Anyone have a web site for wire knots?

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by ho-hum, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    If it is on the Net I can normally find it but I am stumped.

    Does anyone have a link for fencing wire knots? I can join wire and it does hold up. My oldest fences are 20 years old but they are a bit dogs' breakfast-ish.

    When I was younger I worked on a farm and the farmer had some great knots that he used. Alas, the farm is 25 years and 3000kms away.

    Cheers

    Mike
     
  2. earthbound

    earthbound Junior Member

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  3. derekh

    derekh Junior Member

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    I subscribe to Small Farms Magazine https://www.smallfarms.net and I find it ever so useful. The July 2005 edition had an article on knots and joins for wire fences. Back issues are also available for purchase $7.70

    See BTCV Handbooks Online is also useful: https://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/index

    And you could also see the DPI QLD bookshop for fencing books.

    cheers
    derek
     
  4. kja

    kja Junior Member

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    Hi Floot,

    I used to be a fencer, and have seen hundred of knot variations over the years. The figure eight is best when joining wire before straining. I would personally avoid the double loop especially on old High Tensile wire. The knot I use is a bit difficult to explain with out a bit of wire in my hand :lol: and I can't find any pics anywhere or recall any name ... so thats not much help to you. The Knot I used to use on hinge joint was one we used to call the "Gale Knot" after the bloke that we learned it off :lol: , again useless with out pics.

    If you are togging up old fences, Warratah makes a neat product call "Gripple" and they are indispensable on old brittle wires but can let go on high strain fences. A bit expensive at about $1.50 each too.

    You sound like you have done a bit of fencing anyway so just go with what you know works. I used to pride myself on my Knot neatness and smallness, but that just comes with tying 50 odd knots a day :).

    This page has a good pic of the tie off knot useed at the strainer post:

    https://www.foothill.net/~ringram/hitensle.htm

    A couple of years back I was going to write a book on fencing aimed at small landholders. Maybe I should have. Most *good* fencing, the sort that is built to last 25-30 years, is a dying knowledge bank, handed down from father to son. My own skills have been honed by three generations of practice, passed from father to son. My son will not continue the line as I can't make a living from it any more so... thats the end of that. Same goes for the other fencing families around here. Anyway thats not helping you find knots...

    Kim
     
  5. Guest

    KJ,
    Read that link and thought - wish I'd had this years ago. I remember our first fencing 'episode'.... simple 3 strand paddock separation installed by me, my two daughters and the wire in a wheelbarrow with a flat tyre, quite often going BOING, with the three of us going AAHHH!

    Far out - Spinning Jenny, huh? I note - they call for a straight jacket as part of required materials, with very good reason!

    Have printed it out, and stored the word fencer next to your name in my head. You have no idea how many times I have thought...wish I Knew someone who actually knows how to do this!

    Floot - Dogs Breakfast? Am very familiar with that. Goal is to keep them in/out and as long as it does that, then I am satisfied with it... Unfortunately, that's not happening right at the mo, with the pen at the back anyway.
     
  6. kja

    kja Junior Member

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    No worries , glad to help if I can. I won't tell you what trade Im qualified in other than fencing and youth work. That ones a secret :lol:

    What do you have and what are you trying to keep in/out?

    Kim
     
  7. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Thanks for the kind replies.

    kja,

    The figure 8 knot was the one I was looking for, so simple but elusive. Yesterday I wanted to join 2 pieces of wire and ballsed it up. The local fences here that I checked were all put up by builders and not farmers.

    I tie great fishing knots and might fine rope knots.

    oops. gotta run

    Mike
     
  8. Guest

    The back pen is the Billy Goats pen. At the mo he is sharing it with 2 does. Went over their yesterday and found the fence pushed down to about 2-3 foot and the corner picket bent IN at the ground at a 30 degree angle. Something big (maybe a large dog???) had obviously gone in. The fences have all been put up to keep the goats in, so wire runs on the inside of pickets and out around corners. Unfortunately - I now realise this makes very easy work if predators plan on actually getting in from the outside...

    Fence is goat wire and pickets. Goats were still in the pen. They are very tame and friendly, but does were heaps agitated. Went into check them and the buck went nuts. Think I may have actually disturbed the intruder without realising and Billy was still in defence mode! AFter wearing his horns a few times, I retreated. Have straightened things up, but need to bend that picket on the corner back out and put in some sort of decent corner strainer. Any ideas? The simpler the better...

    Also have probs straining the goat wire. It is made up of about a dozen cross wires with movable verticals, so tightening them means straining each one and really does take ages.

    Any suggestions heaps appreciated!
     
  9. kja

    kja Junior Member

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    Dig a hole about 1 meter deep. Use a piece of pipe as a strainer (3 inch is good, 2 inch is ok and old bore casing is a good cheap source). Cement the pipe into the hole and fill the pipe with cement all the way to the top. Your strainer is now a steel jacketed cement post :)

    Dig another 1 meter deep hole just slightly of the line of your fence about two meters away from the base of the strainer. Dig an angled trench from this hole back towards the strainer that is about one and a half shovel blades deep at the hole end. This is your stay block. Lay a piece of two inch pipe in the trench and attach it (by welding usually) to your strainer about 45 cm down from the top of the post. Fill the hole and the trench with cement.

    Weld another piece of pipe horizontally between the bottom of the stay and the bottom of the post to form a triangle.

    Thats a pretty top of the line trainer assembly. On a small yard you could use smaller diameter pipe and smaller holes , but don't skimp to much or they will pull over under the strain of the wires. Yes they are expensive but built this way they will last a very long time.

    Belive me I know your pain. Goat and pig netting is awful. :wink:

    Get two pieces of softwood that are longer than the goat netting is tall. Drill three holes in the timber, two about 5 cm in from each end ant the third in the middle and fit three bolts with nuts two suit. Use this as a clamp, the soft wood lets the verticals "bite" in. Loop some pieces of wire(8 gauge is best) around the top middle and bottom, hook your strainers on to these and pull them up a bit at a time until you have a nice even strain. Tie off, release your strainers and undo the clamp.

    Waratah makes a really nice hinge joint clamp, but it is probably too expensive for the amount of times you will use it. Perhaps "joint ownership" with neighbours ?

    Consider the costs of doing it well as an investment in the infrastructure of your farm.

    If these written instructions don't make much sense PM me your mailing address and I will draw up some diagrams that will make it much clearer.

    Kim
     
  10. dryland dweller

    dryland dweller Junior Member

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    RF make up 2 planks and drill holes corresponding to the gaps in the wire then put them either side of the wire bolt up tight attach 1 length of chain top to bottom a piece of fencing wire to the mid point of the chan and attach to strainer and strain up as per normal.
    Clear as mud I hope its a bit hard to explain I guess but its the way I do it and once made its good for some time I use 3"x2" for the clamp :D
    Pete
     

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