Bread

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by ~Tullymoor~, Sep 22, 2005.

  1. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    https://www.rightword.com.au/ptero/article.asp?id=3&type=2

    I found this recipe fun and easy(very close to yours forest...thank you for the info) but I think I'll get some white or other flours as I made it with my wheat flour and, well, the chooks got the laof...it was heavy and not nice. It smelt nice though.

    What's the nicest flour? I wanna make that pig out bread where you scoff the lot with jam and cream maybe ..yum!

    Still going to do the sour dough cos that's what I have all my sundrieds (olives/toms/artichoke hearts) and brie and salami with AND a red :D
     
  2. forest

    forest Junior Member

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    My favourite flour is corn and barley but I also like a mixture of rye and white. You can buy a nice wholemeal or wholegrain that will give you a delicious scoffing loaf. I don't know where you live, Tully, but if you're close to a town and they have a bulk food store, buy a kilo of flour and bake it and keep working through their flours until you find a favourite.

    Yeah, that recipe is very similar to mine. That's the basic bread recipe - it will work with any bread. Just be careful adding the water, some flours take more, some take less.

    Did you pig's loaf rise? You can proof your yeast before cooking with it, that makes sure it's live and active. If you need to know how to do this, just tap.
     
  3. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    Oh, it rose and was lovely golden brown and looked and smelled perfect...it just tasted like crap and was a bit, well, alot, heavy and somewhat dry/crumbly...
    Will work my way through the flours, thanks again.
    Oh, I did put the yeast with the water and waited til it did the bubbly thing before adding it. I really enjoyed making it. My stomach muscles ached from the kneading, but it was all good. Very satisfying, even if we didn't get to eat more than just the end crusts, they were yummy. :D
     
  4. forest

    forest Junior Member

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    Tully, it sounds like your yeast was good and you did the required kneading. I'd say it was a rising problem. The bread rises in the oven when baking but it needs to rise twice before that. Not doing it properly can cause a very heavy loaf.

    Do you have a bread maker?
     
  5. baringapark

    baringapark Junior Member

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    Thanks Christopher I shall try less starter. Also, what do I do with the 'new' mix of starter. I kept a little of the original and added flour and water. Do I leave it out to stew or put it in the fridge? If I leave it out I guess it will become more and more sour. I cannot always be around to make the bread when the starter is ready so what do I do?

    I have heard of restaurants with 20 year old starter. Obviously it is replenished along the way, but where would they keep it to prevent excessive sourness?

    thanks in advance

    E

    ps My piggies are very heavy looking and are due in about 2 weeks time Tully. I am stressing like you wouldn't believe. I have been giving the girls a bit of pre-natal massage and trying to feel movement in their bellies to no avail. Will keep you all posted and thanks for asking!!
     
  6. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    Hmmmmm, that's the bit I don't like, hence my ? re breadmaker. I see Forest asked if you had one. (I know you do!!!!! :shock: {me too :oops: }) Why Forest? Why? Can I make all those yummy recipes with my breadmaker? Can I? Huh? Can I?
     
  7. forest

    forest Junior Member

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    You most certainly can make those recipes in a bread maker. I have a very old breadmaker, it's probably 10 years old, and I make my recipes in it sometimes.

    What I was going to suggest is that you make your bread in a bread maker until you get your recipes right. Testing stuff in the breadmaker is easy, when you get a recipe you really like, stick with it but do it by hand, if that's what you want to do. Personally, I think hand kneaded bread gives you a better textured loaf, but you have to knead it for between 8 - 10 minutes and the rising area needs to be between 23 - 30C. If you don't have those conditions, you'll get a heavy loaf.

    Tam and Tully, and anyone else, I'm happy to answer questions about breadmaking. My dad was a baker and I've been baking for yonks. I did a bread making by hand thread on another forum. If you like, I could repeat it here. :)
     
  8. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Elizabeth,

    I love your pigs, too. (always wanted to tell you that...)

    The key is to keep feeding the culture. Dawn is off in the vega planting crops like a woman posessed, and she is farm fermentation expert, but my understanding is that like wine, once the sugars eating beasties die out because of lack of sugar, things turn acid.

    keeping a percentage back to keep your clture is what Dawn does.

    So the key may be to keep feeding your culture new flour and sugar, and removing a portion (I'l ask Dawn whe she gets back).

    Sorry of I am vague but I must have zoned out for those conversations a bit more than I should have :oops: :lol:

    Good luck!

    C
     
  9. baringapark

    baringapark Junior Member

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    Hi Christopher

    I did keep some starter back and fed it. But do I now keep it in the fridge or on the bench?

    thanks

    E
     
  10. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Elizabeth,

    Um, okay, Dawn, our resident expert in so may things (including keeping me in line and fermenting food) says "if her starter is NOT bubbling, and smells sour the culture may be done, and the best thing to do is to start over."

    Dawn further says "if the starter is as fermented as you want, you can reduce the activity of the culture by putting it in the fridge. Otherwise keep it out where it can grow. Tell Elizabeth that since we don't have a fridge, we just keep the starter alive by feeding it flower, and tell them I DO NOT use sugar in the starter... fer cryin' out loud, now get outside and lay some rocks! That kitchen isn't going to finish itself. What do you expect, the rocks to jump up and place themselves...?....."

    Well, thank you, Dawn, for sharing that, or most of it.....

    Well, hey, so, um, yes, there is Dawns opinion at greater length than you asked for.

    Um, gotta run, uh (sheepish grin), got work to do....

    Good luck!

    C
     
  11. forest

    forest Junior Member

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    Baringpark, you can usually see and smell the changes that occur in sourdough starter as it's doing its thing. You'll see and smell it developing. It will produce gas bubbles and change from the flour colour to a yellow or a whitish-grey colour, depending on what type of flour you used.

    It will have a sour smell and will eventually form froth or bubbles around the edges. That is the carbon dioxide gas coming out.

    When it's fully fermented, put it in the fridge and feed it once a week.

    You're right about the very old starters. As they age they develop complex flavours, much like wine does. My son, who is a chef at a flash restaurant here, uses a starter that is 30 years old. Their dinner rolls are magnificent.

    Good luck. :)
     

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