Chemicals . . .

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by living simple, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    Hi all,

    Can anyone tell me if there is a book/catalogue or website available with a list of chemicals, sprays and the procedures which our commercial fruit and veggies go through, before we put it into our mouths?? I mean for each individual fruit or veggie i.e,

    APPLES - sprayed 24 times with XXX & XXX
    BANANAS - sprayed 18 times with XXX & XXX, etc!
    CARROTS - you get the picure!

    Do i make sense?? Maybe this sort of information is hard to get a hold of?

    Although i know the 'supermarket' fruit and veggies are not good for us, i would like to be more knowledgable on this topic!

    Cheers
    Lyn
     
  2. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day lyn,

    know what you mean but bet there isn't one readily available you would need to go to a plcae where farmers buy their chemicals, you may i'd the chem' but maybe not how many applications or how long before they supposed to pick them. for me the systemic chemical residues in all so called fress food including meats is not know to us and any health problems is not known to farmers, doctors or whom ever, as they have never had any human trialing of individual applications let alone what a cocktail may present and that includes prescription things as well eg.,. food additives and preservatives.

    last i heard onions got about 20 applications of sprays potatoes 30 or was it the other way around and if grown right they don't need any. apples and pears got around 600 during their growing cycle. and citrus get sprayed with systemic fungicides as well. then seedless grapes and watermelons cop more applications to make them seedless the list is endless.

    not to mention all that fresh food is stored in fridges for up to 12 months and they use a chemicla gas the permiates into the fruit etc.,. to stop ripening/aging, then they use another chemical application to bring on ripening. oh and potatoes, onion family, carrot and beet families all get treated so they don't sprout on the shelf.

    and food grown under contract has to be treated as the contractor requires regardless of necessity.

    anyhow keep us informed as to what you find out.

    len :?
     
  3. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    Hey, thanks for your reply Len!

    I thought it might be really difficult to get this sort of info! Maybe i should start a book myself!! Maybe go around the farmers (in disguise!) and ask about the process - actually i think they would get offended pretty soon.

    It's scary when you read the process that some of this 'fresh food' goes through so we can eat it, and grow up big and strong, eh?! I knew that apples were sprayed 24 times, then waxed/polished for our convenience, and that onions and the brasacas are chemically treated ridiculous amounts!! Thanks for the other comments on gassing, and treatment for sprouting (didn't think of that one!).

    I have a brother-in-law who is a potato farmer and he tells me a bit about the procedure and what he MUST do to the spuds before the companies will buy them - it's shocking!

    Anyhow, thanks again - i'll keep looking into it . . .

    Cheers
    Lyn
     
  4. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day Lyn

    At present I am about 3/4's of the way through a Chemical Handler's Course, a MANDATORY componant for the following nationally accredited courses (and part of the Australian National Training Framework):

    Conservation and Land Management Training Package (RTD 02)
    Rural Production Training Package (RTE 03)
    Amenity Horticulture (RTF 03)

    If I successfully complete this course, I will achieve 'ChemCert' accreditation. This will give me access to the (Victorian) 'Agricultural Chemical Users Permit' (ACUP), and thus enable me to access certain chemicals that are restricted by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA). It is my honest wish that I NEVER have to use the above qualifications.

    The facilitator of this course openly states that he "...hates chemicals". He comes from an amazingly long and chequered 'industry focussed' background, and from an era when DDT was sprayed "...once in the morning, once at noon, and once at night". Some of the stories he has relayed to us is enough to make my skin crawl. The only reason why he is alive today and able to tell his amazing story is that he had the good sense approximately 50-years ago to understand that "all chemicals, no matter whether they be naturally occuring [at unnatural quantities or strengths] or synthetically made, are DANGEROUS!" His advice is: "Have nothing to do with any of them!"

    Further, he talks of many 'mainstream' farmers who have done this course and have since converted to organic status. I wonder why? At last year's (Bendigo, Vic) PDC we had a few ex-mainstream farmers attending (one in particular has been involved in the organic movement for some time). I wonder why they were interested in learning about permaculture?

    Here in Australia there are many acts regulating the manufacture, importation, storage, sale, and use of chemicals. Check these out. They alone are 'interesting' (read *frightening*) reading.

    Federal: Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Code Act 1994

    State (Vic): Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) Act 1992

    the APVMA's website:

    https://www.apvma.gov.au

    Other state acts relevant to chemicals are:

    Catchment and Land Act 1994

    Road Transport (Dangerous Goods) Act 1995

    The Occupational Health and Safety Act 1985 and the Dangerous Goods Act 1985

    Environmental Protection Act 1970

    Health Act 1958 (roughly coinciding with the demise of DDT 'friendly community spray patrols')

    I wonder why it is, that something million's of people consume each day, plastered on practically everything the eat, needs such a high level of governance?

    The questions Ive asked during the above are one's that I've asked myself, and I'm satisfied with the answers I've given myself. I can't tell all the people in the world not to consume poisen (check out the labeling on any S7 chemical - the same stuff that gets sprayed on your supermarket tomatoes approximately 30-times before you put them in your trolly - they even put a scull'n'crossed bones symbol on them!). That's a decision each will have to make for themselves.

    The information is freely available. Take the time to aquire it, and study it for yourself.

    Cheerio,

    Mark.
     
  5. spritegal

    spritegal Junior Member

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    pretty comprehensive advice, Mark!

    I can't add a whole lot more except that reading some of the older fruit and veg books are real eye openers as to which chemicals are generally sprayed on what.

    Try "Fruit Growing in Australia" by Paul Baxter
    Also a similar book by Louis Glowinski (just google)

    Both are industry standards and were written at a time when spraying fruit trees was "de rigeur"

    regards

    sprite
     
  6. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day lyn,

    you say apples are sprayed 24 times the documentry i saw suggested up to 600 times before picking and what they then do to store them for up to 12 months.

    anyhow i have a document on my computer (in storage) that i have been compiling from information i find or hear, if i can still find this post when i get the comp' back and up and running i will send it to you.

    when looking for land we got told lots of stuff (un-solicited) one pea farmer contracted to a major processor required to spray for pea-weed within 14 days of harvest when the instructions on the tin of spray said a withholding period of 90 days.

    also another young couple contracted to supply zucchini & jap pumpkin to a major retailer, they would not eat any of that produce they grew their own organically but they had no qualms about making money from consumers who have no idea what goes on.

    if you word your search strings right you will find a lot of info on individual crops. i wanted to find how they stopped the onion/garlic family from sprouting in the stores, i found the answer.

    len
     
  7. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    chemicals

    EcohadMark, I think you are right in noticing a trend with trad farmers looking outside the chemical treadmill. They are finding their “essential” chemicals are more and more expensive. If they have to apply something 600 times – that's a real cost. The national supermarket chains are pressuring farmers to reduce costs, and farmers have now been squeezed everywhere else, they are being forced to look at their chemical use as this is the last line of costs that have not been reduced – and are rising. It's like offering them a magic potion – “imagine not having to spray ever again”. A few years back it was easy for the mainstream (chemical lobby) to dismiss the permie/organic solution, but fortunately there are now enough “runs on the board”, that mainstreamers can see that it does work, when done properly.
    Harsh to say, but the “silver lining” in this last drought was it forced farmers from every corner of Oz to really think outside the box for solutions if they wanted to stay on the land. People who had adopted “crazy alternative” practices had a bit of a softer ride through the hard times of this last drought. It got mainstreamers to challenge their own hard-line views.
     
  8. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    chemicals

    I was told by an organic vegetable grower that Coles who buy their organic carrots are still trying to get them to dip all the carrots in chlorine, as do all other carrot growers. I always wondered why a carrot picked for over about 1/2 hour goes limp and the shop ones sit up stright for ever. Hey that just reminded me I picked about 6 beautiful baby carrots a couple of hours ago and I've left them on the garden path, I'll bet they are nice and limp by now!!
    Another point of interest is why you won't ever buy a true new potato. They will brown within few hours and go soft. No-one, even organic shops will sell them as they simply don't have any storage life at all. I tried to sell them to a f&v shop just down the road and he informed me that all the chats are immature potato plants that have been sprayed to kill the tops, left for about a week so the skins harden then picked. Everyone should know that the best potatoes ever are the real babies.
    What about a real peach!! I could hardly get the best peaches from the tree to the kitchen without bruising them. I have no idea how anyone could ever expect a peach to taste good unless it just fell off the perch so-to-speak
     
  9. scooter1962

    scooter1962 Junior Member

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    chemicals

    most spray regimes have a 7, 14 or 21 day cycle during the growing season. I used to be a spud grower in a former life, and we really blizt 'em big time....(ohhhh the shame)

    In defense of the average farmer, they would rather not spray if possible, it costs a lot of money. Also, the chemical companies are attempting to become greener, whether that is for show or for real is any one's guess, but there is a strong shift towards not using chemical agents where possible.
     
  10. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    I didn't read all of the posts before.
    Farmers normally (at least in Europe) get ofiicial advises how often to spray how much and what. Search at the sites of the manufactor af the chemicals, here you can perhaps find the information.
    In Germany it is said that the rate of allergies is much higher in rural areas than in urban areas - especially of fruit growing areas !!! Pollen converts itself in a more agressive form with cemical sprays.
     

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