Damage Control: Bendigo Tornado

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by permaculture.biz, May 28, 2003.

  1. permaculture.biz

    permaculture.biz Junior Member

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    Hi Jeff,



    Thanks for the surprise package – I gave them all to the local permaculture nursery to propagate as they have the facilities etc. Then they will be distributed accordingly. Just a question on the respective propagation techniques involved - what are the methods?



    What other interesting stuff have you got on the tree seed front??



    As for the damage report – well just heard on the radio that 174 houses (+ cars, sheds etc.) were effected in a very small area – with $100 000 000 in total insurance claims – seems a bit high for the area – anyway no doubt our policy will now increase. It was a wild old night – quite strange with continuous rolling thunder and showers coming in from the NW – an odd direction for fronts to come from (normally SW winter and NE summer) – hence the event resulting from warm air coming in from the inland. Apparently the tornado started off as a small williwilli and then became a full blown Cat 2 tornado. I went for a reconnaissance the other day to inspect the path and damage and it took quite a direct route starting before a distinct low ridge then continuing into a broad valley where it fizzed out – and quite abruptly looking at the debris and tree damage. Some houses had their roofs taken clear off and then next door no visible damage. Anyway Euc. cladocalyx was the least capable of handling the brunt with Cas. Cunninghamiana a clear winner apart from torn branches.



    Cheers,



    Yours and Growing,



    Darren J. Doherty

    Applied Diploma of Permaculture Design, (Education, Site Design, System Establishment & Implementation) Permaculture Institute (1995)

    Permaculture Design Certificate, Permaculture Institute (1993, 1995, 2001)

    Whole Farm Planning Certificate (Train the Trainer), University of Melbourne (1995)

    principal consultant permaculture.biz
     
  2. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    Good to hear you're safe Darren.
    I wonder how many folk in Bendigo will now design for catastrophe ???
    I will keep you posted of seed as it becomes available.
     
  3. d_donahoo

    d_donahoo Junior Member

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    he all intrestingly enough (or ironically)...on the way into bendigo from melbourne there is a house on the left hand side that is made from three dome shaped structures.

    a work collegue is friends with the owners and evidently the design is a prototype that is meant to survive very strong winds (cyclone).

    the tornado was no where near this house - but my cynical response of why you'd build a cyclone proof house in bendigo has been answered.

    in some weird way it was a pity it missed the chance to be tested...
     
  4. permaculture.biz

    permaculture.biz Junior Member

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    Jeff,

    Unfortunately learning from catastrophe is something that will likely not happen. The rules of civil engineering and probability apply - most people maintain either apathy or are lead by responsible authorities whose approval processes acknowledge 1:50-100 year risks - in some case even less. EG. A couple of years ago David Holmgren and I were working on a development in Bendigo. We had the local Environmental Engineering Students conduct a run off/catchment analysis of the urban area upstream of the site. This was all fine - however what ultimately happened was that they (and the approval body - council) didn't calculate the effect on runoff of undersized storm water drains. Nature is a great teacher as we all know - well soon after we got 120mm over night - which for Bendigo is a lot of rain (in the top 5% of recorded events) and shitloads of houses were flooded causing all kinds of pandemonium. Did we do anything - yes David had designed the job to handle such events - simple landscape reading revealed what complicated engineering sometimes doesn't. Did the authorities do anything - no the undersize SW drains are still there waiting for the next deluge - which have become more common phenomena - certainly not 1:50 more like 1:10-20 : which says one thing : poor design and cost cutting - the mighty dollar heh!!

    In the meantime there has been no local debate of future planning to overcome such catastophe's. Even after the event of wild fire people and authorities still don't get it - you see it everywhere - and I thought pain was the best teacher!

    Common sense is an uncommon commodity....

    DD
     

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