Controlling slugs in the vegetable gargen

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Veggie Boy, Jun 22, 2004.

  1. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

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    I've tried beer traps - but they seem to like the growing lettuce more. I am obviously totally against toxic snail baits. Does anyone have any other solutions. In a recent article I saw reference to iron based non-toxic snail baits. What are these -are they just non-toxic to pets and himans but toxic to lizards etc?? Any ideas appreciated.
     
  2. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

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    Sluggo

    I did a bit of research myself on the Web - wasn't hard to find - guess I should have done that first. The product is called Sluggo. Its active ingredient is iron phosphate. Info is available at the following site, including a full fact sheet https://www.clyderobin.com/mixes/spec_sluggo.html

    I imagine that it is not permie friendly - but would be interested in opinions/knowledge of readers.
     
  3. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day vegieboy,

    we use a variety of methods, the beer traps have worked very well for us, also with the flat slugs and the snails with shells we used to pick some of them off at night using the torch and the squish them under foot on the cement path. we use a spray of very very strong instant coffee mix use the el-cheepo brand and realy get it flowing down the plant. also we pick off any we find early in the morning. up here we only have those little cigar shaped ones to deal ith but if you don't get on top of them they do a lot of damage, the pick off in the morning and spray the night before with coffee has worked with them.

    there is a native snail that will eat those ferels. vigilence works get on top of them early in the season, make places for them to hide under ie.,. sheets of cardboard with stones/bricks holding the corners down or pieces of wall board anywhere that is dark then you can collect them from there at leasure the next day. also laying a spread of fine sawdust around the plants will work this needs regular replacement.

    len 8)
     
  4. makehumusnotwar

    makehumusnotwar Junior Member

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    don't just throw the squished slugs and snails away. chuck them into a bucket of water and make some slug tea to spray on the plants and beds. apparently this is not only good for the plants, it seems to deter future generations from tasting your food before you do. i haven't tried this myself yet, just remember reading it somewhere. i don't have a huge problem with slugs/snails yet, as there's not a whole lot on the menu they're interested in, as my beds are fairly new.

    a different angle to consider is this : you may lose a bit of food here and there, but nature always restores the balance - eventually. if the pest numbers become rather large, predators will figure it out pretty quickly and have a field day in your garden.

    i try to remind myself that essentially, the food is there to share, and without the snails and other pests, i wouldn't have a lot of the other beautiful wildlife in my garden.
     
  5. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

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    Slug spray

    I'm not sure that making a spray out of the slugs would be a good idea. I have heard that slugs carry disease - including hepatitis - which is a major reason why I am not happy to just let them have their bit of the lettuce.
     
  6. junglerikki

    junglerikki Junior Member

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    I've not heard that one before! Wow! On the same note though, if you make & spray a snail/slug juice around your plants (maybe not on them, it would b a little gross) there's a chance that one of them carried a snail/slug disease that may grow in the juice & to spray around may kill other slimers. Jackie French has mentioned this to do with scale & other bugs. :)
     
  7. makehumusnotwar

    makehumusnotwar Junior Member

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    snail spray

    thanks junglerikki! i knew i'd read it somewhere - of course, jackie french. here's a summary from her book : catch the snails/slugs, throw them in a bucket of water, put the lid on for a few weeks, and then feed the resulting liquid and sludge to your plants. apparently it is high in calcium, nitrogen and phosphorus - and possibly a disease carrier or deterrent for other snails/slugs. she also suggests spraying with wormwood or mulching with oak leaves, which the snails will avoid. then of course, there's the much overused mollison quote that everyone's heard "you don't have a snail problem, you've got a duck deficiency."
     
  8. junglerikki

    junglerikki Junior Member

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    I woulkd like to try using copper barriers around the veggie patch, either as an entire border around the whole or little wire rings around individual seedlings. Apparently it's like an electric shock to them if they touch it! Haven't tried it yet, will let u know once have, has anyone tried it?
     
  9. Guest

    Haven't tried it but have read that its used by snail farmers to keep snails in. Have read in the same grass roots article that the angle of the copper is important to its effectiveness.

    Veggie Boy
     
  10. junglerikki

    junglerikki Junior Member

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    Ooh, I have to try, until then, I am using Iron Phosphate baits (by Multiguard)as I find it so hard to give up my precious beer! (Which now my partner brews)This is a temp solution while I am so busy, apparently those with the time can use cabbage leaves in soapy water.
     
  11. Douglas J.E. Barnes

    Douglas J.E. Barnes Junior Member

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    Savage little blighters they are! They've killed off a few plants in my garden thus far. I'm using diatomaceous earth (which if I look closely at the slugs, I can see them laughing at it), and galvanized mtal rings around plant stems. I haven't hit on the right control, but going out at night and picking them off and droping them in a tub of salt works well. I've tried the beer traps - I want that beer for myself! They attract them quite well. I just hope to find out what species of beetles are their predators and get as many of them as I can.

    Has anyone tried Nemaslug (Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita)? Think it would muck up my soil biota?
     
  12. Mungbeans

    Mungbeans Junior Member

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    Apparently its the yeast in the beer that attracts the snails. I purchased the yeast meaning to set up snail traps and then lost the recipe for the yeast based bait. I think it was just sugar, water and yeast.
     
  13. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Ducks eat slugs and provide rich by-product! :D

    9anda1f
    Western Washington State
    Slug Capital of the World!
     
  14. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Slug Fritters

    Ingredients
    10 freshly slaughtered slugs cleaned of all outer mucous
    1/2 cup of cornmeal
    1/2 cup of high protein flour
    3 eggs
    2 egg yolks
    1/4 cup of heavy cream
    4 tbs. Of butter
    4tsp.of sour cream

    Instructions

    First chop the slugs into fine mince, then beat the eggs and egg yolks with the heavy cream together. Sift the dry ingredients and then cut 2 tbs of butter into that mixture. Add the egg and cream mixture to the dry ingredients and whip with a whisk vigorously for one to two minutes. Melt one tbs of butter in a sauté pan and pure the batter into 2 1/2 inch cakes in two batches. Serve warm with a dollop of sour cream.
    Yields 4 servings.

    From: [email protected]

    Collected by Bert Christensen
    Toronto, Ontario

    https://bertc.com

    :oops: :D 9anda1f
     
  15. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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  16. Jez

    Jez Junior Member

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    I'm pretty open minded about food 9anda1f...but that's really pushing things mate...:lol:

    A dash of homebrewed beer in a deep saucer has always worked wonders for me with slugs and seems to get plenty of snails as well, but for alternate methods (which I've never tried because beer works so well for my purpose), apparently rings of sawdust or egg shells can work well around the affected areas.

    Can't see why just yeast in sugar and water, or honey and water wouldn't work Mung, but it may well be worth letting it ferment in a warm place for a few days first...then hold your nose when you pour it into the trap... :D
     
  17. Douglas J.E. Barnes

    Douglas J.E. Barnes Junior Member

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    Better make sure your slugs are well cooked. They can carry all sorts of nasties including e.coli.

    We can't keep ducks, and I wouldn't like getting up that early to walk through with the duck(s) - slugs are nocturnal and ducks are diurnal.

    I'll give Nemaslug a try and report on it.
     
  18. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    :D No worries, everyone! I wouldn't eat slugs either, just an interesting "idea" (if you can call it that!). :shock:

    I lived on the shore of a lake for a number of years. Each early morning the local ducks would "police-up" the yard for slugs and other edibles. They did almost no harm to the garden while greatly assisting with slug control, so I encouraged their visits. Because they were wild and there was significant water available, it was free help. Domestic ducks would require some thought as to environment and "pasturing", as Douglas mentions.

    I learned something new from the slug control link, that being the bit about keeping the plant's foliage dry while watering the base being a deterrent. One thing I learned from my parents while growing up was to keep slug "hiding places" to a minimum. This meant not having rock/stone piles, wood piles, or anything that would provide shady/damp environment within "striking" range of the garden (say30-40 feet, if possible). This "no-slug's land" buffer coupled with judicious "picking" of the critters in the evening and early morning kept damage to a tolerable minimum. I also noted the linked site's warning about mulching later in the season to minimize this type of environment, especially for the slug eggs.

    9anda1f
     
  19. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    You know, I've found that the beer traps also catch the good guys that I need to help me, like beetles (who are indispensable when it comes to breaking down twigs and wood that gets into the soil).

    But the one thing that snails don't like is coffee. Just straight coffee sprayed only onto the soil, and they won't cross over it. If you don't drink it, buy the cheapest instant coffee you can find. Coffee also works well for adding some acidity to the soil.
     
  20. Douglas J.E. Barnes

    Douglas J.E. Barnes Junior Member

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    I'm going through a number of different techniques now. Two nights ago, I was pulling them off, putting them on the cement and squishing them. Last night the numbers were way down as I jabbed them with a needle on a pole.

    The coffee is worth a try.
     

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