Can I plant a tamarillo near to a shed

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by beginnergardener, Jun 3, 2017.

  1. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Because tamarillos are a fairly soft type of plant does it mean you can plant them near a house and not have any risk of root damage?

    In general what fruit plants can you plant next to house foundations (or closer than about 1.5m) without any risk of damage?
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2017
  2. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Well, the short answer to this is none. Fruit trees, bushes and canes all put out an incredible amount of roots. Of these, the cane fruits, blackberry and raspberry would probably be your best bets since their roots remain flexible compared to apple and other tree born fruits, The bush fruits generally get fairly large over time and that means that their root systems do likewise. I don't plant any of these closer than 4 m to a foundation personally, but I have acreage so I don't worry about space.

    Look at the mature characteristics of what you want to plant, the above ground part of any plant mimics what is below ground, every branch represents a root of the same size.
     
  3. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Unfortunately no part of the garden would be too much more than about 4 metres from the house, but I want to plant fruit trees anyway. If you prune the top does it mean the roots won't grow too big either?

    The tamarillo I have is over metre tall in a pot and it is still very flexible, it doesn't look like it would do any damage, do they get more tough later?
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2017
  4. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Pruning the top of a plant or tree does not reduce the root structure. The best example is a Bonsai Tree, we prune the top and the roots to stunt them to a desired height. I had one oak tree that was 80 years old when I acquired it and it was 12 inches tall, the container was 2 inches deep and 9 x 13. Roots were trimmed 2 times a year, it was watered 4 times a day. I sold the tree for a nice sum to another Bonsai man, he bugged me for two years to sell it to him.

    It isn't hard to keep trees in containers over many years, and they will bear fruit. I like containers that are around 20- 26 inches diameter and 2.5 feet tall for this purpose. You can then move them around with a dolly as you need to. I don't use dwarfs but full size trees, prune them every fall top and bottom, they do great, plus I don't need to worry about roots doing damage to foundations or pipes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2017

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