Araucaria's habitat.

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by Curramore1, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nice bit of journalism. I have seen Dianne at the markets (Big Pineapple on a Saturday is my local food market) and buy stuff from her stall regularly. Before I went dairy free Maleny Dairy yoghurt and milk used to be a feature at home too. I always spread the love and buy a little bit from each of my favourite 5 sellers so everyone gets some gold coins in their pocket.

    The wild dog issue is horrible. I don't know what I would do if it was me. I'm such a poor shot I'd hit the neighbours cow rather than the wild dog….
     
  2. Terra

    Terra Moderator

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Feeling your frustration and pain , upside is you have the skills to deal with what has to be done many wouldn't have that . Wild dogs would be dreadful we only have foxes here and can shoot and bait , at least animals like big cats kill what they eat bloo%y foxes ect eat creatures alive with out going into detail , with what ive seen im not ashamed to bait the horrid things .
     
  3. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Thankyou for your comments S.O.P., Eco and Terra. I am indeed a dinosaur. I hadn't considered that I was venting, but in hindsight I do sound like an old whinger, how embarrassing, but thankyou for reading. The modernfarmer article, an interesting snapshot of some farms S.O.P. A rather grey and jaded sepia wash only depicting a depressed view of current hinterland farms. Most farms are just idling over until the real estate value climbs enough and the owners are ready to move into Dunrootin, Dunmoovin or Dunnowhattodo retirement home. The local government won't allow them to cut off any small blocks so they sell the lot. My wife and I are both 4th generation Sunshine Coast farming families, my Grandmother was born here in the 1880's and we still farm the same land albeit very differently from our forbears. I can see a future in greater diversification of enterprise, embracing local tourism combined with increased boutique locovorian, lower food-miled foods in this locale. This land owns us and we do our best to live with and in it and make its use sustainable.
    The potential of this climate and soil for food production is immense, the difficulty is in cleanly, cheaply and ethically replacing the nutrients lost in outputs in produce and losses such as high rainfall leaching and the surface runoff of organic matter in storm events. Where do the local governments put all the nutrients that they remove from the local sewerage system? Water security and growing dryland crops and more efficient crop water use instead of regular surface irrigation. Growing plants without the loss of soil cover and soil structure and macro and microbial populations while maintaining high soil organic matter levels is challenging. To incorporate and adapt the principles of permaculture into a traditional based enterprise is the key. Smaller, more integrated and interconnected use of the land resource. Give me another couple of decades and we'll see what happened. We don't graze much of our land by choice, there is no money in it unless you graze 500 head, just to keep the weeds down and the eye appeal good. The green hills have a powerful appeal. Interesting that the hectares of trees that I planted for timber use 35 years ago on my less arable and steeper land are now mostly designated riparian zone, wildlife corridor, designated view etc. and the resource is now ready to harvest. They were to be part of my superannuation back then. Sometimes it doesn't pay to be proactive. I thought that I was pretty groovy baby back then and most farmers chucked off at these young upstarts planting trees where they had just finished getting rid of them and building cheap stone and mud brick, straw and pole framed houses in the bush complete with a spinning wheel a home brew kit with a thunderbox dunny and a vege patch out the back.

    We have always been largely personally self sufficient, but you need to earn cash to pay for the infrastructure maintenance, council rates, Government fees and levies, commissions, taxation, energy, transport, irrigation water fees, fertilizers organic or otherwise and macro and micronutrients. I wonder how many permies would be able to pay for all their water from the sale of their produce like farmers have to. We collect the water on our land and pay for the storage facility and reticulation, yet have to bid to win for the right to use it and pay hard cash for whatever you are allocated. Imagine if you were asked to pay for all the water that you collected from your roof and stored in your rainwater tanks! and only after you won and paid for the right in an open auction as well.

    Our culture does not value food producers at all, so lets just have them die off by natural attrition, takeaways are so convenient and in your face. You can get all your needs from another sweatshop country cheaper at Woollies or Aldi, just don't read the labels or the fine print. After all, milk, orange juice and eggs come from cartons, veges from styro boxes, bacon and fish fom the deli and meat from the glad wrapped styro flat packs in cold section of the supermarket. Bread and wheat pasta is full of gluten so buy some rice crackers or corn chips instead. I should have become morbidly obese, alcoholic, a chain smoker, prescription painkiller addicted, that is, after producing three or four kids with a few different partners and enjoy some well deserved unemployment rest and rental assistance, free health and even some spending money to boot, they'll possibly even deliver the food and grog to me and in the end pay for my cremation. To think what I have missed out on.
    A good couple of days of steady, warm rain and the smell of quenched earth will swing me round I'm sure.
     
  4. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    [​IMG]

    Forecast for this weekend. Happy times ahead, except for the runoff.
     
  5. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    38mm of rain last weekend. Light rain here at present and a pea soup fog up here on the mountain. Mushrooms are out today ( the pink-gilled edible non-hallucinogenic type of course) just picked a 20L bucket full and in the process of making butter fried mushies on toast. How decadent! Rainy days have been very rare these past months, so a day in the office doing paperwork and dreaming and scheming.
    Just paid the rates, shitty about paying for public transport levy when I don't have any, the heritage levy when I am a walking, talking, local dinosaur whose grandma was the first white person born in the district, the environment levy which I see as a direct slap in the face for all my work helping to improve the local natural and built environment and volunteer work in Landcare, Greencorp etc. Blah blah.
    Trying to get my head around the whole off grid electricity option to see if that is the way to go, no action plan as yet, but plenty of ideas.
    Planting out globe artichoke, snake bean, coriander, celery, mizuna, parsley, lettuce, wom bok, senposai, and spring onion seedlings after lunch today and laying in some sweet potato, cassava, jerusalem artichoke, turmeric, ginger and yacon tubers in random sweet spots around the place. I hope I remember where I put them all. 12 degrees centigrade outside, cool, damp and good weather for a fire in the combustion heater to dry out some washing. The jasmine is in flower, so are all the citrus, stonefruit, broad beans, jonquils and iris, saffron crocus are in bud swell, vanilla vines are starting to flower too, so have been hand pollinating them each morning. The fig trees leaf buds are swelling and the first asparagus shoots are emerging.
    Cabbages everywhere, red ones, sugarloafs and wrinkly green ones. Has anyone got a good sauerkraut recipe as I don't mind it on occasion on the odd hot dog or german sausage?
    May this unusual early spring rain continue. Normally it stays dry and warms up gradually here until the October 3 O'clock hail and wind storms which lead into the Christmas-February steady rainy season. This pattern of a little late winter-early spring rain with a dry late spring until mid-summer period followed by a patchy late summer sort of wet season is a worrying trend here. Groundwater reserves are getting lower with the regional water table many metres below normal, springs have dried up where they have been flowing well for over 50 years of my life. Looks like we plan for more erratic rainfall and less of it for a while yet. Many of the ancient trees in my wet schlerophyll and sub-tropical vine scrub country are dropping dead leaves and limbs and turning up their toes as they are so shallow rooted and grow on stony, shallow ground. The understory is usually impenetrable has all shrivelled and you can see 50m into the forest now, I hope that it can regenerate. Another series of dry summers like we have had will forever change them I think.
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    You may know I work as an arborist, and let's talk about dead, dying, sick Euc removals. In particular, I've spent the last couple of months deadwooding Eucalypts by using a throwbag in high-traffic areas. To anyone else reading, throwing a beanbag up into a tree to hook dead limbs with a string isn't the most satisfying work. Problem is, it's worrying as this may be the beginning of something that we don't won't to imagine is happening. That said, if we are moving into the heavy carbon period that may have preceded us, I do believe the Hoops and Bunyas will still be kicking along. Yet to see any sick ones. Some good fires will finish off some areas as we know it unfortunately.

    Met an ex-CSIRO scientist the other day who studied tropical forages such as Albizia and Leucaena and that was interesting. After a google, I came up with this article of his that you may enjoy reading.

    https://www.qnc.org.au/CT_White/HTML/Lowry 1997.htm
     
  7. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Yes, S.O.P, I have read this previously and have many albizia lebbeck copses and several different species and cultivars of Leucaena. Back in the dim, dark ages of the early 80's after graduating I was employed as an an ecologist working with mine site rehabilitation, soil conservation and plant breeding. Much work was being done then by only a handful of geeks in this field. I recall that most of my lecturers in this area were from the US, Canada, Scotland, Britain and South Africa and being nonplussed that we Queensland born plebs were passed over and deemed very parochial in comparison. The botanist Bailey mentioned in the article was one of my paternal Grandmother's brothers.
    On the hoops and bunyas, they can't handle a fire either and many here in the end die due to insect borer attack after being weakened by a close fire and/or dry weather. I have collected seed and propagated and planted on my country over the past 40 years from the most ancient, original of all local Araucaria species I can find as remnants as well as some from near the Bunya Mountains which I planted in the 80's in Nambour on a family property in Perwillowen and some from towards Jimna on a property in the Conondale Valley. My GGrandfather left some remnant hoops on his property in Conondale, still in family hands since the 1880's with the trees still alive, but not being allowed to spread because of grazing and other ideals. When I see my distant cousins which own this farm now I harp on the genetic value of those old silky oak and hoop trees. We don't get many fires here, maybe once in 50 years, but because of the fuel build up they are usually very hot. We are lucky to have a wet gorge separating most of the National Park from us which is lit up every few years and I am vigilant with firebreaks and fuel reduction burning around the borders of my country. I sometimes burn grassland bordering Euc. forest to germinate seed and regenerate more local Eucs. on less arable land, then just thin them in a few years when they are 25 or so metres tall to 400 or so per Hectare. When I worked as a sawmill faller, general dogsbody saw doctor learner etc. and tail out hand for a time in the 90's at Bellthorpe I was amazed at the short 15 year harvesting cycle of the salignas in that area. The owners cut a small area, leaving the tree heads behind and in the dry autumn fired them. In a few short months the area was thick with new seedlings to restart the cycle. That family had been doing that on that small 100 hectare piece of land for over 100 years, providing income for two families and several workers families. True sustainability lost through Green, roughshod beaurocracy treating all cases the same, what a crying shame. Can't see the woods for the trees.
    I am tempted to remove dead limbs on some Euc's here but don't as they are where zillions of rainbow lorikeets and scaley breasted parrots breed every spring, particularly in the huge E.saligna trees and some in the E. microcorys trees. Just don't park your car or camp under one. In public places I reckon they should be pruned at ground level and a more suitable species planted in their stead.
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Messages:
    1,456
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I was talking more urban areas, than forest. I can understand that a lot of species die, particularly in fire, but urban Eucs are dying at a solid rate and I'm not including those damaged by modern practices which are more obvious. That said, urban areas are broken through the speed in which they remove water so I'm not surprised things die. Hoops, Bunyas, Kauris are fast becoming my favourite trees as they always impose on their urban surroundings and rarely falter, perhaps the ones that succumb are the trees in maintenance, not actively growing.

    Just so you know, we never remove a hollow limb. Even a bureaucracy can see the value in a hollow unless absolutely necessary.

    If you ever get around to propagating some of your better stock through whatever connection you can manage, I'll gladly continue them on in the Mary. You can teach me your ways and I'll attempt to do it for you if you wish.
     
  9. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    View attachment 2688 View attachment 2687 Hello S.O.P, I am no Guru, just been around a while and pretty simple to boot, as is my existence. Picked mushies in the drizzle this morning at Conondale with my partner. Attached pic. if it works, going to make some mushroom, beef and wine pies; mushroom soup and some mushroom sauce for Ron.
     
  10. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mmmmm sounds wonderful! How do your globe artichokes go? I have killed everyone I have tried to grow here before they get to maturity.

    Sauerkraut is dead easy. Thinly slice your cabbage. Add some dried herbs that take your fancy. Tiny pinch of salt. Then get your hands into it and squish and swish it around in the bowl until the juices start to come out. Put it in a crock if you own one, or jars if you don't. Leave in shady spot in the kitchen. If you have jars, 'burp' them twice a day to release the gas so they don't explode. When it tastes like sauerkraut transfer them to the fridge.
     
  11. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Globe artichokes thrive on neglect. I remember that you said that thistles don't grow where you are though for some reason. My pH is about 5.5-6.0 here and my soil is pretty acid as well. They grow to about 1.5 metres tall and put out suckers for about 2 years then die off.
    Going to have a lash at your sauerkraut tomorrow. Does it give you gas as bad as the raw cabbage in great quantities? May have to change over to methane burning rather than solar.
    Just about full up on mushrooms, might have to be a curry tomorrow.
     
  12. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Asparagus shoots emerging, so mulched with some oaten straw and sheep manure, purple ones are beating the greens. Planted zucchini seedlings and egg plants where I moved the mobile chook pen from. Cassava cuttings which I just stuck in the ground a month ago have their first leaves. Planted out another Hass avocado to replace one that died from root rot a few years back. Looking for a site for a poor Malabar chestnut-been growing through a pot for a year or two now. I think they grow 10 metres tall if you let them.
    Made some sauerkraut, thanks Eco for the advice.
    Coffee beans ready to harvest, way early this year. 3mm of rain in an afternoon storm, first thunder and lightning of the season. That is why I am inside early today.
    Making canvas waterproofer over a picnic stove downstairs from beeswax, raw linseed oil and mineral turps. Heat up 300g beeswax, add 50mL mineral turps and 400 mL raw linseed oil in a double boiler (or just in another pot inside a big one with hot water in it) then paint it on. I leave mine out in the sun during the middle of the day for it to soak in and repaint the seams again after a few hours in the sun. This is enough to do 2 large, full length coats. I scrub the outside with warm, soapy water and rinse to get the grime off first and then dry them in the sun before painting on the new waterproofer.
     
  13. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Political neglect just sums me up. Neglected and thinkin' I'm political, what day is it?
     
  14. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Planting, planting.... Gold tree tomatoes that I grafted onto a weed! Yes, bloody Devil's fig is great for grafting tamarillo buds onto except for the prickles. They must be close rellies, going to try it with eggplant and pepino next. Planted out into the orchard today, growing gangbusters in the pot. Beautiful spring weather here, warm and gentle breezes, still 10 degrees cool at night though, 23 during the day. Soil temp 16 degrees, still too cool to plant corn and pumpkins here yet. Clover in bud every where, just need some follow up rain to make it happen.
    Heifers calving all over, wild dogs on the prowl, 3 spotlighting patrols a night now, baiting program commences next week. Saw a wild red stag the day before yesterday, it had dropped it's old antlers and started a new velvet pair, early this year.
    Banana detrashing, desuckering and bunch bagging this afternoon and more sheep manure around the bases. Planting another wedge on the SE side in the outer plant circle around the house for vines on a series of chevron trellis to direct the prevailing SE wind toward the house windows and outdoor leisure area for the summer. I have choko, kiwi fruit male and female, dragon fruit, jasmine and a couple of briar roses for scent, wisteria, honeysuckle, Bower of Beauty, Hoya and some grape vines on the go once I have built the chevron trellis layout.
     
  15. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    s/e
    Location:
    South Waikato New ZeLeand
    Climate:
    Cool mountain
    Oh, its sounds wonderful.
    Are your Kiwifruit fruiting yet? I got the cocktail kiwi's but how many years later and they still havent even flowered!
     
  16. Benjy136

    Benjy136 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,104
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I waited six years for mine to flower and only got a couple dozen that year. Since then they have been producing a few bushels per year with three females and one male.
    Uncle Benny
     
  17. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Hello Uncle benny and Mischief, were your kiwi fruit grafted? They will bear much quicker if they are grafted, obviously Uncle benny's must be because they are known male and females. I have not seen a cocktail kiwi fruit yet.
    Mine are still potted babies just grafted. I have a few older vines which bear fruit, I think they were Hayward or similar in name. I did not know until recently that they were originally Chinese in origin.
     
  18. Benjy136

    Benjy136 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,104
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    One of mine is grown from seed while the others were bought at a nursery and were grafted. The flowers of male and female are different. I may have mentioned that mine don't ripen here until November.

    Love and good vibes,
    Uncle Benny
     
  19. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    New olive trees arrived today 2 of each variety for my climate zone. Will 10 trees be enough? Most are for fresh, brined olives, some are for oil. Westerly wind arrived again so will plant out in a week or so. Also bought a new fig variety, never heard of it before, a Red Conadria, a green fig with red insides. Only cost $10.00 so had to buy it. Will keep you posted on how it goes. Brown Turkey is the best performer and nicest so far over Black Genoa and white Adriatic. Boiled up a couple of new brews today to drink in the summer, an Aussie pale ale and a Blue Mountain lager, first brews with my own hops and home grown barley. New calendar season, new day, plant away. First cuttings of mulberry and figs are sprouting new leaves and roots after only a couple of weeks. Grafted some more tamarillo scions onto devil's figs rootstock, ran out of mastic so just used wax, let's see how it goes.
     
  20. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Uncle benny ours don't ripen until our autumn, late April, early May. They hang on the vine a long time and ripen slowly when you pick them.
     

Share This Page

-->