Adobe Rocket Stove with bell heat distribution

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by Donkey32, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Donkey32

    Donkey32 Junior Member

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    I've just finished building a test stove in my yard. It's for evaluating a commercial rocket stove kit, plus a couple ideas of my own..
    So far the thing runs beautifully. Here is the photo-intro portion of my thread at The Donkey32 Rocket Stove forum:

    In a lot of older houses around here, there are brick pads for putting a wood stove on. Just about every house has one, they have a chimney jack through the roof (or wall) and often the floor has been beefed up below to carry extra weight. I wanted the stove to fit on one of those pads, which tend to be around 4 feet by 3 feet. I have some bricks laying about, so I put together a mock-up pad for everything to fit on. These bricks are pretty big, bigger than standard red-brick.. This pad is a few inches smaller than a 3X4 pad in all directions.
    [​IMG]


    I wanted to build this stove ONLY with stuff I can make or have laying around (plus the Dragon Core), so I made a bunch of adobe bricks. In this stack of bricks there are about 75 bricks, I used a handful more, plus some busted bits and junk from other projects.. When I was drying these bricks, the dog ran through them a few times, some of them got run over with my truck..
    I'd say the project took around 80 adobe bricks, measuring 3X6X12 inches, plus a small pile of bits, chunks and halfsies..
    [​IMG]

    First, figuring out how it will all fit. Gotta have a little room around the heater core for insulation, also enough space for the barrel.
    [​IMG]

    It's all stuck together with clay slip and cob.
    The clay's from my place. The sand came from our local river, via the aggregate co. and leftover from a different project. The straw was also leftovers.
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Here's the cavity for the stove which will double as the "manifold" area, moving exhaust from the bottom of the barrel into the bell.
    [​IMG]

    I want the Dragon core to come back out as clean as possible. This stove is just for testing purposes..
    Anyhow, I wrapped the thing up in several layers of newspaper and tape, that should keep the insulation and cob layers from sticking it.
    [​IMG]

    Plop the heater core into it's slot and fill.. I had some rice hulls laying around (all out of pearlite), mixed 'em with clay slip for insulation. Cardboard shields keep the mix from falling into the stove core.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I'm thinking that adobes that are stuck in with cob will be easier to take out than a solid cob top.. Maybe make taking it apart easier, so custom bricks. :)
    [​IMG]

    Finishing touches on seating the barrel and the manifold area.. The barrel is a little bit too tight for my liking, it's nice to have ample room to really seal in the barrel and make it sturdy. As a test, this will be fine; on a permanent installation, I'd want to add a couple-three-or-so inches to that area (closer to my 4 foot limit over all).
    [​IMG]

    Heat riser. The Dragon Heater, vermiculite-board heat riser. I haven't yet added any more insulation to it; I may yet do it but I'm putting that off for now. I'll use it as-is for a little while first.
    You cans see that the barrel has been "cheated" way over.. It took a little shuffling to make everything fit; anyway, it's better this way (for now)
    [​IMG]

    All assembled!
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice job.

    Light it!!

    :clap:
     
  3. Donkey32

    Donkey32 Junior Member

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    Done it. It's a beaut!
    High efficiency of burn, VERY low emissions, low exhaust temp; fast heat off the barrel, slow heat from the bell.

    It starts easy and runs very smooth, rides over fresh loads (of wood) and fuel type changes (softwood to hard) without fuss.
    I ran it for an extended period today. Fed it 1 inch by 1 inch by 6 inch (sorry, us Americans 're still still using the bloody kings system) redwood/fir construction waste for a number of hours (meant for my TLUD charcoal maker). The only issue I found is that the fire-box is a bit small (6 inch Rocket Stove system) and coals build up, obstructing the burn tunnel (horizontal bit) and causing a little smoke-back. You gotta let the pile burn down a bit before adding more wood.

    So far, very nice. :party:
     
  4. Earth's Internet

    Earth's Internet Junior Member

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    So this is just a test. What is it you want to do with this ? Heat your house, cook ? Excuse my ignorance as I have never heard of one in a yard before, other than a type of Bar-B-Q
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Sweet.... I want one.
     
  6. Donkey32

    Donkey32 Junior Member

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    It's a Rocket Mass Heater, for heating an interior space.
    This particular one is a testing model, to work out the (possible) bugs and/or find any fatal flaws with the idea(s), outside in a safe(ish) environment before bringing it indoors.
     
  7. Earth's Internet

    Earth's Internet Junior Member

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    Thanks
     

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