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    #11
    Senior Member Pakanohida's Avatar
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    Coquille, OR, Latitude 43 North, Coastal
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetpea View Post
    Erika, while a mud roof might look cute, it's got to be engineered right. We just had a horrifying downpour for 3 days, and I've got conventional buildings, and things were leaking where they've never leaked before. You can't do anything at that point to try to save things if they aren't put together right. Or if there is a snow load, it's way better to make a rustic wooden roof with eaves that protect those walls. It's very, very dangerous to have such a structure just made out of chicken wire and mud, because there's very little structural integrity there. You might also look at how they made the California Missions, they all have wooden roofs. The standard homemade clay/straw bricks must be in the sun, no rain or dew on them, turned regularly for 30 days before using.

    Pakanohida, yes, I saw all the You Tube pieces on those cob houses, and it's inspiring, although I am trying to have less and less maintenance, and I'm afraid those darling little things need maintenance more than one might realize.

    It's certainly less maintenance then a stick constructed home, far less. I don't relish the idea of 30 year renewal of a wood stick construction methods when my mortgage is up in nearly the same amount of time. I am trying to do all my buildings on the property to last more then my life time.
     
     

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    #12
    Senior Member Pakanohida's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pebble View Post
    " NZ Parliament building is made of cob! "

    Which building are you talking about? AFAIK none of the current parliament buildings are cob/earth buildings.
    I am unsure, I was told this by Ianto Evans when I met him last year. He had just returned from NZ & working on his next book regarding cob and he was telling us how annoyed he was he has to go back because on the very last day he learned that the buildings were cob built with earthern plaster over it. I will need to get back to you on this & research it for you.

    Here is a small bio of Ianto Evans, for an fyi.

    Ianto Evans, an applied ecologist, landscape architect, inventor, writer and teacher with building experience on six continents. Cob is traditional in Wales, his homeland. He teaches ecological building and has consulted to USAID, World Bank, US Peace Corps and foreign governments. Ianto, Linda Smiley and Michael Smith are the authors of "The Hand-Sculpted House", the most comprehensive book available about cob building.
    Last edited by Pakanohida; 17-04-2011 at 01:54 AM.
     
     

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    #13
    Senior Member pebble's Avatar
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    Thanks :-) I know of Ianto Evans and his work, and think The Hand-Sculpted House is a beautiful, essential work.

    I wonder if he is talking about some of the original buildings from the 1800s? Here's the current parliament buildings. Two are obviously modern, mainstream buildings. The other two don't look like cob/earth to me.

    http://www.parliament.nz/en-NZ/About...dgs/Buildings/

    There are some older earth buildings here (from the 1800s), notably Pompallier House (rammed earth)

    http://www.nzine.co.nz/images/articl...useRussell.jpg

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompall...e#Construction

    I'd be very interested to hear what you find out.

    There's also lots of cob cottages from that time too, miner's cottages etc.
     
     

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    #14
    Senior Member Pakanohida's Avatar
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    I'll let you know, but it will take some time. He's literally on the other side of town, and I never see him, or the people at Mountain Homestead either, we all are doing our own things. They have both been in this town a long time, I am still setting up and learning all I can.

    On the flip side, I am building a dual chamber cob oven (mark 2) in the next few months. I'll make a new post for that.
    Last edited by Pakanohida; 17-04-2011 at 12:40 PM. Reason: whoops!
     
     

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    #15
    Senior Member sweetpea's Avatar
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    Pakanohida, are you thinking that wood construction homes only last 30 years? The majority of houses in the US were built between 1940 and 1980 (that's 30 years ago!! eeeeeek!) and are fine, as elsewhere. Not sure what you mean. Stick houses built in the late 1800s are still going strong.

    The majority of missions built from clay are not, however. You can walk around the outside and see how the clay crumbles. there will always be cracks in plaster or clay as the foundation shifts. Especially a new foundation that takes a few years to settle, there's a constant maintenance of hairline cracks, especially around windows. Salt air also affects clay-type bricks causing them to crumble. They used to make boats out of cement during WW2, and the salt water breaks down the cement. There's a State park at a beach near me where the Cement Boat, as everyone calls it, is slowing disintegrating as it sits on the beach.

    http://www.missionsofcalifornia.org/
    "Life flows on within you and without you"...George Harrison
    ~~~~~~
    Coastal California, USA, Mediterranean climate - no summer rain, a little frost mid-winter
     
     

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