African grey worms

Discussion in 'Put Your Questions to the Experts!' started by Paul Ringo, Jan 28, 2017.

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  1. Paul Ringo

    Paul Ringo New Member

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    I'm thinking about introducing some grey worms (larger than wigglers) to help digest compost as well as break up some hard soil. Is there a good source for the African grey worms (excellent fish bait) in the U.S.? I found a place in Georgia a few years ago but I don't recall the name of it.
     
  2. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    i've never heard of those before. i would suspect that if they are
    not native it might not be a good thing to introduce them to an
    area.

    instead see if you can find other worms that are native which will
    work (or species already introduced to your area then it does not
    additional damage if you use them).

    i use a species of worms here for composting but they will not
    survive our hot or cold spells. i'm gradually replacing them with
    native worms which don't breed as quickly, but at least some of
    them will survive after being transplanted into the gardens.
     

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