A stitch in time ...RE-inventing Thrift

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by Michaelangelica, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    https://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=9088


    I have at least three sets of these Encyclopaedia from school fetes. I love them; but have no room for them anymore either.
    I have long stopped donating books and magazines to local council libraries when i realised how much stuff they threw out or destroyed. Australian libraries probably destroy moor books than went up in the Library of Alexander Fire. Don't even think of giving them something "old" it will go straight into the garbage skip.

    (The computer spell check does not recognise "repairability")
    I wanted to buy a new door for a microwave . it would have cost1 and 1/2 times the cost of anew microwave-- if I was prepared to wait for it.

    A repair industry -= what a unique thought! :D :( :?: :!:
    While we are about it, how about working out how I can get an electrician, plumber or carpenter to do very minor repair ('stitch in time' stuff) that I can afford

    SEE also this promising more optimistic (less fanciful?) article on how SOME manufacturers are rising to the challenge
    https://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=9066
    You MIGHT even enjoy this article on the insanity of modern marketing
    https://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.as ... 058&page=1
     
  2. Wyche

    Wyche Junior Member

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    Re: A stitch in time ...RE-inventing Thrift

    I work at a home improvement warehouse. I had an older gentleman ask me about a special screwdriver one day. I asked him what it was for and he said it was to open up a clothes iron. We didn't have it, so I looked it up on Google and found one for $20us. I told him we had sale on irons for $10 dollars. We talked for about a hour, about our throw away culture and how the things we buy today are meant to thrown away. I enjoy finding products that have a healthy parts offering. This has become part of my criteria in my purchasing new products, as well as a company's comitment to not make older models obsolete. There is nothing more satisfying in my line of work than having someone come in looking to replace something that cost alot of money and selling them a $2.00 part. Thats why I love my mechanic. I took a friend to him that had a bad module that cost $200 and mechanic opened the module up and resoldered some wires and charged him $30. The economy should bring back this trait again. I learned it from my Grandmother.
     
  3. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Re: A stitch in time ...RE-inventing Thrift

    Ooh yeah.... Built in redundancy.
    My parents have a sandwich maker that they bought about 30 years ago. It toasts sandwiches. No lights and bells and fancy colour schemes. And it still works and has never missed a beat.
    The one that I bought 2 years ago (to replace the previous one that self destructed) has 2 lights, the covers of which have now broken off. I'm sure the whole thing will stop working any day now.
    Gets my goat that does....

    I also now understand why I can never get served at those home improvement places. Someone is hiding in the next aisle talking about irons! :wink:
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: A stitch in time ...RE-inventing Thrift

    LOLOLOL :lol: :lol:
    Sounds like a great job; almost as good as a nurseryman=retailer who gets to talk to people about plants all day.
    My grandfather had a huge ball of string, bigger than a soccer ball. He used to add to it any spare string he found. He would go off his head if I CUT string on a parcel; it has to be carefully un-knotted. Surprisingly he was a wealthy man most of his life; for example had a working car during the last depression of 1929-39. So he could have developed a throw-away mentality] but never did. Even so both he and my dad fixed, or did, or built, everything! My Dad even sewed better than my Mum. (Something he said he picked up in the Army). As a consequence, I felt totally inadequate and am now no handyman.

    i am just off now to buy my:- third-this-year,- Chinese, Delayed, House-Incendiary-Device otherwise known as an Electric-Kettle or Jug from K mart!
    The "Yellow Peril" is not only arresting us, but trying to burn us out too! ;)
     

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