Children's play lawn.

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Mat, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. Mat

    Mat Junior Member

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    Hi all, I am setting up my little plot in the mid north of nsw Australia. I have allowed a section of my yard set aside for the kids play area. I am unsure what to have as a lawn type situation. I am think most grasses will be a bit hard to control so I'm thinking some low legume. Any ideas would be great.
    Cheers.
    Mat. T
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Chamomile?
     
  3. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    I reckon if you must have a lawn, just have a lawn. Something with clover is nice (just gotta watch for bees).

    The thing is, from my experience, if you give kids a range of other things to do they'll choose that over lawn almost every time. A reasonable sized mound of dirt is always good. Some kind of bark mulch has endless possibilities. Put those things together with bamboo poles or sticks and the world is their creative oyster.

    I was telling one bloke about how children really play, not how we think they play and that all the plastic toys and pre-fab swing-sets only hold their interest for a short time. After that he was watching his kids in their back yard. He had a big mound of gravel in the drive, sitting there ready to spread and he had been shooing the kids off it all the time. Then the realisation hit him that they were really enjoying the gravel and really it didn't matter if they were playing in it. They were in fact playing really well together (which is not always the case ;) ). He was even wondering whether he might have to leave the pile rather than spread it...

    Observation.

    That is a classic case of the problem being the solution

    There is a lesson in that for us all.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I can relate to that. My kids preferred the tupperware drawer or the peg basket or a saucepan and a wooden spoon over the toy box. I remember playing with great delight on a large mound of chook poo delivered to my parents house when I was really little. Might explain why I still get excited by the thought of a big pile of manure in a garden!
     
  5. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    I think that is all true 'cept it's hard to play cricket in the backyard on a mound of dirt or gravel ;-)

    Mat, what do you mean grass would be hard to control. I agree with Grahame, if you want lawn, get grass (plus clover, yarrow etc). There is a reason why people use grass - it's low care and easy to manage, plus hardy (I doubt that lawn chamomile would stand up to kids playing on it). You do need a way of cutting grass though.

    I reckon it's worth having a lawn just for the grass clippings to use in the compost, superb stuff.
     
  6. aneurine

    aneurine Junior Member

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    Oh you have all given me some ideas. Loving the mound of dirt concept.
     
  7. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    But cricket is so boring.... Playing hide and seek in the jungle, or spot the fairy, or monkey man in the trees is much more fun.
     
  8. Mat

    Mat Junior Member

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    Thanks all. I do agree that kids find there own fun and games in all sorts of mounds and pile throughout the garden, but I do want a little area to roll around and play fight with the kids.
    I thought grass would be a bit aggressive but it will be surounded by paths so I think I will just do it and mix it with clovers and also pennyroyal?
    Cheers. Mat.
     
  9. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    I was a little bit horrified when i came to the conclusion that my permaculture solution to a number of "problems" was turf! But after putting aside my predjidis I have come to fully appreciate this wonderful perennial. It has created a beautiful living/ play space for our family, reduced dust in the house, had a significant cooling effect and has provided green material for the compost and our muscovy ducks take care of some of the mowing for us :)
     
  10. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Do you call yourself an Australian?!
     
  11. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    There is a place for everything in permaculture. Turf got a bad name at some time and hasn't really recovered yet.
     
  12. Mudman

    Mudman Junior Member

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    Maybe put in a no mow variety like zoysia or something similar if maintenance is a concern.
    My boys would be lost if they didn't have the lawn to play football and cricket on.
     

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