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    Digging up fruit trees and moving them 
    #1
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    Gday, I was wanting to know about peoples experiences with digging up and moving fruit trees.
    What do you think is the age where a fruit tree is just too many yrs established too move,
    and has anybody accidentally killed a tree trying this?
     
     

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    #2
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    They can transplant some species when they are hundreds of years old with the right transplanting techniques. It helps if the species can handle it too.

    Also the methods of removal has some bearing on the matter.

    I'd do some research on transplanting your particular species, work out the right method and take it slow.
     
     

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    #3
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    Cheers mate,,thanks heaps
     
     

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    #4
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    http://gardening.about.com/od/garden...ootPruning.htm

    What I should have done before I moved my poor Orange tree,(which did survive, but looked very sick for quite some time).
    Last edited by mischief; 13-05-2012 at 07:38 PM.
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    #5
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    thanks there
     
     

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    #6
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    There is another method, similar to that one and has been recommended to me by other aborists.

    Root Prune 4/8ths of the tree on the compass points, North/South/East/West. Go down a shovel-depth using a sharp shovel. Any roots you sever poorly, take a saw or secateurs to them. Dig out a strip of dirt behind your sever marks and back fill with a primarily sandy loam. Wait a couple of months during the growing season for new roots to grow at the severed marks. Now, dig the other 4/8 segments at NE, SW, SE, NW and pull the tree out and move into location. Then use seaweed applied at the ground and some on the leaves as irrigation once a week for a little while.

    The theory is that your initial cuts should have many new feeder roots appearing at, and behind, the site of the cuts on the roots. The tree also has time to adjust during the couple of months between diggings to the mass loss of feeders without too much shock as the other 1/2 (4/8) of the tree has no damage.
     
     

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    #7
    Senior Member Grasshopper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantom Brains View Post
    Gday, I was wanting to know about peoples experiences with digging up and moving fruit trees.
    What do you think is the age where a fruit tree is just too many yrs established too move,
    and has anybody accidentally killed a tree trying this?
    What kind of tree ?
    How old ?
    How big ?
    Deciduous ?
     
     

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    #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grasshopper View Post
    What kind of tree ?
    How old ?
    How big ?
    Deciduous ?
    Gday, No real type or size or age really, im guessing the older they get the more likely they are to get worse shock? I havent had to transplant fruit for anywhere other than a pot, so it would be a good challenge to try in the near future.. Cheers for the thoughts.
     
     

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    #9
    Senior Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    If you "warn" your tree several days ahead of time it will go better, The best time is in the fall when nights are cool and the days are getting shorter so there's not a lot of growth. this has worked for me several times.

    3 days away: Water all around the tree from the trunk out to the dripline for at least an hour. Don't let it dry out until you move the tree, so cover the whole area with a tarp or thick leaves.

    2 days away, take a shovel and sink it down into the soil only to cut, not to lift, and cut a circle of the rootball you intend to take. A pretty safe distance is half way to the dripline. If that distance is big, it might not be a good candidate for transplanting unless you really intend to excavate it, ball it up and lift it with some kind of machinery.

    1 day away, water it again.

    Day of moving (actually late afternoon, evening) -- be sure to have your new hole ready to accept it. Don't amend the new hole or the roots will circle and stay in the stuff they recognize, and not go beyond into the native soil until they are desperate and rootbound. You can make big buckets of compost tea and pour them into the new hole so they will soak down below that. I've been reading that lining granite drain rock at the bottom of the holes of fruit trees and perennial fruits is good for attracting electricity, will slowly, slowly break down and give off some nutrients, and create some air pockets in clay soil.

    Be sure to mark the north side of the tree, and when you plant it, make sure the same side that was facing north is still facing north.

    Excavate the tree making sure to transport it in an old sheet or fabric, garbage bag of some kind. make sure the rootstock bump on the trunk is a finger distance above the soilline. Refill the hole with native soil, and top with several inches of compost. Water it in, pressing carefully to eliminate air pockets.

    If the days are warm still, cover the whole tree with a white sheet or a sheer white curtain or agricultural fabric for at least two weeks. It lets light through but doesn't let the sun and wind stress it out. If it looks really floppy give it some extra water the first few days. It should be pretty perky by the second week.

    If gophers or voles are a problem, plant daffodil bulbs around the base of it. that's another reason to move it in the fall when the bulbs are available.
    Last edited by sweetpea; 16-05-2012 at 02:58 AM.
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    #10
    Senior Member Pakanohida's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetpea View Post
    If you "warn" your tree several days ahead of time it will go better, The best time is in the fall when nights are cool and the days are getting shorter so there's not a lot of growth. this has worked for me several times.

    3 days away: Water all around the tree from the trunk out to the dripline for at least an hour. Don't let it dry out until you move the tree, so cover the whole area with a tarp or thick leaves.

    2 days away, take a shovel and sink it down into the soil only to cut, not to lift, and cut a circle of the rootball you intend to take. A pretty safe distance is half way to the dripline. If that distance is big, it might not be a good candidate for transplanting unless you really intend to excavate it, ball it up and lift it with some kind of machinery.

    1 day away, water it again.

    Day of moving (actually late afternoon, evening) -- be sure to have your new hole ready to accept it. Don't amend the new hole or the roots will circle and stay in the stuff they recognize, and not go beyond into the native soil until they are desperate and rootbound. You can make big buckets of compost tea and pour them into the new hole so they will soak down below that. I've been reading that lining granite drain rock at the bottom of the holes of fruit trees and perennial fruits is good for attracting electricity, will slowly, slowly break down and give off some nutrients, and create some air pockets in clay soil.

    Be sure to mark the north side of the tree, and when you plant it, make sure the same side that was facing north is still facing north.

    Excavate the tree making sure to transport it in an old sheet or fabric, garbage bag of some kind. make sure the rootstock bump on the trunk is a finger distance above the soilline. Refill the hole with native soil, and top with several inches of compost. Water it in, pressing carefully to eliminate air pockets.

    If the days are warm still, cover the whole tree with a white sheet or a sheer white curtain or agricultural fabric for at least two weeks. It lets light through but doesn't let the sun and wind stress it out. If it looks really floppy give it some extra water the first few days. It should be pretty perky by the second week.

    If gophers or voles are a problem, plant daffodil bulbs around the base of it. that's another reason to move it in the fall when the bulbs are available.
    Make sure to also take the helper plants that are / were growing around the tree such as the lupins, comfreys, etc. that is if you planted it with such, or added to. Large hole around the tree so as to minimize damage to all of the trees roots.
    If you still have a job, get everything in order, and quit. Do it as soon as you can, because we’ve never had a more important work to do. -Kyle Chamberlin

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