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    Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #1
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    I have a 1 year old Lemonade and Mandarin tree planted in wine barrels which both have curly leaves. There are no aphids and no evidence of citrus leaf miner. The leaves are not distorted just curled from the point to the base of the leave. It seems to affect all leaves, old and new. The Mandarin is beautifully green and looks totally healthy with new shoots. The Lemonde is not looking as healthy, just a little yellowed and frost damaged, but also has new shoots. I have fertilised, top dressed and mulched about 2 weeks ago, but nothing has changed.... any ideas?
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #2
    Moderator milifestyle's Avatar
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    Are you able to post any pictures ?

    It sounds like something might be cocooning the leaves. Any signs of critters ?

    Either that or they are enjoying some left overs from the wine barrels :lol:
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #3
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    katherine NT, Australia
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    bbmino,

    We have no idea where you are but you do give a clue when you mention frosts.

    To be fair, we may be able to assist but 'frost' on growing citrus could really be anywhere on about 80% of the globe.

    Help us out here.

    cheers,
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #4
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    it sounds like thrips.


    Q. Why are the leaves of my citrus tree deformed and fruit is scarred?

    Thrip DamageA. Throughout the growing seasons there is an insect called a thrip. They feed on the new growth of young citrus leaves and stems. By the time the leaf has matured the damage is done and the thrip is gone. Only aesthetic, cosmetic damage is caused and generally does not effect fruit-production. There are different controls used for thrips. Speak with your neighborhood Nursery Professional for the best recommendations.
    http://www.elginnursery.com/faq.php

    Citrus thrips populations can vary greatly from year to year. Monitor to determine if treatments are needed in a particular year. Navel oranges are more susceptible to damage than are Valencia oranges, which often do not require treatment.

    Treatment of young, nonbearing trees in a grove is not recommended except in severe cases. Although the citrus foliage is often heavily damaged by citrus thrips, healthy trees can withstand the damage and frequent treatments can lead to the development of insecticide resistance, making control of thrips on fruit more difficult in later years.

    Citrus thrips is less of a problem in orchards that receive minimal broad-spectrum pesticide treatments than in orchards that are heavily treated. Because of pesticide-induced hormoligosis (i.e. stimulation of thrips reproduction), thrips populations tend to increase after treatments with organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, foliar neonicotinoids, and the miticide pyridaben (Nexter).
    excerpt
    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r107301711.html


    If the leaves on your dwarf citrus are curling, there are three common possibilities:

    1. Some insect pests will cause some leaf curl. In spring, aphids might do this on soft new leaves. Look inside the curl for presence of insects. If none are present, consider 2 or 3 below.

    2. Overwatering can cause leaves to curl or cup INWARD. Also, stress from very hot weather will do it.

    3. Sometimes leaves will cup DOWNWARD in the late fall or early winter. This is not a problem to worry about, as the new growth will come out with normal shaped leaves in the spring and the trees seem to produce flowers and fruit in proliferation once established.
    http://www.fourwindsgrowers.com/solver/curl.html
    I'd rather have a life than a living.
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #5
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    Hi

    Sorry, a bit new to the site. I am in Canberra, ACT and there is are no cocoons, bugs or anything.

    I have also posted some pics, if that helps.

    Any ideas would be much appreciated.





     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #6
    Moderator milifestyle's Avatar
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    Perhaps too much/not enough water... plants often do funny things to prevent moisture loss.

    I can't say i've came across that type of leaf curl before.

    How much moisture is soaking into the wine barrel ?
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #7
    Senior Member Grahame's Avatar
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    Do you have drainage holes in the barrels? It really looks like too much water to me.
    How wet or dry is the soil when you stick your finger in?
    How often have you been watering them?
    Did you start watering them even more when they started to curl up?
    What sort of potting mix have you used?

    It's not easy to make a long distance diagnosis but...

    If it is too much water it looks to me like you might also have a problem with some kind of bacterial (?) rot going on there.
    You cannot solve a problem with the same level of consciousness that created it - Einstein

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #8
    Moderator milifestyle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame
    Do you have drainage holes in the barrels? It really looks like too much water to me.
    How wet or dry is the soil when you stick your finger in?
    How often have you been watering them?
    Did you start watering them even more when they started to curl up?
    What sort of potting mix have you used?

    It's not easy to make a long distance diagnosis but...

    If it is too much water it looks to me like you might also have a problem with some kind of bacterial (?) rot going on there.
    yeah,i saw that, there may be signs of collar rot if its too much water.
     
     

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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #9
    Senior Member purplepear's Avatar
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    I agree with the too much water perhaps but looking at the leaves I would also look to iron and boron deficiency. The yellow patches show me lack of iron and boron fixes leaf curl in my cauliflower. You can get the boron you need from a tea made with petty spurge.
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    Re: Lemonade and Mandarine with curly leaves 
    #10
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    Hi, Thanks all for your help..... I have a few things to think about now.

    The wine barrels do have a large drainage hole in each, when we filled them we used polystyrene in the bottom third, geocloth over that then filled with rich compost soil and topped with sugarcane mulch. There is no sign of collor rot, phew. But maybe the mulch was too much over winter and kept the plant too moist. That would explain the difference in the leaves between the two plants. The really curly Mandarine is sheltered by the eve (less sun to dry it out) and the sick looking lemondade (which is considerably less curly) gets more su nbut may also be suffering from the iron and/or boron deficiency.

    Thanks again... oh and my cauliflower have curly leaves too!!!
     
     

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