Cain toad recycling

Discussion in 'General chat' started by John Morrison, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. John Morrison

    John Morrison Junior Member

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    I'm looking at creating a black soldier fly compost farm and I understand they will consume meat and wonder if anyone has tryed to compost whole cane toads. These toads are in abundance in Queensland Australia and are extremely poisonious and would be interested if this poison would have a negative or desasteroius result on the compost farm.any ideas
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Sounds like you need to do an experiment and report backā€¦.
     
  3. John Morrison

    John Morrison Junior Member

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    recycling cane toads responce

    I contacted Rob at University of Queensland with the following letter

    Good morning Rob
    I propose a question or questions re recycling cane toads.I hope this is within your expertise and thank you in advance for your consideration.

    My question is.
    1)Is possible to recycle dead cane toads through a black soldier fly composting farm.
    These fly lava seem to eat anything including meat. Is it possible that the toad toxin would not affect this stage of the fly?
    2) If this is possible is there a toxin left in the lava that could effect chickens or fish ( the destination for the harvested lava)
    3) If this is possible could the eggs be safe for humans

    I am prepared to do a trial in my own property but wonder if this research has been done in the past.

    Robs responce is as follows.

    Hi John


    Thanks for the questions - and they do fall within my area of expertise.


    Adult cane toads contain quite a large load of toxin, which include molecules that are both cardiotoxic, and also highly cytotoxic - both very bad news if they got in to the food chain, as evidenced by the deadly effect on native Australian predators. Our studies have shown that these toxins can be degraded by certain bacteria, so provided the composting system contained the appropriate bacteria, or mimicked the effect of these bacteria, it should be possible to degrade the toxins. That said, if a batch of composted toads did not go as planned, and if low levels of toxin made it through the process, the consequences could be dire. To be safe you would need to do analytical studies to demonstrate that the process did indeed degrade ALL the toxins with a clear safety margin, and you would need to put in place very rigorous SOPS (Standard Operating procedures) to ensure that this outcome was achieved for every batch - most likely including batch to batch toxin testing. My personal view is that this is a lot of work for a bit of extra chook feed, and that the associated risk would not be worth the return.


    If you have a surplus of dead toads I have a better suggestion. Donate them to science. We are currently working to bring a cane toad tadpole trap to market, which uses chemically modified cane toad toxin as a natural attractant - to catch and eliminated tadpoles from water bodies. This requires that we process a large number of dead toads, to extract and purify the toxin. We are still developing our extraction process, so are always in the need of dead cane toads. All we require is that they be frozen - to avoid any bacterial degradation of the toxins.



    Regards




    Rob Capon







    [​IMG]

    So ill take this advise and may even get a few of our toads to help in science

    john​
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    AWESOME! Imagine backing up a freezer truck to the back door of the uni loaded with cane toads....
     
  5. John Morrison

    John Morrison Junior Member

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    Toadaly auwsome

     

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