A list of vines that will not damage houses?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by beginnergardener, Apr 10, 2014.

  1. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Does anyone know of a good list of vines to safely grow on a house without any worry of damage? I don't mind installing trellis's or wires etc. to add support.

    It is brick veneer but has many timber areas on the outside too.
     
  2. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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  3. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I dont know of a specific list of good vines.
    I can tell you one to steer clear of and that is Ivy, the evergreen one. The other types may not be so bad.
    I hd this growing on my concrete block house for years with no problems other than having to prune it twice a year, then it just turned on me and had to come off or I risked wrecking the house.
    I did alittle research ages ago about other sorts but never did get around to putting the trellising up for replacement plants.

    If its brick veneer I would not attach the trellis to the house but set up posts angled sightly towards the house.
    It is recommended that you leave a 6 inch airspace between a trellis and house.

    Cant see on where you live. One thing you could do is google native climber or rambler vines for your country if you were interested in helping native species.

    Other things that you could consider are Clematis, Climbing or rambling roses, Honeysuckle, Jasmine, Passionfruit, Grape.
    You could add things like afew Runner beans especially the ones grown to dry for winter, sweet peas.
     
  4. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    I think Jasmine seems to be quite loose, could it be the best choice maybe?
     
  5. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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  6. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    There are afew different types. They smell lovely.
    The NZ star jasmine is one I am getting this winter for a not-along-the-house trellis.
    I think any sort would probably be a good plant for beginners like us cos they dont seem to grow huge trunks and handle being hedged/pruned really well and dont seem to run off everywhere else like wisteria can
     
  7. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Thanks, I don't mind if it is 'rampant' etc. I want fast results, the only consideration is that it does not damage the house structure (bricks, mortar or wood).

    I have also seen grape and ornamental grape growing on house verandas etc, would that be a good choice?
     
  8. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    All the jasmines I've come across have been extremely rampant.
    I know you don't mind rampant beginnergardener;
    jus tbe warned it can run along the ground for a great distance before hitting something vertical to climb/strangle...
    And honeysuckle is crazy stuff in a mild climate.
    I'm a big fan of passionfruit-they need plenty of assistance to 'climb' though.
     
  9. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Grape is the "permaculture" choice.

    Which grape is your climate choice.
     
  10. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    I put some eye bolts into my brick veneer and strung up some nylon rope and grew passion fruit on it.

    Ive got grape vines too growing up the bricks attached to rope.
    Im about to build another carport trellis thingy for more passionfruit and muscadines maybe gourds and butterfly pea while im waiting for growth.


    Depending on climate you could do kiwi too
    You need a male and female though
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Why do you want to grow a vine plant on the house? Are you after shade? Is it your only growing space and you want food production? Is it for privacy screening?
     
  12. beginnergardener

    beginnergardener Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Climate:
    Warm Temperate
    For appearance mainly and a bit of privacy maybe, its for a porch area and maybe around windows and corners.

    I would plant edible but the house is from the ddt era so I wont.
     

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