Best plants for wettish soils

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Raymondo, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    The local community garden, an old set of tennis courts over a hectare or two, has one large area in the SW corner that is at the bottom of a hill which wraps right round the western side of the garden. The old courts were cut into this hill. It is much 'wetter' in that area I guess because of water draining from the hill. In heavy rain it's a shallow pond. They have in fact decided to build a pond there. The whole area is heavy clay and the area was ripped before any work began.
    What herbs/fruits/vegetables would enjoy such conditions? Cranberries and celery come to mind. Others?
     
  2. cottager

    cottager Junior Member

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  3. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Thanks for that link. Some of those will be good for the pond and its edge when done. For the rest though the area dries out between rain events so whatever is grown there needs to be able to manage. I was thinking just of plants that like dampish conditions. By the way, water chestnuts won't grow here. I've tried many times but the season is too short and cool for them to form anything worth eating. I've tried a number of times without success. Shame, I like them.
    Watercress might work.
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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  5. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Thank you. Yet more useful links. I will pass all these on to the community garden people.
     
  6. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    I have heavy clay that can hold a lot of water, so I get fruit trees that are grafted onto rootstock that works with wet soil, they usually have a description on them. Blackberries are perfect where it's damp. Mine are on poles and wires so they don't get out of control and are easy to pick.

    But probably the most important lesson I've learned is to mulch it heavily, like a hand depth of mowed weeds and grass, never let it be exposed to sun or to rain, which can pound it down terribly. Replenishing the mulch often, because the soil will soak it up, it will break down, adding good amounts of organic matter to the soil, allowing for air pockets, good bacteria and fungi, and giving it great tilth.

    In the fall try to put as many layers of manure and compost and mowed grasses as you can, so they will be improving your soil all the time. :)
     
  7. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Kang kong?
     
  8. Raymondo

    Raymondo Junior Member

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    Kang kong...good one. Not sure how long a season it needs but worth a try. Thanks eco4560.

    Excellent advice sweetpea, thank you. Fortunately, the community garden folk are working hard at obtaining whatever mulch they can lay their hands on. The garden has been going since last November and already, in the first planted and mulched areas, the soil looks in better shape. Heavy clay can be a bugger to work with but it does usually have good mineral content so lots of organic matter is the ticket.
     

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