Asian Winged Bean Question

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by sindhooram, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    hello, I am creating a new permaculturish garden in south India and was surfing a little on net to see what new seeds I could order suitable for my growing conditions.
    I came across this Asian Winged bean and it sounds interesting because you can supposedly eat the leaves, flowers, tubers and beans and the beans are protein high like soyabeans. the plant is also meant to be a great nitrogen fixer and can be a perennial if winters aren't too cold. So thinking that sounds great I was all ready to order some seeds, until I looked at the photo of the plant and it seems like it may be the same as a bean which I got the seeds of recently in a local nursery.

    here seeds aren't labelled and the staff only know the local name. so I have no idea what kind of bean it was I bought. It is a reddish brown colour, quite large and fat, and round, and the part where the sprout would come is white.I have never seen that kind of bean before and don't know what the pods are like. Does anyone know if that sounds like an Asian wing bean seed?I dont want to order seeds from the US if I can get them locally for 5 rupees!! I have tried surfing net to see what the asian winged bean seed is like but no luck.I have also asked some locals who have no idea.

    Recently I planted 3 types of bean seeds - most of them aren't doing well as I think they got a nematode problem. But the type I just mentioned is growing like Jack and the Giant Bean stalk. It is already shooting up the cables I put for the beans to grow up and if it was a perennial and continued to grow like that you would only want a couple of plants.
    If anyone has any experience of this plant or can tell me what the bean I planted may be if not Asian winged I would be really grateful!!
     
  2. Hamishmac

    Hamishmac Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    If the seed is in the 2-3cm ~1 inch long ball park, and really is behaving like a triffid on steroids, try googling or wikipedifying (?)

    canavalia gladiata or sword bean

    If however a bit smaller and flattish a search for

    Phaseolus lunatus or Lima Bean/ butter bean may help. The images of Lima beans are a bit confusing as there are dozens of varieties eg Christmas Pole Lima Bean/ Zebra striped bean/ madagascar bean, with various coloured seeds.

    Both can behave as flourish/ dieback heavy cropping beans in the sub-tropics.

    If on the other hand it is a more regular bean size, say 7-10mm, can't help you mate, though pics might help.

    I've got sword & lima bean growing well here in summer, though when I tried had no success with Asian winged bean.

    Could send you some seeds to try if the powers that be allow it.

    Happy India National Day for Monday just gone.

    Hamish
     
  3. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    hello, thanks for the reply. The photos I've seen on net now of those beans you mentioned dont seem like my bean seed because of the white bit where the sprout comes, although they also sound interesting to grow.
    I have put here a photo of my seed - I hope it works as I had a bit of trouble getting it to the correct size to upload here.
    What did the Asian winged bean seeds you tried with look like? Did it not grow well because of climate of poor germination?
    The bean size in the photo is about 1cm x 7mm.

    Thanks also for the offer to send seeds - I 'm going on holiday soon but after would love to see if that was possible... - I 'd be perfectally happy to do so the other way round too if the customs in Australia allowed it.
    I'll keep posting my progress.IMG_2616.jpg[/attachment:1mo8ny6b]
     
  4. Hamishmac

    Hamishmac Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Aha!

    Could it be lablab?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lablab

    I've just sown it 3-4 weeks ago, and 1 metre high now.

    My Asian winged bean didn't take off when I tried 4 years ago because poor soil, little rain, heavy shade, wrong time of year. All before I discovered permaculture.

    Hamish
     
  5. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Hello - yes I think you are right - it looks like that Lablab - sounds like an interesting bean too but the only concern I have is that it is described as being toxic when it is old. How can I know the point when it is getting toxic?
    I think I will try the winged bean too - will post how it goes.

    best wishes
     
  6. Hamishmac

    Hamishmac Junior Member

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    Lablab toxicity/ Asian Winged Bean Question

    Sindhooram,

    I'm not sure, but lets throw that one open to the forum to answer.

    Also, some more links for you:

    https://www.moodindico.com/index.php?token=story&id=116

    tells how lablab gave Bangalore it's name.

    https://www.floridata.com/ref/D/doli_lab.cfm

    https://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11763&page=190

    https://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Lablab+purpureus

    give lots of detail on lablab, and warn that the dried seed contains some toxins, which are denatured by boiling. Cassava/manioc has the same type of toxin and many countries use that as their principle starch staple, so I'm sure it is a manageable issue.

    Hamish
     
  7. japhy

    japhy Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Based on Toensmeier's book 'Perennial Vegetables' which I've just invested in (awesome!) it's not lab lab but psophocarpus tetragonobulus, also called Goan bean, asbin, ku-bemya. I'm tempted to get some myself - apparently they're among the world's best nitrogen fixers, and the pods, beans, young leaves and shoots, flowers and flowerbuds, and tuberous roots, are all edible!
     
  8. Hamishmac

    Hamishmac Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Good pickup Japhy,

    although I planted some Asparagus Pea (from Erica Vale seeds, Brisbane) aka tetragonolobus purpures, and the seeds were much smaller than lab-lab. Still not germinated yet, so can't tell you the plant morphology. I don't know if this is another cultivar of psophocarpus tetragonobulus or not tho'

    Hamish
     
  9. kanintalagaeh

    kanintalagaeh Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Yes it's called bataw (https://www.stuartxchange.com/Bataw.html) here. I'm not sure if the old ones are toxic... But we don't eat those. The young ones are good sliced up when soft.
     
  10. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Hi,

    Not wanting to add confusion as without latin names it can be hard to define which legume is which. I believe the asian winged vegetable may be called the New Guinea Bean here in Australia. We also have available here the much smaller Yam Bean. The Yam Bean produces big pods but half the size of the New Guinea Bean. I have grown both. Not being categorical here but in my situation [dry tropics] the Yam Bean produces a bigger Yam which was round, the NG Bean produced a longer root more Daikon shaped, ie, long and cylindrical.

    I only ever produced the NG bean for one season and then mainly because it was one of the first unusual vegetables I grew. The Yam Bean is a better bet for me and it also looks better with lovely flowers so it is in my 'house garden' along with a chilli, eggplant, herbs etc and not grown in the vegie garden. I also use a very light green leafed sweet potato as a ground cover.

    cheers,
     
  11. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Hello - does anyone know how long the lab lab bean (if that's what it is) should take to flower and produce beans? Mine has been going now for 3 1/2 months and the vine is really big but no sign of any flowers.
    Thank you!!!
     
  12. keithtel

    keithtel New Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Sindhu,

    Did you finally identify the beans ? Did they turn out to be winged beans ? I am also in India and are looking for a few of these to try growing them. Where did you purchase them? Was wondering if I could order a few to be sent to me by mail ?

    Thanks
     
  13. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Hi, thanks for the post...the bean wasn't an asian wing bean . I think as Hamishmac said it is lablab. I don't know yet if I can recommend growing lablab...the bean vine is really big but after 4 months still no flowers - maybe they will come with the rainy season. I am pruning it a bit and using that as mulch. The roots are really big but when i looked under the soil I didn't see any sign of nitrogen fixing nodules although I didnt check extensively.

    But yes I did get some Aisan wing bean seeds as I want to try them. I ordered them from a place called Bakers Creek Heirloom seeds and they do international shipping but sometimes they're sold out. I think if you google for asian wing bean seeds you'll come up with more places.
    I'm going to plant mine in a few weeks time I think - I may have some spare seeds after that if you don't find any as I think I only need two or three plants - you can conact me.

    Where are you based in India by the way? are you doing permaculture?
     
  14. Jasper

    Jasper New Member

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    Re: Asian Winged Bean Question

    Hi Hamish,

    I have been searching the web for Sword bean seeds and saw the below. It would be much appreciated if you could advise where I could obtain a few of these?

    We used to grow them many years ago in Nth Qld and I would like to grow some again.

    thanks

    Colin


     
  15. Yukkuri_Kame

    Yukkuri_Kame Junior Member

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    A guy at a "green expo" gave me a dried asian winged bean last winter, telling me it was Jack-and-the-beanstalk material. I planted 2 seeds, one survived. It took over 7 months to flower, waiting for the fall equinox here in sub-tropical Florida. Lovely delicate purple-blue blossoms. Now the beans are starting to come in heavily. The plant is monstrous - covered a small neglected orange tree and now is jumping to a nearby palm, as well as reaching out in all directions. The beans are very tasty, and soft even at 8-10 inches. Non-descript green bean flavor. So far I have only eaten them steamed.

    I am curious what will happen this winter. How long will it keep flowing and producing? At this point it keeps putting out more vines, blossoms and beans. Here we rarely get more than a mild frost once a year, so it should survive just fine.

    Most of my Japanese friends have never heard of it, though there is a word for it in Japanese "shikaku mame" meaning "four-angled bean", an apt description of the shape. One Japanese friend had eaten (tempura fried!) on a remote Japanese-territorial island off towards Guam. She also suggested sauteed with garlic, ginger and Chinese black bean sauce.... mmm....
     

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