Commercial kitchen stoves

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by NJNative, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. NJNative

    NJNative Junior Member

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    Hey everyone,

    Does anyone know of any commercial models of kitchen stove that runs on renewable energy. The most viable ones that I've considered are biogas (although I've heard that it is difficult to scale, unless you have a very consistent source of fuel), wood burning, and wood gas. I posted this same question recently in a different venue, and someone sent this beauty in response:

    https://www.woodstoves.net/cookstoves/kitchenqueen.htm

    I really like this model because you can also heat hot water for sink, shower, or heating use. However, what I noticed is that unlike a gas stove, you cannot increase or decrease the heat, you're pretty much stuck on one heat setting. That's not ideal for commercial cooking. With the kitchen queen model in mind, I set out to create a wood gas stove that has a similar concept, but since it is using gas, is able to have high heat to low heat on the stove top. The oven and griddle will be whatever temperature is being conducted from the combustion chamber, but I feel that this is more acceptable, and it may even be possible to have some sort of temperature control. Something not pictured could be conducting excess heat to a water chamber for sink, shower, or heating use.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8496787847/

    What are you thoughts, would this system work? Is there any sort of tweaking that might need to be done to make it work more efficiently or effectively? Would anyone happen to know anyone who could design and/or build such a system? Finally, does anyone have any other ideas for renewable energy commercial cooking stove?

    Thanks!
     
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Wow, that Kitchen Queen IS a beauty! I note that it also "heats 2000 square feet" ... while nice in the winter, would this be desirable for summer cooking?? Your kitchen crew might rebel!

    Your sketch of a wood gasifier stove looks do-able (not sure by whom) but complicated.

    For commercial use, would a traditional commercial natural gas stove/oven fed by a bio-digester make more sense?
    Whoa, maybe not: https://www.biofermenergy.com/press-release-titan-55-on-allen-farms/
    That thing is huge for a "small scale bio-digester"
    [​IMG]
    Sourcing the "bio" materials would also be difficult if they're not available right on-site.
     
  3. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    surely you vary the heat by the amount of wood you use. Not a quick adjustment but doable. In a woodfired pizza oven you use the declining heat to cook biscuits and deserts so vary the use with the position the stove is at.
    Very nice stove.
     
  4. NJNative

    NJNative Junior Member

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    9and1f, like all hot water heating (which is how it's able to heat that much space, by heating water, which is circulated around baseboards), you can turn off the circulation pump so that it's just heating hot water. Another option may even be turbine for electricity generation! I wonder if that's possible, with all the excess heat being created during summer...

    But anyway, my main focus is on the system I proposed, or some other alternative that would work well for a small scale. Yea, biogas is definitely really tricky, given it's sheer size.
     

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