Cypress mulch - how bad is it?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by sbrokvam, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. sbrokvam

    sbrokvam Junior Member

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    Hi, I've got my hands on a large pile of fine grade cypress mulch, and am pondering what the best use of it will be for my garden. I normally use sugar cane or lucerne for the veggie beds and under trees, and also (increasingly) prunings from the various stuff that's starting to come along in the garden, and I was not planning on putting the cypress mulch on the actual veggie beds. Rather, I was thinking of using it to cover pathways as the woodchips I had put down before were so coarse and hard on bare feet. However, the pathways are all right among the beds, so I figure any adverse effects they may have on soil conditions could still be a bit of an issue.

    Specifically, I am wondering:
    - Is cypress mulch a bit off-centre PH-wise? I know termites aren't supposed to like it - does that mean beneficial insects won't like it either?
    - How unsustainable is cypress mulch production? I live in SE Qld - is it produced anywhere near here? Are they cutting down virgin forest?

    Thanks,
    Ståle
     
  2. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

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    My experience has been that it is an excellent path mulch and supresses weeds well.

    I find it can also be used under shrubs and trees but i'd avoid using around annuals.

    I used some fresh leaf shredings from a macrocarpa around a hydrangea macro and it has the deepest blue flowers i have ever seen. In contrast, my grandmother has a hydrangea growing in a small ring around a concrete path and the flowers are a brilliant pink. Shows the changes in Ph with both types of mulch.
     
  3. derekh

    derekh Junior Member

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    Most of the Cypress pine production comes from out west near Roma or inland northern NSW. Cypress is not generally a plantation timber but relies upon natural regeneration that is managed as part of State Forests. It is a slow growing timber but does regenerate naturally. My place was cleared some 40 years ago and has become overgrown with the stuff, I actually need to harshly thin to optimise the regrowth. So, yes it is a sustainable source.

    cheers
    Derek

    p.s. Callitris glaucophylla
     
  4. sbrokvam

    sbrokvam Junior Member

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    Thanks Eric and Derek, I'm glad to hear it's not like the Kleenex thing with Kleenex turning Canadian boreal forests into paper for human snot (a practice they now seem to have stopped?). Also relieved to to learn I've done the right thing keeping the mulch off my annuals. And yes, I see clear signs that plants from different seeds turn a different colour with different soil types.

    Ståle
     

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