Citrus pests - How do I control citrus pests?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by vetti, Aug 11, 2003.

  1. vetti

    vetti New Member

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    We're babes in the bush when it comes to permaculture and gardening, but I am interested in treating our citrus trees (on our suburban block in Sydney) in a sustainable way. I looked up the Department of Ag web site and it seems to be spray, spray, spray!! We have problems with a lot of pests (beetles, caterpillars, mould, white scale etc) at the moment and I'd like to learn how we can better approach the problem. I have a 1991 copy of "Introduction to Permaculture" and it looks v.interesting. Currently we have pinebark mulch under the trees. We also have two small children. Any advice would be appreciated as to where I can look for more information. Thank you
     
  2. Chook Nut

    Chook Nut Junior Member

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    Hi Vetti,

    Sounds as though you don't have enough predatory insects in your garden.

    A couple of suggestions for you, plant insectory plants. I use salvias all around the base of my citrus as they are good for bees and wasps which scare off or parasitise some pests. You can use flowering herbs as well, i want to try using dill when we move soon.

    With mould, i would use a seaweed/fish emulsion and water all over the leaves, repeat weekly till problem is solved and then perhaps monthly as a preventitive measure. With ants and scale, try using soapy water diluted with crushed chillies or garlic mixed. They wont like it too much :p

    Not all beetles are bad...again just lots of flowering plants around the trees, the smaller the flowers the better for some of our native wasps that can be as small as 3mm. The bigger ones are just as effective and was amazed at how few caterpillars i got this year compared to last year when we first moved in. Daisies like Brachycome/and Seaside Daisy that have the smaller flowers look great too and are what your predatory insects need and native bees.

    I plant Lavender, Cosmos and a heap of Salvias to invite these good insects to my garden. They are easy to propogate and save seed as well. (some salvias and definitely cosmos self seed!)

    Cheers......... Dave
     
  3. vix

    vix Junior Member

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    Jackie French has lots of useful organic info, too, for some of the disease problems. There's plenty of her books about.
     

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