corn

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by beanpole, May 22, 2007.

  1. beanpole

    beanpole Junior Member

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    I harvested the last of my corn cobs and none of them have set any corn they are just empty cobs . What has happened?
     
  2. richard in manoa

    richard in manoa Junior Member

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    zero pollination. :cry:
     
  3. richard in manoa

    richard in manoa Junior Member

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    or, maybe something else got to them first? :shock:

    what does it look like? was there ever any kernels there? any evidence of insects larvae having eaten the corn?
     
  4. Plumtree

    Plumtree Junior Member

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    We need more info Bean but sounds like a lack of water. Corn grows best when it is all bunched together and, initially, protected from the wind. It always seems easier to grow 26 corn plants than 6!
     
  5. beanpole

    beanpole Junior Member

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    corn

    It may be lack of water as in rural Nsw there has been no rain for months and they are on the bore water and I did have only about 5 plants that survived that second planting. My first lot were fine.
     
  6. Plumtree

    Plumtree Junior Member

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    My conditions are exactly the same. My bore water is pretty good but a bit hard. The biggest problem is ensuring that the water gets to the roots where it can be taken up. The drought conditions seem to have made this a major problem.

    Add heaps of humus and compost just to mechanically break the soil up. I added heaps of sheep manure because it is pelletised(natually) and contibutes to the friability of the soil. It is wise to use a 'soil wetter' product to help with water penetration.

    Sow the seeds and thin to about 30cm seperation after germination but avoid creating neat rows. This bunching aids in pollenation.

    As the plants grow, heap soil around the base of each plant as you do potatoes to encourage additional root growth. Add mulch to hold the water. Most importantly, corn grows into huge plants so it needs a lot of water and fertiliser. Make sure you water heavily 2-3 times per week and make sure it gets to the roots. :wink:
     
  7. ejanea

    ejanea Junior Member

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    I think it's mainly the number of plants. Mine do ok when they're planted in a block (eg 6 rows of 8) rather than a row that is 48 long... and pretty close together too, especially if you need to water because the shade protects the soil along with the mulch. The male parts hang out of the top of the stalk and the pollen has to fall down onto the female bits where the cobs form. If the pollen drops out when it's a bit bumpy (and maybe windy) then they need to be going in the right direction to land in the right spot. The "middle" stalks seem to be the best fertilised. If you have a small patch and take notice of how many fat yellow bits are inside the corn cobs as you pick them, you find the ones around the outside are the sparse ones.
     
  8. Plumtree

    Plumtree Junior Member

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    Perhaps the most important thing with corn, often understated, is that each tassle must be polinated in order to produce just one single kernel of corn. This shows just how important it is to have the plants bunched close together and to protect them from wind at this early stage. [/u]
     
  9. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Corn is wind-pollinated. That's why you have to plant them in blocks rather than single rows.

    From https://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/WCM/2006/W186.htm :

    "Corn yield is most sensitive to water stress during flowering and pollination, followed by grain-filling, and finally vegetative growth stages."

    And "Corn responds to water stress by leaf rolling. Highly stressed plants will begin leaf rolling early in the day."

    Sue
     

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