bisphenol in plastic wrappings etc. found to be toxic

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by hedwig, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    Perhaps you can read the following link but it is written in German.
    A plastic softener called bisphenol was found to be toxic for the brain developpement even if it is consumed in very small amounts.
    Bisphenol is found in all plastics, wrappings plastic bottles, plates etc. It is one of the basic plastic ingredients.


    https://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/mensch/0,1518,389538,00.html
     
  2. Guest

    https://translate.google.com/transl....de/wissenschaft/mensch/0,1518,389538,00.html

    Here is the translation. Still a bit tricky to read.

    Very interesting study Hedwig. Looks like they may argue this for some time... The baby pic will immediately rouse support from mums and the breast feeding associations, I think. And make people think... I imagine they could link this to studies on raised intellect in breast fed babes.

    It may also address and hopefully limit the development of some plastics.
     
  3. frosty

    frosty Junior Member

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    thanks for posting this hedwig - it is good to see more studies taking place ( although I didnt check it out because I sure cant read German :lol: )

    independant researchers have known all plastic is toxic for a long time but those making money from it keep on obfuscating the issue - same as they did for so long with cigarette smoking

    I never keep any food in plastic and wont eat or drink anything that comes in plastic

    I would bet plastic is why on the average people seem to be getting more stupid [​IMG]

    frosty
     
  4. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

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    but if you don not live self-sufficient you cannot avoid it. Milk cheese everything is wrapped in plastic. Here it is even worse becaue there are no glass milk bottles (to give back), and sometimes in supermarkets you can only buy half fruits wrapped in plastic (I hate it!). People buy water in plastic bottles, because they tink it is better than tap water (perhaps it ios?) Organic stores does not do better. But I lile the study because we have to think of other things than on petrol based materials.
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    BPA, Two Other Chemicals Linked to Infertility

    10/14/2011 11:14:34 AM
    by Keith Goetzman

    . . .The interesting, and rather alarming, thing here is that two of the chemicals have been banned in the United States for years. HCB, a pesticide, has been banned here since1984, though it is still used in some other countries and may be created as an impurity in the making of other pesticides and chemicals. PCBs, a class of industrial fluids used mostly in electrical equipment, have been banned since 1979, but their persistence in the environment means they still show up in the blood of more than 95 percent of Americans older than 12.

    Environmental Health News points out that “causes of infertility are numerous, ranging from hormonal imbalances, to defects of the uterus, to misshapen sperm, low sperm count or low sperm motility in men.” But these new findings are worth considering given what we’ve learned in recent years:

    Some scientists now theorize that endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the environment also can reduce fertility. Endocrine disruptors are a class of more than 1,200 chemicals that can mimic or block hormones, including estrogen, the primary female sex hormone involved in pregnancy.

    “These chemicals may affect the way hormones regulate many aspects of our bodies, potentially even the ability to get pregnant,” said Laura Vandenberg, a reproductive scientist at Tufts University.

    It’s unclear yet whether these findings are unique to the IVF community, or if we are just seeing the tip of the iceberg of a problem that extends beyond this population,” said Tracey Woodruff, a reproductive health scientist in the division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center who was not involved in the studies.
    . . . .


    Read more: https://www.utne.com/Wild-Green/BPA-Two-Other-Chemicals-Linked-to-Infertility.aspx#ixzz1bruBJT3M

    Read more: https://www.utne.com/Wild-Green/BPA-Two-Other-Chemicals-Linked-to-Infertility.aspx#ixzz1brtxZvGN
     
  6. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Mom's BPA Exposure Linked to Behavior Problems in Tots
    In utero exposure to the organic compound bisphenol A (BPA) -- widely used in the manufacture of plastics, including cups, food containers, and even credit card receipts -- was associated with behavior disruptions at age 3, particularly among girls, researchers found.
    For each tenfold increase in gestational urinary BPA concentration, there was an adjusted increase in anxiety scores (β=7, 95% CI 1.7 to 12) among a cohort of 244 children, according to Joe M. Braun, PhD, of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues.

    The increase was pronounced among girls (β=12, 95% CI 4.7 to 20) but minimal among boys (β=1.3, 95% CI −5.8 to 8.4), the researchers reported online in Pediatrics.

    They urged, however, that their finding of a stronger association for girls be interpreted with caution because of their "modest" sample size and low statistical power to test for this interaction.

    Exposure to BPA is virtually universal in industrialized countries;
    https://www.medpagetoday.com/PublicHealthPolicy/EnvironmentalHealth/29191
     
  7. Try Reason

    Try Reason Junior Member

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    Was on to this recently. I don't drink from plastic but we do keep our left overs in plastic containers. The "Clip-it" brand from NZ are advertised as Bisphenol free so we've switched over to it. Expensive but it is well designed and tough. We don't have a lot of food related plastic otherwise. The main thing that concerns me now is milk containers. We use a lot of milk! Need a share cow. Apparently there is links from Bisphenol to male hormone interruption too.
     
  8. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I'm part of a raw milk cooperative. Our milk comes in plastic, but I transfer it to glass. Lasts better in the fridge too.
     
  9. Try Reason

    Try Reason Junior Member

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    That would be just perfect! I have fantasies of living in a community where we all take turns at growing our own meat and tending to milking cows, goats/sheep. The only food that would require shopping for would probably be the big staples like some cereals, sugar etc. but it would be relatively easy to go completely self sufficient.
     
  10. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    There are some aztec grains that even; that you might be able to grow.

    Supermarkets don't sell much real food any more Mostly is processed crap.
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Well, thank you everyone because this thread & my vet just help detect what is wrong with my Black Lab / Chesapeake Bay Retriever. She has been sneaking drinks from our pond for water chestnuts and the water sitting in the plastic is what made her ill.

    She is slowly recovering. :D

    Thanks again all.
     
  12. Don Hansford

    Don Hansford Junior Member

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    Good to hear - could you give us a quick rundown on the symptoms she was showing? May help someone else in a similar situation.
     
  13. Try Reason

    Try Reason Junior Member

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    Wow. Glad you got the break through before it got any worse!
     
  14. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Rubbing face and muzzle till raw, hot spots on hind quarters, itchy belly.
     
  15. Don Hansford

    Don Hansford Junior Member

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    Thanks - I'll store that one away for future reference.
     
  16. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Sounds like it might be a good idea then to replace the plastic pond with something else-half wine barrels?
    Is this stuff getting into your water chestnuts? and then you eat them.
     
  17. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    well, my plastic pond is a food grade water barrel cut in half. This has made me want to change this area with design & make a more natural pond. It's only been in use 1 year.
     

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