atherton tablelands 1/4 acre

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by madi sparrow, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. madi sparrow

    madi sparrow Junior Member

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    Olah,

    I have 1012m2 of beautiful soil (for the plants, not for the bloody foundations of the house we are trying to build!) on the tablelands above cairns. I guess its sub-tropical. Hot and very wet summers, cold and dryish winters. Generally 5 degrees cooler then cairns, thankfully.

    I am building a house and a big circus shed on the land with my flatmate. When buildings are finished we will each have a cabin attached by a shared kitchen/bathroom area, and half a shed each.

    We have a drake and three ducks that free range (unless i have just done a big planting... they do like to dig up fresh seedlings) and three bantams chooks in a dome. And two guinea pigs that mow the areas with surface roots that damage the mower. And a dog that keeps away the bushturkeys (a very important job in this area - I couldn't grow anything before we got her!)

    We just got the bore connected so I can finally start planting (after owning the land for more then a year!) At the moment i am just in the mulch-and-pidgeon pea stage. Got a kilo of alfalfa seeds and one of chia from the health food store and have thrown handfuls of those onto the mulch too... a lovely little green carpet has emerged. Plus I couldn't resist sticking a couple of trees in last season.

    The jackfruit is already 4m high, the black sugarcane is almost ready for chopping and replanting, the chocolate sapote is supporting a billion greenants and 4 nest even though it
    is only 2m high. Had my first passionfruit last week and most exciting is the bunch of bananas that is peeking out from the bananas. I don't know what sort they are but they are only about 2.5m high, so i guess a dwarf variety. Present from a friend.

    And ebay! Ebaying plants and seeds like a demon. Now I have a huge line up of trees and plants in pots settling into their new climate... plant out in a few weeks, and hopefully all the seeds that I potted will be ready to go in a few weeks after that. I have discovered an addiction to new varieties... i have 11 sorts of eggplants, about 9 capsicum, 3 okra varieties... stacks of different pumpkin, melons, cucumber, chillis...

    I would like to attached the garden plan I finished this morning. I need to figure out how to stick a jpg in... I haven't marked where all the shrubs and annuals and small plants will go... Now to see how closely I stick to it...

    Would love any feedback you have... plants you think will or won't work up here etc.

    Looking forward to the journey, and to getting to know you all :hi:

    Madi
     
  2. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Ebay bad IMO, act much more locally. Our planet needs it!

    Think about it this way with regards to ebay.

    You get a purchase. You waste time and energy to pack it, and get to a post office to mail it. Was this a bulk trip? Did you use a car?
    Now the seeds / plant uses lots of gas & oil in the ways of infrastructure, lighting, road maintenance, and so on, and that's before you even paid the post office yet.
    You finally pay the post office, and it goes through tons of electrically supplied machines, to go into a vehicle that uses more fuel, to be shipped to another postal facility, or multiple ones depending on how far it went.
    Finally, it gets to the post office intended, and sits till someone else puts it in a vehicle and ships it again to the person you intended it to get to.


    That's a lot of hands, fuel, etc, just for something that could be used for good in your own local, and still make $$$ See where I am coming from? Permaculture is way more then just ways to garden / produce food.

    On the flip side, I am being a bit of a seed whore. I am learning how to keep the seeds of the varieties I like and work well here so I do not have to buy them ever again. It's win win, so with that said, good luck & welcome.
     
  3. Try Reason

    Try Reason Junior Member

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    Hi Madi,

    I'm probably at the other end of the sub-tropical 'gradient' where it is bordering more on temperate than full tropical. I don't have a lot of experience with tropicals but I'd sure be growing a few varieties of mango, a cherimoya and a grumichama. A jelly palm would be fun too! I plan on trying these locally myself but they would most likely thrive more readily in your climate.
     
  4. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Curramore posted an expanded list in Top 10 Fruit Trees that would work for you.

    https://forums.permaculture.org.au/...0-quot-critical-fruit-trees&p=81475#post81475

     
  5. madi sparrow

    madi sparrow Junior Member

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    You rock SOP, and Try Reason, I had forgotten about grumachuma, thank you! I have a yellow one sitting in a pot that I had forgotten to stick in the plan! :)
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Just remember about your succession plantings on a garden space of that size.

    Don't be afraid to throw in more Icecream Beans, or Acacias/Casuarinas, or any of the other exotic Fabaceae to get some canopy cover (or groundcovers) and then hack them back later for mulch..
     
  7. madi sparrow

    madi sparrow Junior Member

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    I had never realised icecream beans were nitrogen fixing?! Thanks... i managed to get 15 seeds today, and I love watching trees grow... so in they go. Plus the dog snapped one today, so need some new life to replace the sad hole. Since I threw her ball behind the treeling, I can't even get properly cranky at her. Only me :(

    Thanks again SOP :)
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    They nitrogen-fix, but to the best of my internet sleuthing, exotic fixers have to be inoculated so they bond with the best rhizobia. Foreign fixers will bond with foreign rhizobia, but the relationship could be better, to dumb it down a tad.

    So, even if they aren't fixing as well as they could, most of them are all fast-growing and hardy which have a lot of other uses (shade, mulch etc).
     
  9. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Could be worse, I have been cleaning from a storm for 3 days. It was a deep permaculture lesson. Lost 1 plum tree, & my chicken tractor. Luckily all the chickens lived.
     
  10. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Really keep an eye on Ingas up here , and chop as often as possible , otherwise that 1 tree will dominate your whole block .
     

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