Buying Seeds

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Antonino Giglio, Jul 15, 2007.

  1. Antonino Giglio

    Antonino Giglio Junior Member

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    Hello dear friends!

    I've been searching (not with much success) where I can buy seeds of plants I wish to grow for my projects.

    They are plants sold by nurseries but haven't found anyone who sell seeds.

    So, where do nursery buy they seed stock from???

    These are some of the seeds I'm looking for:

    Metrosideros excelsa (New Zealand Christamas Tree)
    Melaleuca ericifolia (Swamp Paperbark) (are there melaleucas adapted to dry conditions?)
    Dracaena draco
    Cordyline australis 'Red Sensation'
    Cordyline australis
    Agave desmettiana 'Variegata'
    Mondo grass
    Black mondo
    Cupea mexicana
    Cupea sp.
    Serissa Snoleaves
    Scaevola Edna Walling 'Fan Tastic'
    Banksia spinulosa 'Cherry Candles'
    Acacia cognata
    Hesperozygis Mintia 'Fragrant Purple'
    Echeveria sp.
    Echeveria 'Black Prince'
    Echeveria 'Hen & Chicken'
    Kalanchoe luciae (Flapjack)
    Kalanchoe thrysiflora 'Bronze Sculpture'
    Nandina domestica (Sacred Bamboo)
    Carex 'Frosted Curls'
    Sedum sp.
    Sedum 'Chocolate Sauce'
    Sedum 'Little Missy'
    Coprosma 'Evening Glow'
    Adiantus hispidulum (Rough Maidenhair Fern)
    Dryopteris erythrosora (Autumn Fern)
    Pteris argyraea (Silver Brake Fern)
    Imperata cylindrica (Japanese Blood Grass)
    Hebe sp.
    Hebe 'Turkish Delight'
    Hebe 'Annie's Winter Wander'
    Hebe 'First light'
    Hebe 'Snow Drift'
    Malaleuca 'Little Red'
    Pinus thunbergii 'Yatsabusa'
    Picea pungens 'Montgomery'
    Pinus densiflora 'Low Grow'
    Pinus strobus 'Merrimack'
    Liriope Munroes White
    Liriope muscari 'Royal Purple'
    Phormium tenax 'Bronze Baby'
    Phormium cookianum 'Dark Delight'
    Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue'
    Festuca glauca (Blue Fescue)
    Lomandra sp (check how many differnt one there are)
    Dianella sp (check how many differnt one there are)
    Lomandra confertifolia sp rubiginosa 'Seascape'
    Cycas revoluta
    Kangaroo paw
    Westringia 'Wynyabbie Gem'
    Acacia cognata 'Green Mist'
    Grevillea 'Bonfire'
    Bismarckia nobilis (Bismarck Palm)
    Agave attenuata
    Cordyline stricta congesta
    Cordyline australis
    Hymenosporum flavum 'Australian Beauty'
    Restio tetraphyllus (Plusme Rush or Tassel Cord Rush)
    Prunus lusitanica (Portugal Laurel)
    Acmena smithii 'Hot Flush'
    Leptospermum phylicodes (Kunzea Ericoides)
    Strelitzia reginae (Bird of Paradise)
    Penisettum setaceum 'Rubrum' (Purple Fountain Grass)
    Gazania sp. (check how many differnt one there are)
    Wisteria sinensis (Chinese Wisteria)
    Wisteria sp. (check how many differnt one there are)
    Rosmarinus 'Blue Lagoon'
    Rosmarinus sp. (check how many differnt one there are)
    Canna Tropicanna
    Canna Tropicanna Gold
    Cordyline Caruba Black
    Cordyline Burgundy Spire
    Cordyline Red Fountain
    Dianella Border Silver
    Aeonium arboreum 'Compact Black'
    Aeonium arboreum 'Short Black'
    Aeonium arboreum 'Schwartzkopf'
    Agave attenuata 'Century Plant'
    Agave attenuata 'Tandarra's Tiger'
    Agave celsii
    Agave geminiflora
    Agave guingola
    Agave horrida
    Agave ocahui x attenuata
    Agave parryi 'Truncata'
    Agave parryi parryi 'Parry's Agave'
    Agave potatorum 'Kichiokan'
    Agave stricta nana 'Hedgehog Agave'
    Agave weberi 'Weber Agave'
    Aloe aculeata 'Red Hot Poker Aloe'
    Aloe africana 'Spiny Aloe'
    Aloe 'Black Gem'
    Aloe alooides
    Aloe barberae 'Tree Aloe'
    Aloe bellatula
    Aloe boylei
    Aloe branddraaiensis
    Aloe broomii 'Snake Aloe'
    Aloe cameronii 'Cameron's Aloe'
    Aloe castanea
    Aloe chabaudii
    Aloe chabaudii x excelsa
    Aloe conifera
    Aloe cooperi 'Cooper's Aloe'
    Aloe dewetii
    Aloe dichotoma 'Dragon Tree Aloe'
    Aloe ferox 'Cape Aloe'
    Aloe marlothii
    Aloe mitriformis 'Gold Tooth Aloe'
    Aloe peglerae
    Aloe plicitalis 'Fan Aloe'
    Aloe polyphylla 'Spiral Aloe'
    Aloe rauhii
    Aloe reitzii 'Reitz' Aloe'
    Aloe speciosa 'Tilt Head Aloe'
    Aloe striata 'Coral Aloe'
    Aloe succotrina
    Aloe suprafoliata
    Aloe thraskii 'Dune Aloe'
    Aloe variegata 'Tiger Aloe'
    Aloe vera 'Medicinal Aloe'
    Arthropodium cirrhatum 'Matapouri Bay'
    Beschorneria yuccoides 'Mexican Lily'
    Cordyline australis 'Bronze Spire'
    Cordyline australis 'Burgundy Spire'
    Cordyline australis 'Karo Kiri'
    Cordyline australis 'Peko'
    Cordyline australis 'Pink Sensation'
    Cordyline australis 'Red Star'
    Cordyline banksii 'Purple Sensation PBR
    Cordyline banksii x pumillo 'Red Fountain' PBR
    Cordyline baueri 'Red Sensation'
    Cordyline dracaenoides 'Brazilian Cabbage Tree'
    Cordyline 'Electric Pink'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Black Tango'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Caruba Black'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Green'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Pink & Green'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Red'
    Cordyline fruticosa 'Ruby Red'
    Cordyline stricta 'Congesta'
    Cordyline stricta 'Show Off'
    Cotyledon undulata 'Silver Ruffles'
    Crassula dubia 'Silver Spoon'
    Crassula falcata 'Propeller Plant'
    Dracaena marginata 'Green'
    Dracaena marginata 'Black'
    Dracaena marginata 'Tricolour'
    Echeveria elegans
    Echeveria gibbiflora
    Echeveria 'Alice'
    Echeveria 'After Glow'
    Echeveria 'Berkley'
    Echeveria 'Black Knight'
    Echeveria 'Black Prince'
    Echeveria 'Blue Curl'
    Echeveria 'Cinderella'
    Echeveria 'Crinoline'
    Echeveria 'Delight'
    Echeveria 'Katella'
    Echeveria 'Mauna Loa'
    Echeveria 'Zipper'
    Echeveria runyonii 'Topsy Turvy'
    Echeveria shaviana
    Echeveria subridgida
    Echeveria violescens
    Echeveria x gibbiflora 'Perle von Neurnberg'
    Euphorbia lactea 'Thai Crested'
    Euphorbia triculli 'Firesticks'
    Euphorbia trigona 'Red Devil'
    Furcraea foetida var mediopicta 'Mauritius Hemp'
    Graptopetalum pentandrum 'Mexican Star'
    Kalanchoe thyrsiflora 'Flapjacks'
    Phormium 'Merlot' PBR
    Phormium tenax 'New Zealand Flax'
    Sansevieria trifasciata 'Green'
    Sansevieria trifasciata 'Superba'
    Sansevieria trifasciata 'Silbersee'
    Sansevieria trifasciata 'Yellow & Green'
    Strelitzia juncea 'Leafless Bird of Paradise'
    Yucca elephantipes 'Spineless Yucca'
    Yucca filamentosa 'Bright Edge'
    Yucca filifera 'Golden Sword'
    Yucca gloriosa variegata
    Yucca desmetiana
    Yucca recurvifolia 'Weeping Yucca'

    Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  2. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Antonio,

    I think you left out 'gum trees'... :D :D :D

    Try ebay [and no i am not on their payroll] there are 000s of types of seeds sold there. I have noticed that many of the less common ones are sold seasonally due to shortage of supply. Also I believe that many of the plants you wish to grow may be propogated by tissue culture.

    Tissue culture means they can produce thousands of plants at once and they are a lot more reliable for the wholesaler and reseller than depending on seed or vegetative establishment.

    https://search.ebay.com.au/search/s...=compare&copagenum=1&coentrypage=search&fgtp=

    If anyone has a better source for the eclectic and odd, I would love to see
    it.

    cheers

    floot
     
  3. Fern O.

    Fern O. Junior Member

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    hello Antonio

    Most Landcare groups have seed banks for their indigenous species. And it's best to source seeds grown as local as possible to you.

    Do you know about Diggers, and all the heirloom seed companies, yes?

    bushfoods.net is a good forum site for seed exchange too.

    cheers
    Fern
     
  4. Antonino Giglio

    Antonino Giglio Junior Member

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    I'm not actually looking for indigenous species, I already know where to get seeds and already growing many in my small garden.

    I need to source reliable seeds sellers for all other plants in my list.

    I'm not interested in growing ONLY indigenous species as I'm not indigenous of this country myself...

    And I believe that all plants - weeds included - are useful.

    Cheers! :)
     
  5. Fern O.

    Fern O. Junior Member

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    Yes, well you are on a permaculture forum... it's still best to source your seeds as locally as possible, whether they're indigenous or not... that is if you're going to propagate them where you live.

    Do you know your local seed saver groups?
    Your location states that your in Melbourne... there's one at CERES in Brunswick (contact Aiden at the nursery)...
    Diggers seeds are down in Dromana
    Otway Herbs down here
    they would have some of what you're after...

    Checked your neighbours yet?

    What is your project?
     
  6. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Happy hunting (it is half the fun!)

    Some of what you ask for are not available commercially as they are grown vegetatively
    Others are so rare you would need to contact the relevant plant society to see what you could swap or buy.
    You will be surprised what you can import into Australia. especially if it comes from a reputable nursery and is not botanically related to a commercial crop (tomatoes, sunflowers wheat etc). You can get a list from your department of agriculture of what they will not allow (weeds etc)
    They do seem OK with tissue culture flasks too.

    Of course the local postmaster is required to report you to the authorities for importing seed in our new fascist regime so take care.

    Most local Plant Nursery seed is set up for buyers of parsley and petunias, not collectors
    You will find, searching the web, a great number of small specialist societies and seed collectors that could help.
    Try also specific plant discussion-list groups.

    Procuring and growing that list should take you a good part of your life.

    Happy hunting (it is half the fun!)
     
  7. marena

    marena New Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    G'day!
    Just joined up. Came across your request. I happen to have a small nursery and can tell you about some of the things you want to know. Many nurseries propagate their own stock from cuttings, seeds, etc. We do. But we also buy plugs and tubes. Plugs are trays of 128, 288, or 512 seedlings of a variety. These are usually herb, annual and some quick perrenial varieties. Tubes are individual mini pots either slow growing or propagated, typically 2" in diameter, which we then pot on, grow and sell. Tissue culture stock is often in tubes.
    Seed available commercially can vary in price and minimum quantity from supplier to supplier. Herbs are typically $15-20 minimum buy. Trees can be priced per thousand. I think they will sell to you if you want those sorts of quantities.
    I happen to have many of the things you are after. I don't have the time to go through them all, but I suggest you start by learning how to propagate the easier things, like many of the echeverias, and get one, and go from there. For the things you are willing to buy, get a "Horticulture" magazine. You might have to try a few news agencies to find one, but it is packed with industry suppliers. You can phone a few of them, and ask for a catalogue. Most of them will oblige. (Some MAY ask for your nursery name, but most don't care as long as you abide by their terms of trade) Some will have an "availability list". That is a list of stock currently saleable. These are usually leftovers from propagation orders, and whatever their reliable sellers are. Most trees, shrubs and perrenials are available like this. Minimum orders per variety can vary from 22 tp 256, depending on who you are dealing with. They also have a minimum number of trays or minimum dollar value you are expected to buy. They charge for freight, for trays.
    Sometimes they only allow registered growers to grow a particular variety. So you can't even buy the seedlings. Sometimes the plants are protected by "plant breeders rights- PBR" meaning it is illegal to propagate them without permission. Or sell them without a lable. Usually, once a variety has been around a few years, they remove the PBR status.(once they have made their money from it, and the trend has moved elsewhere)Sometimes, you can propagate and sell it, but you are not allowed to use the name because they own it- like the Euphorbia Fireworks I think it is called.
    If you have questions about a particular couple of varieties, let me know.
    Marena
     
  8. mnauen

    mnauen New Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    Hi there,
    Those of the named varieties you have listed can not be grown from seed but only reproduced vegetatively. Seeds of many species on the list, including the Agave may be available from Arizona Cactus Nursery. Send an email to and ask for an email copy of his seed list. I have grown plants from his seeds for many years. He specialises in Cacti and other succulents.
    mnauen
     
  9. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    A Google seach will give you lots of sources

    look at where your plants come from and seach that country.

    You may need to contact specialist growers and Botanic Gardens and Garden Clubs for more unusual varieties.
    Usually you have too be seen as a collector or as having something of significance to swap before being given entre to the 'front door.'
    I know of at least one "secret" garden club / cum collectors network in Sydney.
    You need to be invited to join.
    (I have never made the grade I'm afraid)

    Most nurseries are interested in mass production of popular varieties -not the rare or unusual.
    They cannot afford to do otherwise.

    SEE
    USA
    https://www.onewest.net/~klack/Garden/seed_sources.htm
    https://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/her ... ning/58457
    https://www.hawaiiseed.org/issues/sustai ... ed-sources

    Australia

    https://www.anbg.gov.au/anbg/tree.seeds.html
    https://www.anbg.gov.au/seed-suppliers/index.html
    https://www.nativeseeds.com.au/categorie ... =57&c=8724

    ETC
     
  10. NurseDan

    NurseDan Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    Seeing what other ppl see as waste as a resource is a great trait to have indeed, however even though some weed species may be useful to us, they may cause havoc when introduced to certain ecosystems therefore we must consider the effects of planting it BEFORE planting it(or encouraging it:p). Most local councils will have guides on notorious weeds in the area, might pay to have a quick read:)

    In regards to seeds, ive been getting alot of mine from DIGGERS, they have great heirloom varieties! Only problem is they take awhile to send orders.....bit tooo 'relaxed' sometimes:p With a huge list like that id say you'll be sourcing them from a few different seed suppliers, best to start local and go from there:)
     
  11. helgecko

    helgecko Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    Yes! this is very important.
    I agree that "weed" can be a matter of attitude in some ways, and that uses can be found for (probably) all plants. BUT, as I'm sure we all know, plants do have minds of their own, and they don't respect the boundaries that we humans try to impose. A plant that may have a dozen uses and seem very tame on your property may very easily jump the fence and wreak havoc in native bushland. This is a very real and very serious problem.

    When I have time a bit later, I might go through your list and point out a few potential offenders.
     
  12. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    This report surprised me.
    https://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/200 ... 568-2.html

    I had a friend buy some native grass seed from Queensland (She is in NSW)
    The seed/grass flowered too early to be germinated by the local bug that normally did the job.

    Then again maybe they have a point about genetic diversity and a broad gene pool.
     
  13. helgecko

    helgecko Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    That is a very interesting article, thanks for pointing it out Michael.

    I agree with it to some degree, but it is an extremely complicated topic.
    I'd love to write a lengthy response, but I'm at work and really shouldn't even be writing this :oops:

    I'll have to get back to you on that.... :)
     
  14. NurseDan

    NurseDan Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    Thanks for sharing that article Michael, i ended up getting the actual full text article and having a read -

    https://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi- ... 5/PDFSTART

    'natives not best for rehabilitation' may be a bit misleading, its talking about how people are sourcing seeds for large scale native regeneration projects. Meaning they are not scrutinizing planting natives however they are suggesting better outcomes could be achieved from obtaining the 'same' native seeds from other areas. They are suggesting that seeds obtained from other areas will introduce greater gene diversity and may produce stronger, more resilient seeds in the future.

    Very interesting read and from an evolutionary perspective makes alot of sense!
     
  15. helgecko

    helgecko Junior Member

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    Re: Buying Seeds

    "Natives not best for revegetation" is a dreadfully misleading title for that article.

    For most people "native" simply means "native to Australia", whereas in the original paper they seem to be weighing up using strictly local native seed against using less-locally sourced (but still "native") seed.

    When doing bush regeneration and/or planting near remnant vegetation (native bush that wasn't planted), accepted wisdom is to plant from seed or genetic stock that could have only have gotten there under natural circumstances. This is known as "local provenance stock", and means that the area is being kept as close to natural, or what would naturally occur, as possible. Because different plants spread differently (ie wind-blown seed compared to plants that spread only vegetatively) "local provenance" is a fairly hazy term that varies from species to species, and from geographical area to geographical area.

    As the paper points out though, in some circumstances the local genetic stock may be severely depleted. So if there's only a couple of individual plants of one species that are considered "local", you may need to look further afield for slightly less local examples of that species to collect seed from.
    This is for two reasons: 1) if you're doing a large-scale revegetation project, you need a lot of plants, and you shouldn't collect more than 10% of the available seed off any one plant, or you're interfering too much with the natural regeneration potential of the ecosystem that you're collecting from. 2) The seeds from only 2 (or a few) plants used to revegetate a large area means there isn't enough genetic diversity, and the whole establishing ecosystem is very vulnerable.
     
  16. Mokurai

    Mokurai New Member

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    Hi Marena,
    I am interested in buying a Pinus Thunbergii ...preferably a tree but as I am told there are none around in the nurseries seeds would be fine too. I actually tried to buy seeds on the internet in America but Amazon and others tell me they do not ship to Australia. So I have emailed Quarantine to find out what the go is there. Then I tripped over this site and saw there are possibly Japanese Black Pines here in Melbopurne after all. I have a few trees that I call two men Bonsai as my wife does not want any in the ground. I use the excuse putting them in the ground makes the trunks grow thicker quicker :) I actually put a Cupressus Macrocarpa in the ground whilst we were living in Creswick ...north of Ballarat... and after pruning it for three or four years and it was taller than my 1.8m ladder would allow me to reach I let it go. Later on I visited it and it has grown into a pyramid shape and actually looks quite good, albeit not Bonsai shaped any more. I also left a Pinus Thunbergii in the ground at Elizabeth South Australia when we were flooded out in 1995. Lost interest abnout then as my wife had lopped the top off it and here you see a trunk rising to three feet hacked at the top. It did have branches styled in the bonsai fashion but I could not envisage it looking nice after that. Thanks.
     

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