Composting human crap

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by helenlee, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    I found some earthworms underneath a bird carcass on the tarmac recently. No plants there.

    I also was confused by the links to earthworms, as for composting we're talking about compost worms.

    Sweetpea, I've read alot of this thread. You still seem to be saying that you can't usefully use compost worms in a humanure system. I just pointed out that there are plenty of examples where that is exactly what people are doing.

    Did you see my point about humans not being carnivores?

    I do think there are differences between carnivore, herbivore and omnivore poo. But I don't see how that stops worms working with it.
     
  2. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I recall correctly there are around 2,000 species of worms around the world that are collectively known as Earthworms. Compost worms are chosen from this group due to their prolific breeding habits and their ability to consume their own body weight in waste each 24 hours. So while composting worms (Lumbricus, Eisenia, Perionyx etc) are simply different species to agricultural worms (Aporrectodea)...

    Composting worms are also known to be surface dwelling worms usually living in the top 6 inches of the soil.
     
  3. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    Most gardeners would differentiate between an earthworm (lives in the soil) and a compost worm (lives in compost or worm farm).

    My worm farm is a metre deep and the worms live all through it :) Makes sense they would live near the surface in the wild though, because that's where the compost is.
     
  4. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2003
    Messages:
    1,585
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Gee and some people say ill argue over shit too....

    Sounds like you all might be a bit right,it does happen...

    Id like to try adding poo to my aquaponic system... dunno how or what yet tho...

    maybe i can use a mix of maggots and worms to feed my fish... any ideas?

    Tezza
     
  5. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,464
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    we used worms to compost our humanure for all the time we had the n/l toilet. they managed to do the job over about a 7 month period, when we got app' 1.5 large wheelbarrows full of humus to put into the garden. at the end of the day a worm is a worm as a worm is a worm realy. the worms we used to have in the worm farm of over a decade ago still exist in our gardens, where all the vemicomposting occurs. common exotic garden worms (they are exotic as far as i know for the main our native worms don't exist in our gardens anymore) do a lot of moving around if you put them into acompost bin like the loo the next day you can see where they have exited the bin and gone bush. the beauty of the composting variety of worms is they appear to be more social and hang around together where the food is. they can usually be found just under the mulch layer or working that just added in kitchen scraps area.

    len
     
  6. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    1,442
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So, Len, your composting toilet also has plant matter in it, right? You put layers of straw or leaves or whatever you use over each deposit, right? There are not just worms and crap and urine. It's not the worms that are breaking it down to begin with. It's the microbial life in the plant matter.

    I give up, you guys. No one here seems to want to really learn what is going on technically in a composting toilet. You see worms, so you assume they are doing all the work. You keep beating a dead horse here, saying it's worms, worms, worms, but it's not. They come in AFTER the breaking down has happened by microbial life. AFTER. And that's my last post here. I can't believe that no one is willing to go study this farther from reliable sources. and just because a publisher publishes a book doesn't mean it's reliable :(
     
  7. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Tezza, why not use black soldier fly larvae as a way to dispose of poo and create fish food?
     
  8. milifestyle

    milifestyle New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't disagree with you Sweetpea, everything breaks down and microbes and bacteria help break all organic matter down making it easier for worms to consume... but my view is that these microbes help make the food digestible. Microbes and bacteria are in everything that was once living, whether worms are in the picture or not. If worms are added to this mixture of Organic matter (inc. human feces) the worms are doing a stage one breakdown (making the microbes, bacteria and organic matter into an almost plant available form)...
     
  9. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,464
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    now we did not cover each stool, only about once or twice a week a couple handsfull, and at empty time like when the drum was filling the worms were trhoughout the drums not just where the bit of mushroom compost might be. me i got no idea asawrom wriggles along passing what is in front of it through its body how they can tell the difference between vege' matter and other do they spit it out and head in another direction maybe? and when we put meat scraps in the garden the worms are there consuming it or that is how it looks. so not regular layers of mushy compost is all we used and used nothing when we had no mushy. no real nead to cover stools as the toilet had no odour.

    might have said earlier in the bush we had this longish plack fly pure black by recollection, before n/l redisgned their lid they could slip in under the lid and into the drum, i thought their maggots did a great job breaking the mix down, was the best bin we produced i felt.

    len
     

Share This Page

-->