"Are any of you realy serious about change"?

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by joel case, Jul 24, 2007.

?

"Are any of you realy serious about change"?

  1. yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. no

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. joel case

    joel case New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    How many of you have faith in permaculture? We must start first by bringing permaculture to those who need it the most, the impoverished. We must reach out to them by creating a permaculture colony in a poor country. We will make projects, mostly from scratch using almost nothing but local resources and what people already have. we will suffer with the starving. we will eat when they eat. we will sleep when they sleep. The labor will be hard and rewarding. a relationship will be built with this village or tribe. Windmills will be erected, humanure composting will be practiced, gardens and homes will be constructed side by side, languages will be exchanged, and knowledge will be shared. No one can do this alone. It will take a group of dedicated cooperative people, with many different skills to set this in motion.

    Keep the spirit alive![/quote]
     
  2. castanea

    castanea Guest

    sharing permaculture

    There are poor here too, in my own country. Change doesn't have to be hard.
    We are using a friend's truck to haul our wood home for the winter. He wants fruit trees. I have started him some, and it's pretty easy...you can start some too without a visit to the garden centres. Buy or beg a handfull of ripe cherries. Spit the seeds into a jar a third full of good soil before they dry up. Shake the jar to coat them and put them in the fridge. They will sprout right in the fridge and you can pot them as soon as the root (first sprout) is about a half inch long. They will grow on a window sill in a milk jug with a few holes in the bottom till it is warm enough to put them out. Many seedlings make very good cherries. I'm in Canada, so I plant seeds from Stella and Bing cherries. If you live somewhere else, try seeds from YOUR local cherries.

    Same thing with apples...I have a lovely tree my kid planted when she was three. It is a huge tree now, with hard, sweet, crisp apples that don't take scab or rust.

    Maybe you would rather plums? Same thing...eat the plums, spit the still moist seeds into a jar a third full of good soil, lid it and shake, pop in fridge..when they sprout, pot them up and grow them in the house till it's warm out. It really IS that easy. We live in a consumption driven society, so garden centres exist and folks are lead to believe only the pros can grow stuff. One further thing with plums, most of the oval blue plums are self fruitfull, meaning you only need one tree. Most of the round red or yellow plums are NOT self fruitfull and you'll need two. The round ones are Japanese or hybrids...and here, in Canada, the local wild plum can make fruit with the Japanese or hybrids. By all means, gather seed from the local ones and plant a few next to the tame ones...some of the cross breds are a lot of fun..banana shaped red plums, very late round red plums, two months past the rest...spreads out the season....go play, it's fun :)
     
  3. TCLynx

    TCLynx Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I agree about there being poor people right in the middle of all the modern culture. I'm in America. Central Florida to be exact.
    castanea
    The info about the fruit trees sounds wonderful but it might not work quite the same in all climates. Many of the fruit you mentioned require a certain number of chilling days per year in order to produce fruit which is why apples and cherries are wonderful up North where I grew up in Michigan. But, there are many other fruits that can be grown here and not up north. Citrus for example. Might not be as successful from seed but if you know some one with a Myer lemon, beg to take a cutting. Most other citrus you could plant the seeds to grow your own root stock and then practice grafting cuttings from trees you know produce good fruit.

    Trees aside. I was on a totally different forum where some one was complaining how this society keeps all the food locked up. As if they should be allowed to just take anything from anyone anywhere for free. I was very annoyed with them since they thought they should be allowed to take but were unwilling to do the work to grow some of their own food. They were trying to make it sound like all the food was just growing on the shelves in the stores and some big land barron went and put locks on the doors to it.

    I recomended to them to grow some of their own food and they went on to whine that they can't afford fertilizer. And they can't afford potting soil. Arg! (of course they can't afford it because they are on welfare because they are unwilling to work-not unable mind you.) If I managed to grow lettuce and cucumbers on my shady patio at my apartment, then I figure just about anybody could grow something so long as their dwelling has a window. As to the potting soil and fertilizer, they probably didn't like my suggestions seeing as I was humanure composting right on that little 9' by 9' patio.

    I'm planning to do what I can to change things by simply starting with myself.
     
  4. kathleenmc

    kathleenmc Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    :D Hey there Joel....

    Permaculture principles are happening everywhere around the world and have been doing so for the last thirty years. There are millions of people from all walks of life who have had the chance to witness, participate and practice permaculture since it's inception. Bill and David have helped to educate so many people and most of those have gone onto educate even more( a wonderful permieball effect). There are projects and workshops happening constantly all over the world (rich and poor alike).

    Community based projects work for me as it brings in all facets of people from all 'classes'. Working together and sharing in the principles of permie life. It's amazing what a community garden can do for a small town or suburb. Then there are school projects (called living classrooms) which teach children, from many backgrounds, how to do the nutrition garden/biodiversity thing......

    Go for it I say.....

    Kathleen
     
  5. Honeychrome

    Honeychrome Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    apples

    Then you were extremely lucky with the apple seed you planted! Growing apple trees from seed isn't like growing stone fruit from pits. Each apple seed is genetically different- the five seeds you get from a single apple will each produce a different and unique kind of tree. All of the well-known apple varieties are a result of grafts, tracing their roots (ha ha...a pun, and technically inaccurate!) back to an individual tree. Old-fashioned genetic engineering if you will. 99% of the time if you grow a tree from an apple seed you get crappy apples. In the early US, to stake a legal claim to a land grant, a settler had to plant something like 40 apple trees (a demonstration that they intended to stay on the land and weren't just speculating)- having one of those trees produce a desirable eating apple was like striking gold. The vast majority of those early orchards were for hard cider production (crappy apples can still get you drunk!). There is a fascinating section in Michael Pollan's Botany of Desire on apples- I recommend the whole book, but particularly that section.
     

Share This Page

-->