Biogas Powered Cremation

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by Lumbuck Thornton, Feb 1, 2014.

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Biogas Powered Cremation

  1. Donation to Science (and eventual fossil gas cremation)

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  2. Conventional in ground burial in a lawn cemetery

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  3. In ground burial in a designated bush cemetery

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  4. Biogas Barrel Burial and eventual composting and mulching

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  5. Biogas Fired Cremation

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  6. Fossil Fuel Gas Cremation

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  7. Fracked Gas Cremation

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  8. Indian Vulture Burial

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  1. Lumbuck Thornton

    Lumbuck Thornton Junior Member

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    Cremation is the cheapest form of departure allowed in western worlds but the mercury air pollutants, greenhouse gas emissions and wasting of fossil fuel (sometimes fracked gas) is not appreciated by everyone left behind.

    Conventional in ground burial is even more expensive, wastes the fossil fuels needed to dig the hole, run the mower over and locks away the nutrients.

    Bush burials appear to cost even more again with pest and weed control being the main ongoing impact cost although the nutrients are reused and the need for a box appears to be optional if disposable bags are allowed.

    I know the raw gas can be pretty rough, maybe not reach high enough temperatures because of water vapour, CO2 and other impurities that could interfere with the heating by efficient burning of the methane. It might take longer.

    Most biogas electricity generation systems are quite large and mixed with other fossil fuels. In other situations it is used to supplement fossil (sometimes fracked gas) supplies for heating water etc in industrial processes.

    With the right burners, biogas can still burn pretty hot and it may need some supplement of fossil gas to make it work.

    The regulation designs for crematoriums have a second afterburner on the stack and maybe this would still have to be fossil gas.

    Would it be possible to be cremated using biogas from renewable sources once living?

    Could it be that barrel burial to produce biogas for some deceased might involve cheap rental of a barrel and space in a large greenhouse at the cemetery for a few years after which the remaining organics are composted and mulched. (Maybe the ultimate way for a permi to go and comeback and go several times over as energy, nutrients and produce !!) The biogas from the barrels could be used to help green power the conventional crematorium for those wanting to still go up in smoke and maybe pay a premium for this but it could still turn out cheaper than other methods.

    In short, would some people still want to be cremated in effect with the ongoing farts of departed environmentalists ??

    All the other costs are still going to keep rising. If there were not enough of these green cremation customers and they all decided to go the barrel as well (floating with lots of other putrid organic wastes) then there are probably other uses this biogas could be put to in order to conserve or avoid use of running out fossil gas (including fracked gas!)

    Could be an interesting debate !:envy:
     
  2. Rick Larson

    Rick Larson Junior Member

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    I want to be composted then fed to nutty trees.
     
  3. Unmutual

    Unmutual Junior Member

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    Thrown in a hole with a tree planted on top. I have been toying with the idea of a nut type tree just so future generations can make crude jokes.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Regular hot composting for me. And burn my bones and spread them around when it's done.
     
  5. LJH

    LJH Junior Member

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    I live in the Southwest USA and have always hoped I'll know when I'm 'ready' and have the strength to wander far out into the desert and desiccate into a natural mummy. Something cool for backpackers to find some day. But I also really like eco4560's idea. If you end up in one of Geoff's compost piles there won't even be many bones to spread (remembering the road-kill wallaby story).
     

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