Coddling moth

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by pippimac, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Friends have a big old overgrown apple tree which I've offered to prune and look after in exchange for fruit.
    It has bad black spot, which I'm pretty confident I can get rid of by removing old fruit and adding loads of compost/mulch.
    Now coddling moth has shown up. I've never dealt with these before, but it looks fairly challenging.
    Does anyone have treatments they recommend? Traps, sprays, cultural hints...
    And running poultry to help isn't an option, unfortunately.
     
  2. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    An organic guide and life cylcle of the coddling moth
    https://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/Attachments/CART-82L4KR/$FILE/OCT%20apples%20A3%20FARMPOINT.pdf

    If you have insectivoris bats in your area, creating habitat for them near your tree can help your problem.

    https://www.greenharvest.com.au/pestcontrol/codling_moth_info.html
     
  3. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    If it were me I would first set about making the tree as healthy as possible. The stronger it is the more resistant and resilient it will be. Give it a really good 'haircut' to get it to a good shape. Remove all of the affected fruit. If it was really bad I would even consider taking all of the fruit off for a year and getting rid of it. It's worth taking the lifecycle (above) into consideration when you do this.

    Plant a few things around and under it to discourage the moths and other pests. Try wallflowers, apple mint, chives, nasturtiums, foxgloves, marjoram and ajuga.

    Take a long term approach, so that rather than rushing to have apples this year, you can build a tree that will give you great apples for many years.
     
  4. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    We tied an old Hessian sack around the trunk of dads tree and collected the grub.
    Painted the trunk in lime to make the bark less attractive.
    It reduced it but you need to keep it up for a few years we lost motivation as the lorikeets ate all the fruit anyhow.
    I would imagine if my dad could be bothered netting the tree or a section of it, it would be moth free just by the birds having disrupted their cycle.
    I reckon Chooks would pick off the grubs when they hibernate over winter. (we had none to try)
     
  5. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

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  6. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Thanks everyone. It looks like I've missed my window for this year: I'll go round and see if there's any grubs still in the fruit, but I think they've headed off already.
    I'm assuming that's codling generation 'round two' already, since the apples are ripe now/soon.
    If they're still in there or not, the apples are coming off and turning into cider/vinegar.
     
  7. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

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    Idea for a new business: 'Rent-a-Hen' coddling moth control.

    People rent out their sheep and sheepdog to control weed growth, so why couldn't you have the same type of operation with chickens?

    Get a heavy-bodied breed like an Orpington that doesn't fly very high. Train to run into a couple of dog crates. Get a roll of relatively short wire mesh fencing to contain the birds.

    Place fencing around base of tree, add hens. When area is cleaned up, move fencing. Repeat. You could even do this with your old hens who aren't laying much anymore, make them earn their keep.

    Sue
     
  8. JoH

    JoH Junior Member

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    Ha ha, there are a few places who do this - www.rentachook.com.au is one and there are a few others but I would need to look them up.
     

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