ok.
    Things that stay as a rosette eg. parsley you wouldnt want to plant too deep or the crown could rot.

    cassava (though i find that shallower planting makes for easier harvest), taro, ok.

    As far as fruit trees go
    figs, quince ,mulberries, pomegranate, guavas and feijoa should be ok I'd imagine

    The list could be quite a long one.
     
  4. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Thanks for the prompt reply i have some cauliflowers that i will try they have got quite long and i was worried they would flop over after planting . I have had great success with trees also , planted some sugar gums up the back of the farm where there was basically no trees at all in may last year by conventional methods and they have done quite well with 6 summer waterings . As a trial after seeing the longstem planting article on the ABC i dug holes with a posthole digger and planted overgrown sugargums down 12 inches results are astounding , planted 4 months after the others and they have easily 10 times the leaf canopy and 3 times as high with only 3 summer waters may not work in all soil types but this area is 2 feet of sandy loam over clay so the problem is getting thier roots down and established .
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    PP the dicots are the first 2 leaves? Is that right?
     
  6. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    yes Eco - not real leaves but the first two to emerge from the seed. We did River red gums and they worked really well and I think Cassurina would be good too.
     
  7. butchasteve

    butchasteve Junior Member

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    long stem planting works particularly well with gums. particularly those that have been in tubestock too long.

    i usually cut the lower branches leaves off and put the tree in 6inches deeper than the rootline. the idea is that the rootball will grow larger before the rest of the tree. give em a dose of seasol when planting and you will notice a massive difference in health of the gum over the first few years, and then the growth after that is exceptional..

    do a test, plant one gum normally and another with this method. you will notice the difference.. although be warned that soil with too high OM content can lead to stem-rot or infection rather than root growth.
     
  8. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Actually dicots are a type of plant that have 2 cotyledons that are part of the embryo within the seed of a plant that may become the embryonic leaves, baby leaves. Dicots are also distinguished by their leaf type (network type structure), stem type (ring-shaped vascular bundles) and tap roots. Whereas monocots have only 1 cotyledon, parallel veins in their leaves, fibrous roots and soft, scattered vascular stem structure. I think he means plant up to the embryonic, baby leaves, which usually don't look like the true leaves of the plant.

    I haven't tried that with the bassicas, but that sounds like a good idea!

    You don't want to plant grafted trees so deep that you cover up the graft of the root stock, or it will rot. Any plant, for that matter, that is grafted, should always have the graft facing the sunny side and be a palm's width up from the ground. I just got some mulberries that were grafted, I couldn't believe it.

    A lot of fibrous, shallow rooted perennial herbs and fruits really hate being planted deeply. Blueberries often won't make it, and rosemary, lavender need to be where the soil dries out some between waterings.

    It really depends on the growing characteristics of the plants. :)
     
  9. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Thanx Sweet Pea - I call them the seed leaves, but I don't know if that is the "proper" terminology - the first 2 out of the seed.

    And I'm confused - Ianpeterson from the Group for banned users? What't that about?!
     
  10. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    Recently, I deep planted cabbage, cauliflower and silver beet seedlings which I raised (and had become a bit long and leggy) they are looking quite happy and healthy.

    Regarding "Ian peterson from the group for banned users" .. that account was posting vaguely related comments in many of the threads with a website link to something unrelated. I think it was deemed a spam account. (the link has been removed)
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    That explains it. I was hoping it was some kinda secret society like the Permcrasy mob that I could join....
     
  12. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Must be renegades!! :)
     

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