A design for a kindling shed?

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by sweetpea, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    I am going mad with lots of medium sized branches that go in every direction that are great for kindling, but it's so hard to store them. I just can't spend the time breaking them down and piling them neatly. So I was hoping to design a storage shed that will help with the process.

    In an ideal world, I can imagine a shed with a hinged top that I can just toss the branches in helter skelter, and then a big weight on a pulley comes from above and smashes them into smaller pieces that then drop down a slanted board to a bin at the bottom where neat little piles of sticks stack up.

    But, this seems rather extreme, but I don't know how else to deal with them. Any ideas? Any clever ways to wrangle kindling into submission? :)
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    Are the branches green or dry? What's the diameter (approx)? What sort of trees have they come from - ones that break easily or are hard to break?
     
  3. BlackPacker

    BlackPacker Junior Member

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    Hey Sweetpea,

    this idea again? ;) Temped to repost the diagram I sent you. But my idea, if they are dry, is to have a raised box with a palette bottom raised up on concrete shoring blocks or cinder blocks. Put a pallete on top and drop your weight and the smaller pieces should gradually fall out the bottom. If they are dry... if not, you need to figure out a way to get them some sun before boxing them up.

    3 week brush pile accumlation:
    (1) five foot pile ten feet long made 25 feet long and 12 feet high.
    (1) Five by Five by ten pile made 10x10x25
    (1) New pile, 8 feet high, 10 wide, 15 long

    Fire breaks are HARD on forgotten property. I can almost twirl a chainsaw. ;)

    So, uh, want some kindling? Bring a rake. ;)
     
  4. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    BP, did I space? What diagram? :)

    I see what you mean about the palette, that's a good idea, because they would all have to be quite parallel to fall through.

    Pebble, they are dry branches, probably 1 finger to 2 fingers in width, they would snap easily, dry pine branches.

    What's a good weight? A barrel full of water? concrete blocks somehow fastened together? My old lawn mower that I would love to throw off a cliff because it drives me mad? :lol:
     
  5. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    Sounds like you need some kids about the place :wink:

    I'd be interested to see the diagram too.
     
  6. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    pebble, we can invent the Kid Crusher. Put kindling under a trampoline and let the kids loose to jump on it!! However, fathers with bottles of beer will have to wait!

    We can retire on this one!! :lol:
     
  7. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Location:
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    :D :lol:

    Or maybe it's the satisfaction of breaking and smashing things that could be utilised from kids.
     
  8. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    storing Kindling hats a hard one to solve......

    All my prunings and dead wod cut offs and green cuts etc..Get put into a pile(s) left to dry out..usually takes up 2, 6months then i just pick em up and use em when required..

    I have a big pile thats been added/removed when nessasary..

    I live on 19x 25 meter garden I have enough fire wood kindling for camp fires when i go camping.....starter fuel for the Odd B B Qs..

    Keeping them dry can be a problem in winter or rainy times, but heck how did the oldies ever survive...

    Snakes and nasty creepy crawlies hide in/under stacked wood...

    Tezza
     
  9. Jackie K

    Jackie K Junior Member

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    Hi all,
    I use an old rainwater tank on it's side, opening north/ south. I have an old screen from a crusher across the bottom (makes a flat floor and leaves a small space for drainage) to keep the wood off the floor if rain happens to come in north/south. Green wood dries pretty well because the iron tank collects heat and there is air flow through the wood as well. You could block off the space under the screen( or whatever you use, to stop snakes getting under there. Because it is open both sides I haven't had any problem with reptiles nesting in there. When I have a lot of twigs, branches to store I put half inch mesh across one end to contain the stack. Weather hasn't even got warm yet and we have already seen a snake on the move in the orchard last Monday. :shock:
    Jackie K
     
  10. Alex M

    Alex M Junior Member

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    Years ago I had neighbours who had an external hutch affair protruding from their kitchen wall. Fire wood was dropped into it, by lifting a sloping lid (which kept the rain out). Inside the Kitchen was a sliding door at just right height so that the wood could be easily taken out and put straight into the cooking range.

    It was neat setup, which prevented the inevitable tracking in of dirt and sawdust from which our house suffered. It also meant that enough kindling and fire logs could be stored cleanly and conveniently close to the stove to cover long periods of very cold or wet weather.

    As for breaking up the kindling sticks, try two solid posts spaced a few inches apart. You poke the dry stick through the posts and snap them off at the required length, at least to the limits of your strength. For a simple, quick version, drive two star pickets deeply into the ground 3 or 4 inches apart (parallel) and tie the tops (to stop them spreading) with wire. To save double handling, park your barrow under, to catch them as they fall. I recommend wearing gloves and safety glasses while you're at it.

    I often find that the exercise of cutting firewood warms me up so much that I'm in no hurry to light the stove!
     

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