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    Food trees for windy spots 
    #1
    I live on a ridge behind Fremantle, beyond the salt spray but buffeted by strong winds year round. I am keen on blueberries but have read the domesticated variety like a sheltered spot. I would also like to try a warm area variety of apple.

    Has anyone had any experience with food trees and bushes in windy spots?

    many thanks
     
     

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    #2
    Senior Member Michaelangelica's Avatar
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    No, but plants do adapt especially trees.
    It was the case that horticulturalists staked trees to stop them blowing over in the wind.
    This in fact weakens trees, creating problems in the future.
    If you grow a little seedling in a windy spot it will build up its structural cells, reinforcing its trunk to cope with the prevailing wind.
    Staking the trees stopped them moving in the wind. This movement tells the tree it needs to build a stronger stem on the lea side.

    Sometimes of course, it might not be enough:-



    I would imagine local, deeper rooted trees, may have evolved to cope with local conditions.
    "You can fix all the world's problems in a garden. .Most people don't know that" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sohI6vnWZmk
    Music can solve all the world's problems. Not many people know that- MA 2005
    "Politicians will never solve 'The Problem' because they don't realise that they are the problem" R Parsons 2001
     
     

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    #3
    Moderator 9anda1f's Avatar
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    Hawkypork, another idea might be to plant some faster-growing windbreak trees (or maybe bamboo if your climate will allow) around the perimeter of your orchard/forest to help temper the effects of the winds.

    (cool pics Michael!)
     
     

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    #4
    Senior Member permup's Avatar
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    Hi Hawky

    A good permaculture design will incorporate wind breaks into your property to protect your home and orchards/food forests from wind. You will need to analyse where your predomonant winds come from, what time of the year they are strongest etc. Wind breaks are then designed for the conditions of your property, species selection is important here, as is the gradient you use. Wind is one of the worst conditions for your plants - they hate it!
    Paula Granelli
    PDC
    PermUP
    Permaculture design from Balcony to Broadacre
     
     

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    #5
    Senior Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    I live next to the Pacific Ocean in a huge agricultural area and there are miles of windbreak shrubs here, some 100 years old. But none of them are fruit bearing, because while the tree may survive, they will be too stressed from wind and salt to produce fruit.

    The best hedges here are evergreen, drought tolerant, provide privacy, create a habitat for good insects and can give you lots of trimmings for mulch. Ceanothus, Olearia traversii, a quick growing & very tough large upright shrub with leaves glossy green above & shinny silver below. A 1st rate hedging plant are a couple. Brachyglottis rotundifolia, It's hard to keep a tree hedge under control. So if the shrubs top out at 8 feet, if you get busy with life, they won't get too out of control. Some elaeagnus are nice, but the silverberry has a large thorn on mature branches. but it gives great leaf mulch, once established doesn't need water.

    Then plant your berries and fruit trees on the protected side, they will appreciate the heat as well.
    "Life flows on within you and without you"...George Harrison
    ~~~~~~
    Coastal California, USA, Mediterranean climate - no summer rain, a little frost mid-winter
     
     

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    #6
    Thanks for the thoughtful suggestions.

    I might just dedicate the windy side to indigenous species.
     
     

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    #7
    Senior Member Michaelangelica's Avatar
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    A few intersting suggestions at
    http://www.plantthis.com.au/gardenin...&gardening=156
    including
    Feijoa | Acca sellowiana

    The answer to bruise-prone fruit with a short shelf life not being much available commercially is to grow-your-own. Manage the harvest size by eating some of the sweet colourful flowers first.

    Curry Leaf | Murraya koenigii

    The bay leaf equivalent of Indian cuisine. A relative of the orange jessamine or common murraya, regular clipping will check the red and black fruit from producing seedlings – which it would otherwise do readily.

    Tea | Camellia sinensis

    A glossy green screen, small scented white camellia flowers and a ready supply of the highly-touted wonder drink – green tea.

    Kei Apple | Dovyalis caffra

    A southern African tree or shrub with apricot-like fruit that is resilient in the face of dry or seaside conditions. Its many stiff, long spines can be used to advantage where a barrier planting is needed.
    never heard of Kei Apple | Dovyalis caffra, has anyone grown it?
    "You can fix all the world's problems in a garden. .Most people don't know that" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sohI6vnWZmk
    Music can solve all the world's problems. Not many people know that- MA 2005
    "Politicians will never solve 'The Problem' because they don't realise that they are the problem" R Parsons 2001
     
     

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