Araucaria's habitat.

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by Curramore1, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    You could try Cascade hops I have been growing them down on the coast.
     
  2. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Hi Permasculptor,

    thanks for your reply. Where do you get the propagation material? I love the floral smell of Cascade and the flavour finish it gives to the lighter brews, particularly wheat based ones. The North Americans got something right when they bred that one.
    I use a lot of Aussie "Pride of Ringwood", "Fuggles" and trad. UK "Goldings" as well. Where do they get their handles? If I accidently bred one I would have to call it something like "Blofield's Bungle" or "Sireline's Slip".
    Blowy wet weather here just a tonic, making home-made crumpets to have with my mid morning brew. (Coffee that is.) Although I did come across a mighty sounding stout recipe yesterday that required two tin of cherries, a bottle of chocolate topping and a cup of coffee beans in it's list of ingredients. Sounds like a Rocky road Irish Stout with the lot. Something to relish in front of the fire on a blustery westerly blasted night with a few select guests for a game of cards in late July maybe?
    Any other erstwhile brewers out there with secret and sacred recipes to share?
     
  3. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I think I got it off E bay.You are welcome to come and get a division if you are down Eumundi way.I did nearly kill it last time I divided it but it should fare better now it has been in the ground for a year.
    It is raining full on here now the creeks have started to run and the dam is finally filling - YAY!!!
    Hmm I must get a stout on.I don't have any exotic recipes for you I am too easily sated when it comes to beer, I am happy with the coopers brews
     
  4. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Thanks for your kind offer, I'll have a look at ebay first, don't want to cause the end of yours.
    Same same with the rain here, dams by-washing now, I'm glad that I insisted on more freeboard with the newest dam now, it's great to be wet again, have been walking around in a pair of old shorts, bare feet picking pink-gilled mushies for tea. Saw some crayfish heading out overland too, weird behaviour, but I suppose that's how they spread from place to place.
    My Grandma at Perwillowen near Nambour in the 60's used to send me out with a bucket after rain, she would check every one because once I slipped up and put a gold top or a blue meanie in the brew and you can imagine the consequences of that, Grandma being a 90 year old presbyt. matron. I sure learnt from that episode.

    Pan-fried in butter, served on toast with a side of bacon and onion. I must tell myself again that I have to wait until all members of the household return to share these goodies!

    Cooper's brews are great. My favourite is their Traditional Irish Stout, mixed with Terry O'Brien's stout fermentables from Morayfield Home brew shop. Leave for at least 8 weeks, just a great beer, similar in style to a well loved commercial Irish Stout.
     
  5. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    You are welcome bloke. You should do short videos on how to eat. As should we all .Id like to see the Granny episode!
    Ill have to go on a mushy hunt pink gilled you say.That would go well I have been assured (by my butcher) with kidneys as the best way to introduce kidneys or livers into ones diet .I see heaps of crays wandering around my neighbors block there is lots of holes in the ground I think they follow the sub surface water. Thanks for the heads up on the stout my better half is Irish so ill put it to use.
    I have to look after kids all week and give a talk at Nambour garden club with kids in tow on Wednesday oh and do a proper website and launch a world saving product and write letters to scientists re collaborations.
     
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You'll have that all knocked over by Friday lunchtime Permasculptor. The you can knock back a few stouts.
     
  7. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Mushrooms aplenty today, picked a whole 20L bucket full of the yummy, pink gilled variety. Mushrooms fried in butter, with a clove of purple garlic, finished with some cornflour and a dollop of cream plus a quick grind of black pepper. Nut brown ale drunk from a foaming tankard. Rib fillet steak from a 14 day chilled heifer carcass seared and eaten medium rare with mashed potato, steamed choko seeds, carrots in clover honey and char grilled pumpkin for tea. Wet and windy here in the hills from the tail of cyclone Ita.
    The past week was a doozy.... Monday- went head over turkey on the motorbike at 40 km/hr after sliding along disremembered poly pipe in wet grass, landed on arse with small rock the size of a fist in small of back just to adjust the attitude of my week...Tuesday- In geriatric, peripatetic mode breaking down carcass of elusive, mad heifer, marked never to be released due to murderous tendencies towards all life forms, especially humans, lucky to have the assistance of useful son and ever adaptable spouse, Wednesday- Mince and sausage making morning followed by brining and pumping corned meats, some truly remarkable sausage combinations- sage and garlic, tomato and onion, fennel and cumin, honey and soy, chilli and chives, beer and bacon. Thursday- Ripped out all old tomato plants, limed and added sheep manure and planted winter brassicas- cabbages, caulis, Kohl rabi, Brussels. Dug up 20 kg of new potatoes, harvested half a tonne of pumpkins and cut a bunch of lady fingers from the orchard, heavy rain on the way, black roiling skies, so mustered bullock paddock 15 km away and treated 100 head for cattle tick, finished an hour after dark. Friday- Mustered and drenched dry sheep, pulled off 30 or so daggy ewes and started to crutch but shore them fully instead as they were nearly full wool. Stopped after spouse (who is by the way on annual leave) to have a surprise brunch at 3.00 pm ( yep, got carried away again and forgot to get hungry) of fresh baked bread, corned beef with whole seeded mustard and a side of small, pickled onions and a pint of cold pale ale. I got the hint to cease and desist manual labours in my recuperative state when I finally straightened my tortured torso and crab walked in the direction of home. Saturday- Old man syndrome today, running just like a "Rolls Canardly" my Mother would say, pottered about cleaning and sorting stuff, sharpened all the knives, scissors, chainsaws, secateurs, hoes, spades, axes and brush hooks I could lay my hands on, changed the engine oil in a couple of Toyotas, a tractor and a couple of motorbikes, checked all the tyre pressures and washed windscreens. Sunday- Cajoled by long suffering spouse into finally getting X-ray of lower torso- a couple of floating ribs are now well and truly floating, off the spine that is, lucky I have been taking it easy this week too! Thought it was a bit painful rolling over in bed, put it down to being in Mid 50's and just get used to being older sort of thing. Raining Cats and Dogs out, fog blowing in the door and out the opposite window, wishing I had a good book to get my teeth into. Maybe a couple of good books, a movie and a game of cards, dream on.
     
  8. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ouch! Bet there's a lovely bruise on your back now… Your mum and my dad must have gone to school together. Except he calls is a Rolls and Barely. Rolls down hills and barely makes it up the other side. Enjoy the enforced rest.
     
  9. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    View attachment 2487

    This mornings breakfast mushrooms, still drizzly, windy and rainy up in the hills.
    Nice to see the runoff here so clear and not full of soil and good bits, the contour banks, silt traps and extra ground cover are working so far.
     
  10. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Thanks Eco,
    Taking it easy, been for a rainy wander about the place with the working dogs.
    Amazing sayings back then.....Our dirty children feet were called mundoeys, holey socks were called Prince Alberts;I remember seeing an actual road sign somewhere near Texas in SW Queensland for a district of Mundoey in my 20's; a potato was always a spud; Kumara or Kaukau or sweet potato was sweet butt. My boys are horrified that my Father cooked eggs and chops, sausages or rissoles with every breakfast in pure dripping with a side of thickly buttered toast with some Cocky's Joy ( Golden Syrup) and sweet, black tea after having consumed a big bowl of honey sweetened oatmeal porridge. My favourite was the dark brown gravy from the base of the cooled dripping crock on a slice of bread. My boys at first had no idea what dripping was, now we feed it to the dogs on stale bread. What a decadence!
    I can recall an older cousin returned from the Malaya conflict telling me that it was about time that he humped his bluey and went back to work like a kanaka for a Cane Cocky at Childers. Then I had no idea what he was on about.
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hen fruit and meat bags. (Egg and sausage.) The perfect way to start a day!
     
  12. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    What beautiful weather. A pity the forecast is wet and cold for the first May weekend in a few days. It seems strange not to have a long weekend for Labour day now. The Wood Expo is on in town this weekend, will probably go in for a gander to get some new ideas.
    Bottled up a pear cider and an India pale Ale today. Stocks are all full for the cooler weather ahead. Now to find a new hobby or interest for the longer nights ahead. Anyone read any good books lately?
    Planted some swede turnips and some radishes today, pulled the last of the sweet corn, snow peas are beginning to flower now. Dug up some horse radish to make relish with, some tap roots 200 mm long, such a deep rooted plant. I never replant it, it just sprouts again from the rootlets I leave when I dig it in the autumn. Macadamia nuts falling off the trees now, collect every second day to dry out, and so the rats don't get them. Citrus fruits are all beginning to sweeten, limes dropping all over the place, grapefruit ready to eat now. I relish fresh orange juice a couple of times a week in the autumn. Checked the bee hives and all Ok but will start to feed them back some of the frames of honey I set aside a month ago when the weather cools a bit more, bees overwinter badly here unless you take some of the honey off them and trap some of their pollen to feed back in winter, a bit like feeding hay you cut in the summer to cattle in the winter. I made some mead in the early summer from clover honey with some fresh apple and pear juice, but believe it or not it is not sweet, so I had to add some lactose and corn syrup to make it less dry, not a bad drop now with a big hunk of crusty bread and a lump of cheese with a few olives. Poor man's champagne indeed!
    The red deer stags are going off the roar in the bush now and I've seen a few stragglers along the creek flats from time to time grazing on the winter herbage. All shagged out from blueing and ready for a feed and a rest.
    Next week will be a muster of all beef breeder paddocks to draft off and wean the 8 month old calves at the home yards, might be time to go fishing for the first few days to get away from all the racket. The red claw are on the bite in the impoundments not far away, great with garlic butter, damper and a mug of crisp pale ale.
    Time for a camp. Cheerio.
     
  13. Steve Burgess

    Steve Burgess Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Sounds idyllic
    It is indeed a very beautiful time of year again in the Mary Valley. What a contrast to the blast furnace/drought conditions of only 6 weeks ago! A bit of frontal rain this weekend and it will really feel like autumn. (At last)
     
  14. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Yay! First ever Dragon Fruit!

    View attachment 2505

    Had this cactus looking weed from a friend about 5 years ago. I really doubted that it was a dragon fruit so quarantined it and voila... 5 years on it is actually the real deal. I feel guilty that I doubted my friend's description of such a gift. The other doovers there are Monstera deliciosa, the first harvest of the autumn too. I will wrap them in newspaper to ripen, they should be ready in 4-5 days, a pity they ripen from the top, so you can only eat about a third at a time or the nasty spicules will get you on the tongue and throat.

    Got a mega pot of pea, lentil and home-smoked ham soup bubbling away on the wood fire, first day that we have had it alight, waiting for the forecast westerlies due later tonight. Bring it on, I don't mind a cold snap to kill off all the greeblies and make the pumpkins harden up as long as it only stays a few days. Sheep just have the knack of delivering the first lambs of the season just as the filthy weather arrives, two arrived yesterday, tough little nuts.

    Off to bake a couple of loaves of fresh bread, took forever to rise today.
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    LOVE monstera - I must get a plant….
     
  16. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Hi Eco,

    easy to propagate, just break off a hunk and stick in the ground. Mine seem to like semi shade under a snakewood tree and a piccabeen palm. First fruit after 2 years, after 5 years there are currently about 50 fruit ready to eat over the next month. Come and get some if you wish. I read on the grapevine somewhere that you are relocating and downsizing, best wishes if that is the case. I sometimes come over to look over the Seasonal Antique and Collectables Fair at the Showgrounds, can bring some then if you wish.
    Steve.
     
  17. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I need to work out where I am going and whether I'll be gardening as yet I doubt monstera would be happy in a pot on a balcony! But thanks for the offer.
     
  18. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Hi Eco,
    Monsteras are the original potted indoor plant, they thrive inside or out, mine survived a couple of years pot bound on a verandah before I planted them out. If you do get one, make sure that you try the fruit from the mother plant as there is a huge variation in quality amongst vines locally here in my experience. Good luck with the changes in your life.
    Cheers, Steve.
     
  19. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well I never - those things get huge from memory. Will add it to the list of things to consider growing on a balcony.
     
  20. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Primary Producer
    Location:
    Curramore, Blackall Range, S E Queensland, Aust.
    Climate:
    Sub-tropical to temperate 2000mm rain, elevated 350-475m
    Balmy patch of weather 15 to 27 degrees range, Northerly winds, mare's tails in the sky over the past few days, showers around the corner I would guess. Local show this weekend, have entered heaps of stuff, wooden bowls, fruit and veges etc. Fresh snow peas today, yum, they usually don't even make it to the kitchen. A fresh crop of juicy jaboticaba, pepinos and another drop of macadamias. Sent a deck of yearling steers and barren heifers off to the store market for tomorrow's sale to further lighten the stocking load after such late rains this year, prices are still really crap, but the bills have to be paid and the grazing pressure lessened and as well the next batch of calves will be due in late July, so something's gotta give. Old cracker cows over 10 years old not joined to the bulls this year will go next when the market lifts a little, rates, land tax, income tax and end of financial year bills to be paid soon. Just when you imagine that you have earned a bit you realise that it was just a figment of your imagination and you are still actually just getting by.
    Off to the Gulf of Carpentaria for a fishing trip soon with old mates, been going now for a couple of decades, be good to catch up and forget about home for a couple of weeks and fill up on mud crabs and fish and the odd cool beverage. A luxury I can't really afford, but this might be my last, you never know do you? and you're dead for a long time.
    Both the boys will be home in a fortnight for uni holidays, both looking at me for some paid work, may have to build a new shed and clean out a dam or two. They get home, empty the fridge and cupboards of food and beers, sleep for a few days, then catch up with Grandmothers, cousins and mates, I might get a week or two out of them when they run out of fuel money.
    I planted an unknown envelope of seed I must have squirrelled away years ago, turns out they were fennel seeds, came up like hairs on a cat's back, so fennel overdose due soon.

    Interesting reading everybody's posts. I think I am content leading a much more shallow and simple life than many others here. Good luck and contentment to you all.

    Back to work.
     

Share This Page

-->