Ask Geoff Lawton a question - Round 4

Discussion in 'Put Your Questions to the Experts!' started by CraigMackintosh, Jan 10, 2013.

  1. xsangiorgi

    xsangiorgi New Member

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    Dear Geoff and Graig,

    For a very long time I have wondered why on https://permacultureglobal.com/ it isn't possible to have badges and courses which are accredited by other well organized permaculture groups such as the Permaculture Association UK. Right now there is a clear cut between the PRI certified badges and courses which get a green color and the non PRI which are grey..

    I understand that you want to attest to a certain quality. At the same time having other organizations recognized by the PRI would make the website better represented by more people and organizations. Moreover having a place in your own bioregion would be more contextual and convenient for many who don’t have the means or time to get especially accredited by the PRI but do take their work as serious.

    Since you told me that permacultureglobal.com is a gift from PRI for all the Permaculture people I believe it would be of added value.

    Kind regards,

    Xavier San Giorgi
     
  2. robbob

    robbob Junior Member

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    How many times do you give the animals the Geoff Lawton Mineral Mix?
    thanks,
    Rob
     
  3. robbob

    robbob Junior Member

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    Hello Geoff,
    What is the best mobile fencing (cheap) for pasturing cows for rotational pasturing? Does the fence have to be electrified? How large should a pasture be for every 100 meat cows, per 10 dairy cows, and how many days should they be there? Do the hens go on with the cows or after them? Could ducks, geese, chickens, hens, guinean fowl, roosters, goats, meat and dairy cows pasture together? What would be the best system for pasturing the animals? There are at present 42 water bins for the cows drinking water.
    On the farm, there is only meat cows presently. The land isn't plowed, it has grasses that aren't seeded. I would like to put more elements into the pasture, with new plants introduced into the perennial pasture, create hedge-ways, put in other forage systems, create winter production, fruit/food/forage/lumber forests and so on. Any help is welcome. Any ideas?
    I want to introduce these other animals onto the farm. What do you think about donkeys on a farm? We might be on to the largest Permaculture philosophy farm in Spain, with endless avenues.
    The first project is to establish water architecture/structures, Swales, dams, ponds, lakes. The farm is a 500 hectare farm in Villacastin, Spain, mediterranean cool, 1200-1400m above sea level. It has one slope, the largest one, with a length of 3 km, faces north, another smaller one facing south and others facing in other directions. There is an open air mine which has a rock special for building high speed railways, currently halted production due to the spanish financial, state securities bond and housing market.
    I would love any help possible. I am at present trying to organise conversations with public officials on funding of many of the development costs involved. How much would consultancy from you be?
    Two pictures of the property, one of the topography and the other of the topography overlaid onto a google earth image of the property.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Thanks again and sorry about all the questions, Permaculture promotes questions.
    Rob
     
  4. eafinct

    eafinct New Member

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    Suggest you check out the Nobel Peace Prize winning work of Wangari Maathai, who started the Green Belt movement. Here is a link to her books:

    https://www.greenbeltmovement.org/wangari-maathai/books

    It's very inspirational, but to me the most valuable part of her work was her description in "Unbowed" of what the landscape was like before it was deforested.
     
  5. Matej

    Matej New Member

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    Dear Geoff,

    How do you make dam or pond, if the sub soil is only 40cm deep or less, than there is bedrock (granite for examle)? How do you seel that? How do you seel karst region (limestone) dams without plastic?

    On what degree of slope you still make dams and on what swales (erthworks)? What kind of bedrock is a problem in earthwork on steep slops, because of landslip posibilities?

    Best regards
    Matej
     
  6. robbob

    robbob Junior Member

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    Hello Geoff,
    I have put up other questions regarding a 500+ hectare meat cow farm in Villacastin, Spain. I have read Yeomans book The Keyline plan, which is very insightful. Should keyline plowing be the first thing I should do on the farm? This is my take. The farm has a huge ridge, the top being 1450m and going to 1300 in 550m, then grating off to 1250 in another 600m. Two images of the topography are available at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    My idea is to put in keyline dams and swales. Should I put swales on the keyline? Is that a good place for the to be? I will put more swales throughout, but is a keyline a good placement for swales, along with keyline dams?
    Where is a good placement for the forests? From the course I would say on the steep slope above the keyline as well as below, along with contour (right?) forests lines though out. The thing is the largest most extensive slope is north to south falling, north facing, in the northern hemisphere (not too desirable) although I do have some south facing smaller slopes around the property. (actually might be the perfect place for the future eco house, main residence) The main residence now is a Granite house (uuu).
    Thanks,
    Rob
     
  7. LLLC

    LLLC New Member

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    Hi Geoff, thanks to you and Craig for providing this great opportunity!

    Once a property is well drought-proofed, as is yours, is it then more vulnerable to flooding? I doubt yours would be, but what would happen to Zaytuna Farm if there was an extreme rain 'event' that went on for a long time? What measures are in place to prevent flooding in general, and flooding of the house in particular?

    Thanks :)
     
  8. andrews

    andrews New Member

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    Re the valve that automatically controls watering in the propagation greenhouse, mentioned 23-24 min into the tour video: This would be very useful in my own setup, and I imagine in others' as well. If it is something you bought, what's the model number, manufacturer's name, etc.? If it is something you made, could you provide a drawing, photographs, do-it-yourself instructions, etc. so that I can make my own?

    Many thanks,
    Andrew
     
  9. CraigMackintosh

    CraigMackintosh *****

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    Hi All. Here are the answers to the first five questions in Round 4. Geoff was called away in the middle, so I'll follow up with another video when we can coordinate it. Thanks for your patience all.

    [video=youtube;W5SvtpkiSO8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5SvtpkiSO8[/video]​
     
  10. CraigMackintosh

    CraigMackintosh *****

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    Hi All. Here are the answers to the remaining questions for Round 4. Please note that due to a technical glitch with the software used to record this conversation, the video is inexplicably missing!

    Update: For those who want just the sound file, you can play and/or download the podcast here.

    [video=youtube;ASYbgw_EaVg]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASYbgw_EaVg[/video]​
     
  11. chook-in-eire

    chook-in-eire Junior Member

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    @Synergy
    You may want to look at Eucryphia cordifolia which hails from the Valdivian temperate rainforest in SW Chile in a similar climate to the temperate rainforest of BC.
    Ulmo honey seems to be similar to Manuka honey in its properties. See https://www.duerrs.co.uk/2011/08/duerr’s-launches-ulmo-‘healthy-honey’-in-the-uk/


    Another interesting "honey plant" from the same region and family (Cunoniaceae) is Weinmannia trichosperma.
    Those two are top of my wishlist now. Looking for a supplier as we speak ...

    @Geoff & Craig: Thanks for another great Q&A session! You guys are tops!
     
  12. CraigMackintosh

    CraigMackintosh *****

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    Hi Everyone. Please note that after I've posted the responses to questions in a particular thread, then that thread is effectively closed to more questions. Other questions need to be posted in subsequent rounds. I've left the threads open after putting up the responses from Geoff, only so that people can discuss the questions and answers between themselves, but not so more questions can be posted. If people prefer, for clarity, I can actually close/lock the threads after posting the responses, but until now I thought people would prefer to have the option to discuss further amongst themselves...

    In case you missed it, at top of all these 'Ask an Expert' threads, I had already put: "Each thread will begin with questions, and end with the resulting video with answers."
     
  13. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    hmmm, maybe lock the thread, and then when the podcast/video is available, open a new 'follow-up' one (with clear instructions that it's not for questions, and a link to the new questions thread)? More work for you though sorry Craig. Or allow members, or moderators, to open threads in this forum?
     
  14. Spidermonkey

    Spidermonkey Junior Member

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    Stocking Rates and Land Carrying Capacity

    Hi Geoff,

    Could you please tell me how you calculate the carrying capacity of a given area of land for the various animals on your farm, and how you plan their rotation between pastures?

    Do you have a system or formula or is it based on judgement and observation?

    What are the factors that must be considered?

    I know there are systems out there that work on animal weight / area X time in pasture.
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Hi Spider monkey - you might want to read Craig's post a few posts back and then repost your question. It'll get lost here.
     
  16. Nigel Richards

    Nigel Richards Junior Member

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    My sincere apologies if I'm jumping in on Geoff's question, Spidermonkey.
    I just thought a few comments may assist.

    This really is a classic example of the 'depends' answer heard so frequently in Permaculture.

    Simply put, there is no 'golden formula' or mathematical way of making realistic estimations re stock/acre. There are simply too many factors in question;
    fertility, livestock type, climate, land use - all vital issues.

    1 acre of well groomed 'food forest' might support more livestock than 5 acres of neglected, arid land

    A little jersey cow might just get away with happy chomping, while a 'big girl' will be nudging you for some extras.

    And remember; in Permaculture, we like mixing things successfully, we know that we can add chickens, some ducks, a few geese, a couple of goats and maybe even a pig or 2 to do some tractor work...all on this same acre, all happily co-existing without food competion...I think that's 2 tractors somewhere in there now!

    If you're new to livestock, have land of fairly average fertility and have a kind climate, my biggest advice would be to;
    start SMALL and enjoy developing a STOCKMAN'S eye.

    Grow with your system.

    One of the biggest causes of disappointment with livestock is diving in too deep before really having a sound appreciation of THEIR needs and YOUR ability to cater for them.

    Learn to observe - not just your livestock, watch closely whether your land is able to support them without becoming over grazed. If you do this carefully (small steps!), your land will steadily INCREASE in its capacity to grow more, better.

    And most importantly; ENJOY learning the ways of YOUR livestock, YOUR land, YOUR freedom!
     
  17. Matis

    Matis Junior Member

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    Well, my question is if there is going to be a online permaculture course for people younger than 18.
    And, if you'd live in a frostfree climate, would this be a good list of plants?
    Pigeon pea
    perennial cucumber
    Perennial peppers (hanabero, ají dulce etc)
    tree tomato
    Cherimoya Winged bean
    Pomegranates
    Figs
    Loquats
    Lemon guava
    fejioa
    runner bean
    dates
    avocado
    air potato
    Chinese yam
    sweet potato
    lychee
    jackfruit
    macadamia
    carob
    longan
    taro
    Mango
    Ackee fruit
    papaya
    Chayote
    peach palm
    avocado
    banana
    plantains
    Ice cream bean
    Sago Palm
    Maya nut
    Chaya
    Moringa
    Pongamia Pinnata
    Amaranth
    Brazil Nut
    Passion fruit
    Coconut
    Sugar Palm
    Sugar Cane
    bamboo
    Jicama
    Acacia victoriae
    Pineapple
    Mangosteen
    Cocoa (cacao)
    Chipilin
    Vanille
    cow tree B. utile
    chia
    Oyster Nut Telfairia pedata
    Pequi Caryocar brasiliens
    water chestnut
    safau, “Africado
    dragon fruit
     
  18. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Matis you are unlikely to get an answer to this post. See Craig's comments above. You should repost in the latent questions area.
     
  19. tsatsahouse

    tsatsahouse Junior Member

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    Hi ,


    we live in Indonesia in Bali,
    we start a natural sustainable place on 3 hectares land one year ago
    in the mountains at 1100 m high,
    hot day 25 to 30 degrees and fresh nights 13 to 15 degrees
    We have a five to six months of rainy season and even dry season there are lot of humid early morning but day time is very dry.


    we have a lot of bamboo (clumping) , guava, indian coral tees ,
    few avocado, citrus, coffee, on the land.( before we came here)
    but there are lot of like moulding leaves , black spot , every tree not looks healthy.
    Before we came elephant grass was overgrowing everywhere,
    we just clear half of the land from it...




    Around our area everybody grows Citrus orange because it is cash crops, and they use pesticide fungicide...
    before we come here local people cut most of the trees for construction and fire.
    We start some reforestation and plant more trees ,
    plus make some gardens to grow vegetables but same problem begins to occurs,
    not really healthy...

    can you help us to find a solution please,
    thanks.

    Xavier & Soyoko
     

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