Bean and rice recipe needed please...Christopher?????

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by baringapark, Dec 4, 2005.

  1. baringapark

    baringapark Junior Member

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    Hi all

    I love eating bean and rice and am after a couple of nice recipes. I know Christopher is keen on veg food and am hoping he and any others can provide me with some delicious recipes. thanks

    Elizabeth
     
  2. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Hi Elizabeth,

    I am really a five trick pony in the kitchen, though I can combine them all and come up with about 239 variatiions on simple themes...

    We have lots of coconuts, and we make coconut rice, which is using coconut milk (water that has soaked in shredded coconut meat) for the water, which gives the rice a nice fatty taste, and increases the nutrition of the rice.

    (BTW, the left over partially defatted coconut meat is wonderful feed for the chooks....)

    Now, for rice and beans, a common dish throughout the Caribbean, we use a percentage of well cooked beans mixed in with the rice, and cook them together. If you ever come to Belize you will see that this is the staple food of many communities.

    In Costa Rica they have another variation called Gallo Pinto, which is similar and tasy, too. They use black beans, whilc here in Belize we mostly use red kidney beans.

    In other parts of Central America they call it Moors y Christos (Moors and Christians)....

    We have several varieties of beans we eat here. I am partial to the pigeon pea, which is a nice bean for eating and a valuable plant for pioneering an area (useful for breaking up heavy clay soil, makes firewood, supresses grass, fixes nitrogen, etc). You can boil it and eat it, with, or without chiles, garlic and onions, and Dawn makes a curried pigeon pea with yellow ginger, white ginger, pepper, and other things, that is very tasty.

    Garbanzos can't grow here (we tried), so being able to make a hummus is nice for variety. It happens once every few months.

    My favorite pigeon pea dish is faux hummus. Instead of using garbanzo beans, we use pigeon pea. Take in your well cooked pigeon pea, mash it in a bowl with enough water to make it mash easily (using water from the beans pot), then add in diced garlic and lime juice, chile pepper, some salt and tahini, to taste, and it is, ooooooooh soo good!

    Faux hummus is good on bread, with rice, as a dip for veggies, whatever uses you can find.

    We also have cow pea, which is a red variety of the black eyed pea brought into Belize by CARDI (Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute, a wonderful resource), and this bean has the advantage over other species of being indeterminate. Given enough water, it grows, and grows, and grows. One plant can produce for months, and you can havest dried beans off the plant, while further out the runner there are fresh green beans, which boil, steam and stir fry nicely, and out at the end are flowers. It is hyper productive, caqn be grown as a cover crop, and we have mostly stopped growing red kidney and black beans because the return in calories expended to calories harvested is so much more appealing with the cow pea.

    Cow pea has a dry taste, which I think is the most serious impediment to farmers planting it. The red kidney bean is a much tastier bean, but much less versatile, and cultural preferrences have kept it from being more widely adapted.

    I like cowpea because it can be eaten as a vegetable, too, which is nice....

    Um, I see I am not coming up with lots of recipes. :oops:

    We basically boil beans every day. Dawn spices them different ways, I do too. I like beans with lots of chile, Dawn prefers hers milder. I like taking beans and doing things with them, like the faux hummus, and refried beans:

    Refried beans: Take well boiled beans, drain off water, mash beans with fork, using some water from beans pot. Add salt. In a pan, lightly fry chile pepper, onions and garlic, until onions are well cooked. Take mashed beans, mix into hot frying pan. Fry lightlyly, stirring constantly, until the mixture is drieish. As beans are removed from heat, add any other fresh spice (cilantro is very nice, and a traditional accompaniment for beans in Latin American food, for example), and then set aside.

    Most refried beans is black beans, but red kidney, cowpea, and pigeon pea will all work well, as will yard long bean, etc.

    This is a good companion to rice, but locally, especially in Mestizo/Hispanic communities, this is eaten using stale corn tortillas fried in coconut oil. Add some grated cheese, some hot sauce sprinkled on, some chopped vegetables and you now have "garnaches" or "tostadas".

    Garnaches and tostadas are good Mexican style finger food, allegedly they go well with good beer, and I can say they go great with good conversation! You can set up all the ingredients, including some diced onion and tomatoe, on a table and have everyone eat from the table.

    A bottle of good hot sauce to use sprinkled on the tostadas is good for everyone. You will get competitions going to see who eats the most pepper.

    You may substitute fried tortillas with dried toast for the same sort of meal....

    There are many links on line with more precise recipes, better than "take a bunch of this, add some of that, fry lightly, add something else, to taste and serve, enjoy!" Our food is dictated by what we have since we strive to avoid buying food, especially imported food, and I am a measure-by-eye kind of guy, and enjoy eating my mistakes!

    Here are some links that will provide more info, with actual quantities of ingredients!~

    Good luck, and if one of them works best for you, let me know!

    C

    https://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/cat/486/0.shtml
    https://www.backofthebox.com/recipes/rice_beans.html
    https://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,s ... ns,FF.html
     
  3. sab

    sab Junior Member

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    We eat 'mongo' quite often. Basically boil mung beans till they're soft - about 30 minutes. (1 cup goes a long way as a topping for rice)

    Fry up some onions and garlic and tomatoes (and any meat if you want more flavour - ground beef, chicken or bacon) and mix into the cooked beans. Sometimes we add cubes of pumpkin and eggplant to the beans while they're cooking and camote tops (sweet potato leaves) or malungay (Mohringa Oleifolia) at the very end . Season it with soy sauce or stock.

    Another really simple dish I like was brown lentils cooked together with brown rice in approximately equal quantities together with a few whole garlic cloves and onion chunks (pumpkin goes well with it too) Serve it with Soy sauce and butter or olive oil.
     
  4. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    OOOOOOH Windgeenut!

    You eat moringa olefifeira (sp)! Wow! How do you eat it?

    We have several trees, and lots of literature from various sources talking about it, saying it is wonderful and highly nutritious, etc, but we live where people do not eat it, so noone to emulate or imitate. How do we eat it? Or, more interesting, how do YOU eat it?

    Thanks,

    C
     
  5. sab

    sab Junior Member

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    Just strip young leaves off the stems and use in stews.

    I like it in mongo but since you eat a lot of coconut milk there's another dish here which is basically fish stew with any fish, onions, mohringa leaves and a few chilis in coconut milk - I'll ask around to see what else the locals use it in.
     

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